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THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO 
LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA 



Social Sciences & Humanities Library 

University of California, San Diego 
Please Note: This item is subject to recall. 

Date Due 



MAR 1 f> 19 c 7 





























































CI 39 (2/95) UCSD L to. 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO 




3 1822 01957 4995 



IE LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY 

EDITED BY 

E. PAGE, Litt.D. , and W. H. D. ROUSE, Litt.D. 



OVID 

HEROIDES AND AMORES 



OVID 

HEROIDES AND A MO RES 

WITH AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION BY 

GRANT SHOWER MAN 

PROFESSOR OF LATIN IN" THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN 
| , O. , £ \ I. i ' LL 1 | • 




LONDON : WILLIAM HEINEMANN 
NEW YORK : THE M ACM ILL AN CO. 

MOMXIV 



CONTENTS 

I'AOE 

THE HEROIDES 1 

THE AMORES 313 

, N DEX 508 



vii 



MANUSCRIPTS, EDITIONS, AND 
TEXTUAL CRITICISM OF 
THE HEROIDES 



The principal manuscripts of the Heroides are 
the following : — 

1. Codex Parisinus 8242, formerly called Puteanus, 

of the eleventh century, corrected about the 
twelfth ; by universal consent the best manu- 
script. It contains the Heroides and the 
Amores, with omissions. Of the Heroides 
there is lacking: I ; II, 1-13; IV, 48-103 ; 
V, 97-end; VI, 1-49; XV; XVI, 39-142; 
XX, 176-end. 

2. Codex Guelferbytanus, of the twelfth century, 

with a recension in the thirteenth ; of com- 
paratively little value. XVII-XX are almost 
illegible. The first hand gave to XX, 194. 

3. Codex Etonensis, of the eleventh century, but 

inferior to its contemporarv, the Parisinus. 
It contains, with various other compositions, 
the Heroides up to VII, 157. 

4. Schedae Vindobonenses, of the twelfth century, 

containing fragments of X-XX, omitting XV, 
and often serving to confirm the Parisinus. 



5 



TEXTUAL CRITICISM OF THE HERO IDES 



5. Codex Francofurtanus, of the thirteenth century, 

the best authority for XV. 

6. A mass of manuscripts of the thirteenth, four- 

teenth, and fifteenth centuries, all of which 
have been subjected to extensive alterations. 

7. The Greek translation of Maximus Planudes, 

of the latter part of the thirteenth century, 
from a Latin manuscript resembling the 
Parisinus, and of considerable value in the 
parts omitted by it. 

• Two Editiones Principes of Ovid appeared in 1471 
— one at Rome and one at Bologna, with independent 
texts. A Venetian edition was published in 1491, 
with commentary by Vossius. 

The principal edition of recent times is that of 
Arthur Palmer, Oxford, 1898. It contains the Greek 
translation of Planudes. The introduction and por- 
tions of the commentary are by Louis C. Purser, who 
assumed the task of completing the work at Palmer's 
request a short time before his death in 1897. The 
text in Postgate's Corpus Poetarum Latinorum, 
Vol. I, 1894, is also Palmer's. 

Other editors and critics may be mentioned as 
follows: A. Heinsius, Amsterdam, 1661; Bentley, 
1662-1742; Heinsius-Burmann, Amsterdam, 1727; 
Van Lennep, Amsterdam, 1809 : Loers, Cologne, 
1829; Madvig, Emendationes Latinae, 1873; Mer- 
kel, 1876; Shuckburgh, Thirteen Epistles, London, 
1879, corrected in 1885; Sedlmayer, Vienna, 1886; 
Ehwald, edition of Merkel, 1888: Housman, critical 
notes, Classical Review, 1897. 



6 



MANUSCRIPTS, EDITIONS, AND 
TEXTUAL CRITICISM OF 
THE HEROIDES 



The principal manuscripts of the Heroides are 
the following : — 

1. Codex Parisinus 8242, formerly called Puteanus, 

of the eleventh century, corrected about the 
twelfth ; by universal consent the best manu- 
script. It contains the Heroides and the 
Amores, with omissions. Of the Heroides 
there is lacking: I ; II, 1-13; IV, 48-103 ; 
V, 97-end; VI, 1-49; XV; XVI, 39-142; 
XX, 176-end. 

2. Codex Guelferbytanus, of the twelfth century, 

with a recension in the thirteenth ; of com- 
paratively little value. XVII-XX are almost 
illegible. The first hand gave to XX, 194. 

3. Codex Etonensis, of the eleventh century, but 

inferior to its contemporarv, the Parisinus. 
It contains, with various other compositions, 
the Heroides up to VII, 157. 

4. Schedae Vindobonenses, of the twelfth century, 

containing fragments of X-XX, omitting XV, 
and often serving to confirm the Parisinus. 



5 



TEXTUAL CRITICISM OF THE HERO IDES 



5. Codex Francofurtanus, of the thirteenth century, 

the best authority for XV. 

6. A mass of manuscripts of the thirteenth, four- 

teenth, and fifteenth centuries, all of which 
have been subjected to extensive alterations. 

7. The Greek translation of Maximus Planudes, 

of the latter part of the thirteenth century, 
from a Latin manuscript resembling the 
Parisinus, and of considerable value in the 
parts omitted by it. 

• Two Editiones Principes of Ovid appeared in 1471 
— one at Rome and one at Bologna, with independent 
texts. A Venetian edition was published in 1491, 
with commentary by Vossius. 

The principal edition of recent times is that of 
Arthur Palmer, Oxford, 1898. It contains the Greek 
translation of Planudes. The introduction and por- 
tions of the commentary are by Louis C. Purser, who 
assumed the task of completing the work at Palmer's 
request a short time before his death in 1897. The 
text in Postgate's Corpus Poetarum Latinorum, 
Vol. I, 1894, is also Palmer's. 

Other editors and critics may be mentioned as 
follows: A. Heinsius, Amsterdam, 1661; Bentley, 
1662-1742; Heinsius-Burmann, Amsterdam, 1727; 
Van Lennep, Amsterdam, 1809 : Loers, Cologne, 
1829; Madvig, Emendationes Latinae, 1873; Mer- 
kel, 1876; Shuckburgh, Thirteen Epistles, London, 
1879, corrected in 1885; Sedlmayer, Vienna, 1886; 
Ehwald, edition of Merkel, 1888: Housman, critical 
notes, Classical Review, 1897. 



6 



SIGNS AND ABBREVIATIONS 

P = Parisinus. 

G = Guelferbytanus. 

E = Etonensis. 

V = Vindobonensis. 

F = Francofurtanus. 

to = the mass of MSS. of the thirteenth to 

fifteenth centuries. 
s = a f ew inferior MSS. of the thirteenth to 
fifteenth centuries. 
Bent. = Bentley. 
Hein. = Heinsius. 
Burin. = Burmann. 
Merk. = Merkel. 
Sedl. = Sedlmayer. 
Ehw. = Ehwald. 

Pa. = Palmer. 
Hons. = Housman. 



7 



IN APPRECIATION OF THE 
HEROIDES 



The Heroides are not a work of the highest order 
of genius. Their language, nearly always artificial, 
frequently rhetorical, and often diffuse, is the same 
throughout — whether from the lips of barbarian 
Medea or Sappho the poetess. The heroines and 
heroes who speak it are creatures from the world of 
legend, are not always warm flesh and blood, and 
rarely communicate their passions to us. The critic 
who cares more for the raising of a laugh than for 
the strict rendering of justice may with no great 
difficulty find room here for the exercise of his wit. 

Yet the malicious critic of the Heroides will be 
hard to find ; for they belong to the engaging sort of 
art which disarms criticism. Their theme, first of all, 
is the universal theme of love — and of woman's love 
— and of woman's love in straits. The heroines that 
speak to us from Ovid's page may lack in convincing 
quality, and may not stir our passions, but they are 
sufficiently real to win our sympathy, and to blind us 
for the moment to the faults of both themselves and 
their sponsor. Their language may be unvarying, 
and may border too much on the rhetorical, but it is 
full-flowing, clear, euphonious, and restful. It may 
be artificial, but its very artificiality is of charming 
quality. 

8 



IN APPRECIATION OK THE HEROIDES 



What the Heroidcs lose by reason of being the 
portrayal of legendary characters in language removed 
from ordinary life they gain from their pleasant 
quality of style, and from their constant stimulation 
of literary reminiscence. They should not be judged 
as attempts at realistic art ; their author did not 
aim at even naturalism. If we must choose, they 
should be judged on the basis of their connection 
rather with literature than with life. 

Yet we need not choose ; we may enjoy them as 
clever and genial treatments of literary themes 
enriched with enough of the warmly human to beget 
in the benevolent reader the illusion of life. Pene- 
lope, Briseis, Dido, and Helen no doubt interest us 
mainly as figures from Homer and Virgil, but even 
they possess qualities that give them semblance 
of reality : Penelope is faithful, Briseis forgiving, 
Dido filled with despair, and Helen with vanity. 
In Medea, Hypsipyle, Oenone, and Ariadne, there is 
a nearer approach to real passion. The wifely 
solicitude of Laodamia, the loving trustfulness of 
deserted Phyllis, and the mother's grief of Canace 
are still more warm with life. The stories of Acontius 
and Cydippe, and in greater degree of Hero and 
Leander, are so full of the romance of young love 
that we think of neither life nor letters, but simply 
enjoy the delightful tale. And, whatever else may 
be said of his heroines, in every one of them the 
poet has placed the most human of qualities — a heart 
submissive to the power of love. All the world loves 
a lover, and all the world has for a long time loved 
most of the Heroides. 

» 



9 



P. OVIDI NASONIS HEROIDES 



i 

Penelope Ui.ixi 

Hanc tua Penelope lento tibi mittit, Ulixe — 

nil mihi rescribas tu tamen ; 1 ipse veni ! 
Troia iacet certe, Danais hivisa puellis ; 

vix Priamns tanti totaque Troia fuit. 
o utinam turn, cum Lacedaemona classe petebat, 5 

obrutus insanis esset adulter aqnis ! 
non ego deserto iacuissem frigida lecto^ 

non quererer tardos ire relicta dies ; 
nec mihi quaerenti spatiosam fallere noctem 

lassaret 2 viduas pendula tela manus. 10 
Quando ego non timid graviora pericula veris ? 

res est solliciti plena timoris amor, 
in te fingebam violentos Troas ituros ; 

nomine in Hectoreo pallida semper eram. 
sive quis Antilochum narrabat ab hoste revictum, 3 15 

Antilochus nostri causa timoris erat ; 

1 tu tamen Bent. : at tamen G. Often written rescribas, tu 
tamen ipse veni. 2 lassaret w : laseasset G. 

3 ab hoste revictum Hons.: ab Hectore victum MSS. con- 
tradicts the fact. * 

io 



THE 

HEROIDES OF P. OVIDIUS NASO 



i 

Penelote to Ulysses 

This missive your Penelope sends to you, O 
Ulysses, slow of return that you are — yet write 
nothing back to me ; yourself come ! Troy, to be 
sure, is fallen, hated of the daughters of Greeee ; but 
scarcely were Priam and all Troy worth the price to 
me. a O would that then, when his ship was on the 
way to Lacedaemon, the adulterous lover had been 
overwhelmed by raging waters ! Then had I not 
lain eold in my deserted bed, nor would now be 
left alone complaining of slowly passing days ; nor 
would the hanging web be wearying now my widowed 
hands as I seek to beguile the hours of spacious night. 

11 When have I not feared dangers graver than 
the real ? Love is a thing ever rilled with anxious 
fear. It was upon you that my fancy ever told me 
the furious Trojans would rush ; at mention of 
the name of Heetor my pallor ever came. Did 
someone begin the tale of Antilochus laid low by 
the enemy, Antilochus was eause of my alarm; or, 

" Homer is Ovid's direct source for this letter. Tennyson's 
Ulysses is of interest in connection with it. 

For brief statements of the circumstances under which the 
heroines write their letters, and for proper names in general, 
consult the index. 

I I 



OVID 



sive Menoetiaden falsis cecidisse sub armis, 

flebam successu posse carere dolos. 
sanguine Tlepolemus Lyciam tepefecerat hastam ; 

Tlepolemi leto cura novata raea est. 20 
denique, quisquis erat castris iugulatus Achivis, 

frigidius glacie pectus amantis erat. 
Sed bene consuluit casto deus aequus amori. 

versa est in cineres sospite Troia viro. 
Argolici rediere duces, altaria fumant ; 25 

ponitur ad patrios barbara praeda deos. 
grata ferunt nymphae pro salvis dona mantis ; 

illi victa suis Troica fata canunt. 
mirantur iustique senes trepidaeque puellae ; 

narrantis coniunx pendet ab ore viri. 30 
atque aliquis posita monstrat fera proelia mensa, 

pingit et exiguo Pergama tota mero : 
" hac ibat Simois ; baec est Sigeia tellus ; 

hie steterat Priami regia eelsa senis. 
illic Aeacides, illic tendebat Ulixes ; 35 

hie lacer admissos terruit Hector equos." 
Omnia namque tuo senior te quaerere misso 

rettulerat nato Nestor, at ille mihi. 
rettulit et ferro Rhesumque Dolonaque caesos, 

utque sit hie somno proditus, ille dolo. 40 
ausus es, — o nimium nimiumque oblite tuorum ! — 

Thracia nocturno tangere castra dolo 
totque simul mactare viros, adiutus ab uno ! 

at bene cautus eras et meraor ante mei ! 

" Patroclus in the armour of Achilles. 

6 Tlepolemus was slain by Sarpedon, king of Lycia. 

c The past rises vividly in her mind. 



THE HEROIDES I 



did he tell of how the son of Menoetius fell in 
armour not his own/ I wept that wiles could lack 
success. Had Tlepolemus with his blood made warm 
the Lycian spear, 6 in Tlepolemus' fate was all my 
care renewed. In short, whoever it was in the 
Argive camp that was pierced and fell, colder than 
ice grew the heart of her who loves you. 

23 But good regard for me had the god who looks 
with favour upon chaste love. Turned to ashes is 
Troy, and my lord is safe. The Argolic chieftains 
have returned, our altars are a-smoke ; before the 
gods of our fathers is laid the barbarian spoil. The 
young wife comes bearing thank-offering for her 
husband saved ; the husband sings of the fates of 
Troy that have yielded to his own. Righteous 
elder and trembling girl admire ; the wife hangs 
on the tale that falls from her husband's lips. 
And someone about the board shows thereon the 
fierce combat, and with scant tracing of wine pictures 
forth all Pergamum : " Here flowed the Simois ; this 
is the Sigeian land ; here stood the lofty palace 
of Priam the ancient. Yonder tented the son 
of Aeacus ; yonder, Ulysses ; here, in wild course 
went the frightened steeds with Hector's mutilated 
corpse." 

37 For the whole story was told your son, whom I 
sent to seek you ; ancient Nestor told him, and he 
told me. He told as well of Rhesus' and Dolon's fall 
by the sword, how the one was betrayed by slumber, 
the other undone by guile. You had the daring — O 
too, too forgetful of your own ! — to set wily foot 
by night in the Thracian camp, and to slay so many 
men, all at one time, and with only one to aid ! 
Ah yes, you were cautious, indeed, and ever gave me 



l 3 



OVID 



usque metu micuere sinus, dum victor amicum 45 

dictus es Ismariis isse per agmen equis. 
Sed mihi quid prodest vestris disiecta lacertis 

Ilios et, murus quod fuit, esse solum, 
si maneo, qualis Troia durante manebam, 

virque mihi dempto fine carendus abest ? 50 
diruta sunt aliis, uni mihi Pergama restant, 

incola captivo quae bove victor arat. 
iam seges est, ubi Troia fuit, resecandaque falce 

luxuriat Phrygio sanguine pinguis humus ; 
semisepulta virum curvis feriuntur aratris 55 

ossa, ruinosas occulit herba domos. 
victor abes, nec scire mihi, quae causa morandi, 

aut in quo lateas ferreus orbe, beet ! 
Quisquis ad haec vertit peregrinam litora puppim, 

ille mihi de te multa rogatus al)it, 60 
quamque tibi reddat, si te modo viderit usquam, 

traditur huic digitis charta notata meis. 
nos Pylon, antiqui Neleia Nestoris arva, 

misimus ; incerta est fama remissa Pylo. 
misimus et Sparten ; Sparte quoque nescia veri. 1 65 

quas habitas terras, aut ubi lentus abes ? 
utilius starent etiamnunc moenia Phoebi — 

irascor votis, heu, levis ipsa meis ! 
scirem ubi pugnares, et tantum bella timerem, 

et mea cum niultis iuncta querela foret. 70 
1 vestri Bent. 

a If this refers to Telemachus' journey, Ovid has forgotten 
his Homer, or disregards it ; for in the Odyssey (2, 373) 
Telemachus goes without his mother's knowledge. 



14 



THE HEROIDES I 



first thought ! My heart leaped with fear at every 
word until I was told of your victorious riding back 
through the friendly lines of the Greeks with the 
coursers of Ismarus. 

47 But of what avail to me that Ilion has been 
scattered in ruin by your arms, and that what once 
was wall is now level ground — if I am still to remain 
such as I was while Troy endured, and must live to 
all time bereft of my lord ? For others Pergamum 
has been brought low ; for me alone it still stands, 
though the victor dwell within and drive there the 
plow with the ox he took as spoil. Now are fields 
of corn where Troy once was, and soil made fertile 
with Phrygian blood waves rich with harvest ready 
for the sickle ; the half-buried bones of her heroes 
are struck by the curved share, and herbage hides 
from sight her ruined palaces. A victor, you are yet 
not here, nor am I let know what causes your delay, 
or in what part of the world hard-heartedly you hide. 

59 Whoso turns to these shores of ours his stranger 
ship is plied with many a question ere he go away, 
and into his hand is given the sheet writ by these 
fingers of mine, to render up should he but see 
you anywhere. We have sent to Pylos, the land of 
ancient Nestor, Neleus' son ; the word brought back 
from Pylos was nothing sure. a We have sent to 
Sparta, too ; Sparta also could tell us nothing true. 
In what lands are you abiding, or where do you idly 
tarry ? Better for me, were the walls of Phoebus 
still standing in their place — ah me inconstant, 
1 am wroth with the vows myself have made ! 
Had they not fallen, I should know where you 
were fighting, and have only war to fear, and my 
plaint would be joined. with that of many another. 



15 



OVID 



quid timeam, ignoro — timeo tamen omnia demens, 

et patet in curas area lata meas. 
quaecumque aequor habet,quaecumquepericula tellus, 

tarn longae causas suspicor esse morae. 
haec ego dum stulte metuo, quae vestra libido est, 75 

esse peregrino captus amore potes. 
forsitan et narres, quam sit tibi rustica coniunx, 

quae tantum lanas non sinat esse rudes. 
fallar, et hoc crimen tenues vanescat in auras, 

neve, revertendi liber, abesse velis ! 80 
Me pater Icarius viduo discedere lecto 

cogit et immensas increpat usque moras, 
increpet usque licet — tua sum, tua dicar oportet ; 

Penelope CQniunx semper Ulixis ero. 
ille tamen pietate mea precibusque pudicis 85 

frangitur et vires temperat ipse suas. 
Dulichii Samiique et quos tulit alta Zacynthos, 

turba ruunt in me luxuriosa proci, 
inque tua regnant nullis prohibentibus aula ; 

viscera nostra, tuae dilacerantur opes. 90 
quid tibi Pisandrum Polybumque Medontaque dirum 

Eurymachique avidas Antinoique manus 
atque alios referam, quos omnis turpiter absens 

ipse tuo partis sanguine rebus alis ? 
Irus egens pecorisque Melanthius actor edendi 95 

ultimus accedunt in tua damna pudor. 



° Rustica is frequent in the Heroides. It suggests " rustic," 
" conntryfied," "simple," "homely," "unsophisticated," 
but may be rendered well by no single word. 

16 



THE HEROIDES I 



But now, what I am to fear I know not — yet none 
the less I fear all things, distraught, and wide 
is the field lies open for my cares. Whatever 
dangers the deep contains, whatever the land, sus- 
picion tells ine are cause of your long delay. While 
I live on in foolish fear of tilings like these, 
you may be captive to a stranger love — such are 
the hearts of you men ! It may be you even 
tell how rustic a a wife you have — one fit only to 
dress fine the wool. May I be mistaken, and this 
charge of mine be found slight as the breeze that 
blows, and may it not be that, free to return, you 
will to be away ! 

81 As for me — my father Icarius enjoins on me 
to quit my widowed couch, and ever chides me 
for my measureless delay. Let him chicle on — 
yours I am, yours must I be called ; Penelope, 
the wife of Ulysses, ever shall I be. Vet is he 
bent by my faithfulness and my chaste prayers, 
and of himself abates his urgency. The men of 
Dulichium and Samos, and they whom high 
Zaeynthus bore — a wanton throng — come pressing 
about me, suing for my hand. In your own hall they 
are masters, with none to say them nay; my heart is 
being torn, your substance spoiled. Why tell you 
of Pisander, and of Polybus, and of Mcdon the 
cruel, and of the grasping hands of Eurymachus and 
Antinous, and of others, all of whom through 
shameful absence you yourself are feeding fat with 
store that was won at cost of your blood ? Irus the 
beggar, and Melanthius, who drives in your flocks to 
be consumed, are the crowning disgrace now added 
to your ruin. 



17 

c 



OVID 



Tres suraus inbelles numero, sine viribus uxor 

Laertesque senex Telemachusque puer. 
ille per insidias paene est mi hi nuper adenmtus, 

dum pai'at invitis omnibus ire Pylon. 1 100 
di, precor, hoc iubeant, ut euntibus ordine fatis 

ille meos oculos conprimat, ille tuos ! 
hac faciunt eustosque bourn longaevaque nutrix, 

Tertius inmundae cura fidelis harae ; 2 
sed neque Laertes, ut qui sit inutilis armis, 105 

hostibus in mediis regna tenere potest — 
Telemacho veniet, vivat modo, fortior aetas ; 

nunc erat auxiliis ilia tuenda patris 3 — 
nee mihi sunt vires inimicos pellere tectis. 

tu citius venias, portus et ara tuis ! 110 
est tibi sitque^ precor, natus, qui mollibus annis 

in patrias artes erudiendus erat. 
respice Laerten ; ut iam sua lumina condas, 

extremum fati sustinet ille diem. 4 
Certe ego, quae fueram te discedente puella, 115 

protinus ut venias, facta videbor anus. 

II 

Phyllis Demopiioonti 

Hospita, Demophoon, tua te Rhodopeia Phyllis 
ultra promissuni tempus abesse queror. 

1 99,100 spurious Bent. 

2 Ehio. places 103, 104 after 96 : hac Tyrrell ; hec G E w : 
hue Rent. : hinc Merk. 

18 



THE HEROIDES II 



97 We number only three, unused to war — a power- 
less wife ; Laertes, an old man ; Telemachus, a boy. 
He was of late all but waylaid and taken from me, 
while making ready, against the will of all of them, 
to go to Pylos. The gods grant, I pray, that our 
fated ends may come in due succession — that he be 
the one to close my eyes, the one to close yours ! To 
sustain our cause are the guardian of your cattle 
and the ancient nurse, and, as a third, the faithful 
ward of the unclean stye ; but neither Laertes, 
unable as he is to wield arms now, can sway the 
sceptre in the midst of our foes — Telemachus, in- 
deed, so he live on, will arrive at years of strength, 
but now should have his father's aid and guarding — 
nor have I strength to repel the enemy from our 
halls. Do you yourself make haste to come, haven 
and altar of safety for your own ! You have a son — 
and may you have him ever, is my prayer — who in 
his tender years should have been trained by you in 
his father's ways. Have regard for Laertes ; in the 
hope that you will come at last to close his eyes, 
he is withstanding the final day of fate. 

115 As for myself, who when you left my side was but 
a girl, though you should come straightway, I surely 
shall seem grown an aged dame. 

II 

PllVLLlS TO DEMOPHOON 

I, voun Phyllis, who welcomed you to Rhodope, 
Demophoon, complain that the promised day is past, 

3 Bil l place* 107, 108 after 98 : spurious Sedl. SchenM. 

4 111-114 spurious Bent. 



l 9 

r -2 



OVID 



comua cum lunae pleno semel orbe coissent, 

litoribus nostris ancora pacta tua est — 
hina quater latuit, toto quater orbe recrevit ; 5 

nec vehit Actaeas Sithonis unda rates, 
tempora si numeres — bene quae 1 numeramus 
aniantes — 

non venit ante suam nostra querela diem. 
Spes quoque lenta fuit ; tarde, quae credita laedunt, 

credimus. invito nunc et araore noces. 2 10 
saepe fui mendax pro te mihi, saepe putavi 3 

alba procellosos vela referre Notos. 
Tliesea devovi, quia te dimittere nollet ; 

nec tenuit cursus forsitan ille tuos. 
interdum timui, ne, dum vada tendis ad Hebri, 15 

mersa foret cana naufraga puppis aqua, 
saepe deos 4 supplex, ut tu, scelerate, valeres, 

cum prece turicremis sum venerata sacris ; 
saepe, videns ventos caelo pelagoque faventes, 

ipsa mihi dixi : "si valet ille, venit." 20 
denique fidus amor, quidquid properantibus obstat, 

finxit, et ad causas ingeniosa fui. 
at tu lentus abes ; nec te iurata reducunt 

nmmna, nec nostro motus amore redis. 
Demophoon, ventis et verba et vela dedisti ; 25 

vela queror reditu, verba carere fide. 

1 bene quae E u Plan. : quae nos Merle. 

2 So 6 : invita nunc et amante nocens E. 

3 putavi E s Plan.: notavi O Merl: 

4 deo Pa. who omits 18, 19. 

" Attica. 



JO 



THE HEROIDES II 



and you not here. When once the horns of the 
moon should have come together in full orb, our 
shores were to expect your anchor — the moon has 
four times waned, and four times waxed again to her 
orb complete ; yet the Sithonian wave brings not the 
ships of Acte. a Should you count the days — which 
we count well who love — you will find my plaint 
come not before its time. 

9 Hope, too, has been slow to leave me ; we are 
tardy in believing, when belief brings hurt. Even 
now my love is loath to let me think you 
wrong me. Oft have I been false to myself 
in my defenee of you ; oft have I thought the 
gusty breezes of the south were bringing back your 
white sails. Theseus I have cursed, because 
methought he would not let you go; yet mayhap 
'tis not he that has stayed your course. At times 
have I feared lest, while you were holding toward 
the waters of the Hebrus, your craft had been 
wrecked and engulfed in the foaming wave. Oft, 
bending the knee in prayer that you fare well — ah, 
wretched man ! — have I venerated the gods with 
prayer or with burning of holy incense ; oft, seeing 
in sky and on sea that the winds were favouring, 
have I said to myself : " If he do fare well, he is on 
the way." In a word, all things soever that hinder 
those in haste to come, my faithful love has tried to 
image forth, and my wit has been fertile in the 
finding of causes. But you delay long your coining ; 
neither do the gods by whom yon' swore bring you 
back to me, nor does love of mine move your 
return. Demophoon, to the winds you gave at once 
both promised word and sails ; your sails, alas ! have 
not returned, your promised word has not been kept. 



OVID 

Die mihi, quid feci, nisi non sapienter amavi ? 

crimine te potui dememisse meo. 
unum in me scelus est, quod te, scelerate, recepi ; 

sed scelus hoc meriti pondus et instar habet. 30 
iura, fides ubi nunc, commissaque dextera dextrae, 

quique ei'at in falso plurimus ore deus ? 
promissus socios ubi nunc Hymenaeus in annos, 

qui mihi coniugii sponsor et obses erat ? 
per mare, quod totum ventis agitatur et undis, 35 

per quod saepe ieras, per quod iturus eras, 
perque tuum mihi iurasti — nisi fictus et ille est — 

concita qui ventis aequora mulcet, avum, 
per Venerem nimiumque mihi facientia tela — 

altera tela arcus, altera tela faces — 40 
Iunonemque, toris quae praesidet alma maritis, 

et per taediferae mystica sacra deae. 
si de tot laesis sua numina quisque deorum 

vindicet, in poenas non satis unus eris. 
At laceras etiam puppes furiosa refeci — 45 

ut, qua desererer, firma carina foret ! — 
remigiumque dedi, quod me fugiturus haberes. 

heu ! patior telis vulnera facta meis ! 
credidimus blandis, quorum tibi copia, verbis ; 

credidimus generi nominibusque tuis ; 50 



THE HERO IDES II 



27 Tell me, what have I clone, except not wisely 
love ? — and by the very fault I might well have 
won you for my own. The one crime which may be 
charged to me is that I took you, O faithless, to 
myself ; but this crime has all the weight and 
seeming of good desert. The bonds that should 
hold you, the faith that you swore, where are 
they now? — and the pledge of the right hand you 
placed in mine, and the talk of God that was ever on - 
your lying lips ? Where now the bond of Hymen 
promised for years of life together — promise that was 
my warrant and surety for the wedded state ? By 
the sea, all tossed by wind and wave, over which you 
had often gone, over which you were still to go ; and 
b}' your grandsire — unless he, too, is but a fiction — 
by your grandsire, who calms the windwrought wave, 
you swore to nie ; yes, and by Venus and the 
weapons that wound me all too much — one weapon 
the bow, the other the torch ; and by Juno, the 
kindly ward of the bridal bed ; and by the mystical 
rites of the goddess who bears the torch. Should 
all the many gods you have wronged take vengeance 
for the outrage to their sacred names, your single 
life would not suffice. 

45 Yes, and more, in my madness I even refitted 
your shattered ships — that the keel might be firm 
by which I was left behind! — and gave you the 
oars by which you were to fiy from me. Ah me, my 
Jiangs are from wounds wrought by weapons of my 
own ! I had faith in your wheedling words, and 
you had good store of them ; I had faith in your 
lineage, and in the names it shows; I had faith 

2 3 



OVID 



credidimus lacrimis — an et h*e simulare docentur ? 

hae quoque habent artes, quaque iubentur, eunt ? 
dis quoque credidimus. quo iam tot pignora nobis ? 

parte satis potui qualibet inde capi. 
Nec moveor, quod te iuvi portuque locoque — 55 

debuit haec meriti summa fuisse mei ! 
turpiter hospitium lecto cumulasse iugali 

paenitet, et lateri conseruisse latus. 
quae fuit ante illam, mallem suprema fuisset 

nox mihi, dum potui Phyllis honesta mori. 60 
speravi melius, quia me meruisse putavi ; 

quaecumque ex merito spes venit, aequa venit. 
Fallere credentem non est operosa puellam 

gloria, simplicitas digna favore fuit. 
sum decepta tuis et amans et femina verbis. 65 

di faciant, laudis summa sit ista tuae ! 
inter et Aegidas, media statuaris in urbe, 

magnificus titulis stet pater ante suis. 
cum fuerit Sciron lectus torvusque Procrustes 

et Sinis et tauri mixtaque forma viri 70 
et domitae bello Thebae fusique bimembres 

et pulsata nigri regia caeca dei — 
hoc tua post illos titulo signetur imago : 

H1C EST, CUIUS AMANS HOSP1TA CAPTA DOLO EST. 

de tanta rerum turba factisque parentis 75 
sedit in ingenio Cressa relicta tuo. 



" Theseus. 



24 



THE HERO IDES II 



in your tears — or can these also be taught to feign ; 
and are these also guileful, and ready to flow where 
bidden ? I had faith , too, in the gods by whom 
you swore. To what end. pray, so many pledges of 
faith to me ? By any part of them, however slight, 
I eould have been ensnared. 

55 I am stirred by no regret that I aided you with 
haven and abiding-place — only, this should have 
been the limit of my kindness ! Shamefully to 
have added to my weleome of the guest the favours 
of the marriage-bed is what 1 repent me of — to have 
pressed your side to my own. The night before 
that night I eould wish had been the last for me, 
while 1 still could have died Phyllis the chaste. 1 
had hope for a better fate, for I thought it my 
desert ; the hope — whatever it be — that is grounded 
in desert, is just. 

63 To beguile a trustful maid is glory but cheaply 
earned ; my simple faith was worthy of regard. I was 
deceived by your words — I, who loved and was a 
woman. May the gods grant that this be your 
crowning praise ! In the midst of your city, even 
among the sons of Aegeus, go let yourself be statued, 
and let your mighty father* be set there first, with 
reeord of his deeds. When men shall have read 
of Seiron, and of grim Procrustes, and of Sinis, and 
of the mingled form of bull and man, and of Thebes 
brought low in war, and of the rout of the two- 
framed Centaurs, and of the knocking at the gloomy 
palaee of the darksome god — after all these, under 
your own image let be inscribed these words : 

THIS IS 11 E WHOSE WILES BETRAYED Til E HOSTESS 
THAT LOVED HIM. 

Of all the great deeds in the long career of your 
sire, nothing has made impress upon your nature but 



OVID 



quod solum excusat, solum miraris in illo ; 

heredem patriae, perfide, fraudis agis. 
ilia — nec invideo — fruitur meliore marito 

inque capistratis tigribus alta sedet ; 80 
at mea despecti fugiunt conubia Thraces, 

quod ferar externum praeposuisse meis. 
atque aliquis "iam nunc doctas eat/' inquit, " Athenas; 

armiferam Thracen qui regat, alter erit. 
exitus acta probat." careat successibus, opto, 85 

quisquis ab eventu facta notanda putat ! 
at si nostra tuo spumescant aequora rerao, 

iam mihi, iam dicar consuluisse meis — 
sed neque consului, nec te mea regia tanget 

fessaque Bistonia membra lavabis aqua ! 90 
Ilia meis oculis species abeuntis inhaeret, 

cum premeret portus classis itura meos. 
ausus es amplecti colloque infusus amantis 

oscula per longas iungere pressa moras 
cumque tuis lacrimis lacrimas confundere nostras, 95 

quodque foret velis aura secunda, queri 
et mihi discedens suprema dicere voce : 

" Phylli, fac expectes Demophoonta tuum ! " 
Expectcm, qui me numquam visurus abisti ? 

expectem pelago vela negata meo ? 1 100 

1 So G o> : negante data Pa. : velane gatata meo P. 

a After Theseus' desertion of her, Ariadne was wedded to 
Bacchus, whose tigers and car she drives. 



26 



THE HEKOIDES II 



the leaving of his Cretan bride. The only deed 
that draws forth his excuse, that only you admire in 
him ; you act the heir to your father's guile, per- 
fidious one. She — and with no envy from me — 
enjoys now a better lord, and sits aloft behind 
her bridled tigers"; but me, the Thraeians whom 
I scorned will not now wed, for rumour declares I 
set a stranger before my countrymen. And some- 
one says : " Let her now away to learned Athens ; 
to rule in armour-bearing Thrace another shall be 
found. The event proves well the wisdom of her 
eourse." Let him come to naught, I pray, who 
thinks the deed should be condemned from its 
result. Ah, but if our seas should foam beneath 
your oar, then should I be said to have counselled 
well for myself, then well for my countrymen ; but I 
have neither counselled well, nor will my palace feel 
your presence more, nor will you bathe again your 
wearied limbs in the Bistonian wave ! 

91 Ever to my sight clings that vision of you as 
you went, what time your ships were riding the 
waters of my harbour, all ready to depart. You dared 
embrace me, and, with arms elose round the neck of 
her who loved you, to join your lips to mine in 
long and lingering kisses, to mingle with my tears 
your own, to complain because the breeze was 
favouring to your sails, and, as you left my side, to 
say for your last words : " Phyllis, remember well, 
expect your own Demophoon ! " 

99 And am I to expect, when you went forth with 
thought never to see me more ? Am I to expect the 
sails denied return to my seas ? And yet I do 

27 



OVID 



et tamen expecto — redeas modo serus amanti, 

nt tua sit solo tempore lapsa fides ! 
Quid precor infelix ? te iam tenet altera coniunx 

forsitan et, nobis qui male favit, amor ; 
utque tibi excidimus, nullam, puto, Phyllida nosti. 105 

ei mihi ! si, quae sim Phyllis et unde, rogas — 
quae tibi, Demophoon, longis erroribus acto 

Threicios portus hospitiumque dedi, 
cuius opes auxere meae, cui dives egenti 

munera multa dedi, multa datura fui ; 110 
quae tibi subieci latissima regna Lycurgi, 

nomine femineo vix satis apta regi, 
qua patet umbrosum Rhodope glacialis ad Haemum, 

et sacer admissas exigit Hebrus aquas, 
cui mea virginitas avibus libata sinistris 115 

castaque fallaci zona recincta manu ! 
pronuba Tisiphone thalamis ululavit in illis, 

et cecinit maestum devia carmen avis ; 
adfuit Allecto brevibus torquata colubris, 

suntque sepulcrali lumina mota face ! 120 
Maesta tamen scopulos fruticosaque litora calco 

quaeque patent oculis litora 1 lata meis. 
sive die laxatur humus, seu frigida lucent 

sidera, prospicio, quis freta ventus agat ; 
et quaecumque procul venientia lintea vidi, 125 

protinus ilia meos auguror esse deos. 

1 litora MSS.: aequora Aldus Pa. 



a A Fury, instead of Juno, patroness of marriage. 

28 



THE HE HO IDES II 



expect — ah, return only, though late, to her who 
loves you, and prove your promise false only for the 
time that you delay ! 

103 Why entreat, unhappy that 1 am ? It may be 
you are already won by another bride, and feel 
for her the love that favoured me but ill ; and 
since I have fallen from out your life, I feel you 
know Phyllis no more. Ah me ! if you ask who 1, 
Phyllis, am, and whenee — I am she, Demophoon, 
who, when you had been driven far in wanderings on 
the sea, threw open to you the havens of Thrace and 
welcomed you as guest, you, whose estate my own 
raised up, to whom in your need I in my plenty gave 
many gifts, and would have given many still ; I am 
she who rendered to you the broad, broad realms of 
Lveurgus, scarce meet to be ruled in a woman's 
name, where stretches iey Rhodope to Haemus with 
its shades, and sacred Hebrus drives his headlong- 
waters forth — to you, on whom mid omens all sinister 
my maiden innoeence was first bestowed, and whose 
guileful hand ungirdled my chaste zone ! Tisiphone 
was minister at that bridal, with shrieks," and the 
bird that shuns the light chanted her mournful 
note ; Allecto was there, with little serpents coiled 
about her neek, and the lights that waved were 
torehes of the tomb ! 

121 Heavy in soul, none the less do I tread the 
rocks and the thicket-covered strand, where'er the 
sea view opens broad before my eyes. Whether by 
day the soil is loosed by warmth, or whether con- 
stellations coldly shine, I look ever forth to see 
what wind doth sweep the straits ; and whatever 
sails I see approaching from afar, straightway I augur 
them the answer to my prayers. I rush forth to 



2 9 



OVID 

in freta procurro, vix me retinentibus undis, 

mobile qua primas porrigit aequor aquas, 
quo magis accedunt, minus et minus utilis adsto ; 

linquor et ancillis exeipienda cado. 130 
Est sinus, adduetos modice falcatus in arcus ; 

ultima praerupta cornua mole rigent. 
hinc mihi suppositas inmittere corpus in undas 

mens fuit ; et, quoniam fallere pergis, erit. 
ad tua me fluctus proiectam litora portent, 135 

occurramque oculis intumulata tuis ! 
duritia ferrum nt superes adamantaque teque, 

"non tibi sic," dices, " Phylli, sequendus eram ! " 
saepe venenorum sitis est mihi ; saepe cruenta 

traiectam gladio morte perire iuvat. 140 
colla quoque, infidis quia se nectenda lacertis 

praebuerunt, laqueis inplicuisse iuvat. 
stat nece matura tenerum pensare pudorem. 

in necis electu parva futura mora est. 
Inscribere meo causa invidiosa sepulcro. 145. 

aut hoc aut simili cannine notus eris : 

Phyllida Demophoon leto dedit hospes amantem ; 
ille necis causam praebuit, ipsa manum. 



THE HEROIDES II 



the waters, scarce halted by the waves where first 
the sea sends in its mobile tide. The nearer the 
sails advance, the less and less the strength that 
bears me up ; my senses leave me, and I fall, to be 
caught up by my handmaids' arms. 

131 There is a bay, whose bow-like lines are 
gently curved to sickle shape ; its outmost horns 
rise rigid and in roek-bound mass. To throw myself 
hence into the waves beneath has been my mind ; 
and, sinee you still pursue your faithless course, so 
shall it be. Let the waves bear me away, and cast 
me up on your shores, and let me meet your eyes 
untombed ! Though in hardness you be more than 
steel, than adamant, than your very self, you shall 
say : " Not so, Phyllis, should I have been followed 
by thee !" Oft do J long for poison; oft with the 
sword would I gladly pierce my heart and pour 
forth my blood in death. My neck, too, because 
once offered to the embrace of your false arms, I 
could gladly ensnare in the noose. My heart is 
fixed to die before my time, and thus make amends 
to tender purity. In the choosing of my death there 
shall be but small delay. 

145 On my tomb shall you be inscribed the hate- 
ful cause of my death, liy this, or by some similar 
verse, shall you be known : 

DEMOPHOON 'TWAS SENT PHYLLIS TO HE It DOOM ; 

HER GUEST WAS HE, SUE I.OVEU HIM WELL. 
HE WAS THE CAUSE THAT BROUGHT HER DEATH TO 
PASS ; 

II EH OWN THE 11 AND 1IV WHICH SHE FELL. 



3 1 



OVID 



III 

Briseis Achilli 

Quam legis, a rapta Briseide littera venit, 

vix bene barbarica Graeca notata manu. 
quascumque adspicies, lacrimae fecere lituras ; 

sed tamen et lacrimae pondera vocis habent. 
Si mihi pauea queri de te dominoque viroque 5 

fas est, de domino pauea viroque querar. 
non, ego poscenti quod sum cito tradita regi, 

culpa tua est — quamvis haec quoque culpa tua est ; 
nam simul Eurybates me Talthybiusque vocarunt, 

Eurybati data sum Talthybioque comes. 10 
alter in alterius iactantes lumina vultum 

quaerebant taciti, noster ubi esset amor. 
difFerri potui ; poenae mora grata fuisset. 

ei mihi ! discedens oscula nulla dedi ; 
at lacrimas sine fine dedi rupique capillos — 15 

infelix iterum sum mihi visa capi ! 
Saepe ego decepto volui custode reverti, 

sed, me qui timidam prenderet, 1 hostis erat. 
si progressa forem, caper er ne nocte timebam, 

quamlibet ad Priami miiinis itura nurum. 20 
Sed data sim, quia danda fui — tot noctibus absum 

nec repetor ; cessas, iraque lenta tua est. 

1 redderet Ehw. 

a Briseis was a captive from Lyrnesus, in Mysia. Iliad IX 
is the basis of this letter. 

6 Agamemnon forced Achilles to give up Briseis. Achilles 
having refused to aid the Greeks, Agamemnon sent an embassy 
to him, but the offended warrior scorned his advances. 



3- 



THE HEROIDES III 



III 

Briseis to Achilles 

From stolen Briseis is the -writing yon read, searee 
charactered in Greek by her barbarian hand. 
Whatever blots you shall see, her tears have made ; but 
tears, too, have none the less the weight of words. 

5 If 'tis right for me to utter brief eomplaint 
of you, my master and my beloved, of you, my 
master and my beloved, will I utter brief complaint. 
That 1 was all too quickly delivered over to the 
king at his demand is not your fault — yet this, 
too, is your fault ; for as soon as Eurybates and 
Talthybius eame to ask for me, to Eurybates was I 
given over, and to Talthybius, to go with them. 6 
Eaeh, casting eyes into the face of other, inquired 
in silenee where now was the love between us. My 
going might have been deferred ; a stay of my 
pain would have eased my heart. All me ! I had to 
go, and with no farewell kiss ; but tears without 
end I shed, and rent my hair — miserable me, I 
seemed a second time to suffer the eaptive's fate ! 

17 Oft have I wished to elude my guards and 
return to you ; but. the enemy was there, to seize 
upon a timid girl. Should I have gone far, I feared 
I should be taken in the night, and delivered over 
a gift to some one of the ladies of Priam's sons. 

21 But grant I was given up because I must be 
given — yet all these nights I am absent from your 
side, and not demanded back ; you delay, and your 



33 

i) 



OVID 



ipse Menoetiades turn, cum tradebar, in aurem 

" quid fles ? hie parvo tempore," dixit, "ens.'' 
Nee repetisse parum; pugnas, ne reddar, Achille! 25 

i nunc et cupidi nomen amantis habe ! 
venerunt ad te Telamone et Amyntore nati — 

ille gradu propior sanguinis, ille comes — 
Laertaque satus, per quos comitata redirem. 

auxerunt blandas grandia dona preces : 30 
viginti fulvos operoso ex acre lebetas, 

et tripodas septem pondere et arte pares ; 
addita sunt illis auri bis quinque talenta, 

bis sex adsueti vincere semper cqui, 
quodque supervacuum est, forma praestante puellae 35 

Lesbides, eversa corpora capta domo, 
cumque tot his — sed non opus est tibi coniuge — 
coniunx 

ex Agamemnoniis una puella tribus. 
si tibi ab Atride pretio redimenda fuissem, 

quae dare debueras, accipere ilia negas ! 40 
qua menu culpa fieri tibi vilis, Achille ? 

quo levis a nobis tarn cito fugit amor ? 
An miseros tristis fortuna tenaciter urget, 

nec venit inceptis mollior hora malis ? 1 
diruta Marte tuo Lyrnesia moenia vidi — 45 

et fueram patriae pars ego magna meae ; 
vidi consortes pariter generisque necisque 

tres cecidisse — tribus, quae mihi, mater erat ; 
vidi, quantus erat, fusum tellure cruenta 

pectora iactantem sanguinolenta virum. 50 

1 malis Lehrs Hous. Plan.: meis 3fSS. 
a Patroclus. 

34 



THE HEROIDES III 



anger is slow. Menoetius' son himself," at the time 
I was delivered up, whispered into my ear : "Why 
do you weep? But a short time," he said, "will you 
be here." 

,J5 And not to have claimed me back is but a 
slight thing ; you even oppose my being restored, 
Achilles. Go now, deserve the name of an eager 
lover ! There came to you the sons of Amyntor 
and Telamon — the one near in degree of blood, 
the other a eomrade — and Laertes' son ; in company 
of these I was to return. Rich presents lent 
weight to their wheedling prayers : twenty ruddy 
vessels of wrought bronze, and tripods seven, equal 
in weight and workmanship ; added to these, 
of gold twice five talents, twice six coursers ever 
wont to win, and — what there was no need of ! 
— Lesbian girls surpassing fair, maids taken when 
their home was overthrown ; and with all these 
— though of a bride you have no need — as bride, 
one of the daughters three of Agamemnon. What 
you must have given had you had to buy me back 
from Atrides with a priee, that you refuse as a gift! 
What have I done that I am held thus cheap by you, 
Achilles ? Whither has fled your light love so 
quickly from me ? 

43 Or can it be that a gloomy fortune still weighs 
the wretched down, and a gentler hour comes not 
when woes have once begun ? The walls of Lyrnesus 
I have seen laid in ruin by your soldier band — I, 
who myself had been great part of my father's land ; 
I have seen fall three who were partners alike in 
birth and in death — and the three had the mother 
who was mine ; I have seen my wedded lord stretched 
all his length upon the gory ground, heaving in agony 



35 

i) 2 



OVID 



tot tamen amissis te conpensavimus iinuni ; 

tu dominus, tu vir, tu mi hi frater eras, 
tu mihi, iuratus per numina matris aquosae, 

utile dicebas ipse fuisse capi — 
scilicet ut, quamvis veniam dotata, repellas 55 

et mecum fugias quae tibi dantur opes ! 
quin etiam fama est, cum crastina fulserit Eos, 

te dare nubiferis lintea velle Notis. 
Quod scelus ut pavidas miserae mihi contigit aures, 

sanguinis atque animi pectus inane fuit. 60 
ibis et — o miseram ! — cui me, violente, 1 relinquis ? 

quis mihi desertae mite levamen erit ? 
devorer ante, precor, subito telluris hiatu 

aut rutilo missi fulminis igne cremer, 
quam sine me Phthiis canescant aequora remis, 65 

et videam puppes ire relicta tuas ! 
si tibi iam reditusque placent patriique Penates, 

non ego sum classi sarcina magna tuae. 
victorem captiva sequar, non nupta maritime; 

est mihi, quae lanas molliat, apta manus. 70 
inter Achaeiadas longe pulcherrima matres 

in thalamos coniunx ibit eatque tuos, 
digna nurus socero, lovis Aeginaeque nepote, 

cuique senex Nereus prosocer esse velit. 
nos humiles famulaeque tuae data pensa trahemus, 75 

et minuent plenos stamina nostra colos. 

1 tu lente Bent. 

" Pelens, son of Aeacus, son of Jupiter and Aegina. 
* Thetis, mother of Achilles, was daughter of Nereus. 

36 



HEROIDES III 



his bloody breast. For so many lost to me 1 still 
had only you in recompense ; you were my master, 
you my husband, you my brother. You swore to 
me by the godhead of your seaborn mother, and 
yourself said that my captive's lot was gain — yes, that 
though I eome to you with dowry, you may thrust 
me back, scorning with me the wealth that is 
tendered you ! Nay, 'tis even said that when to- 
morrow's dawn shall have shone forth, you mean to 
unfurl your linen sails to the cloud-bringing winds of 
the south. 

59 When the monstrous tale fell on my wretched 
and terror-stricken ears, the blood went from my 
breast, and with it my senses fled. You are going — 
ah me, wretehed ! — and to whom do you leave me, O 
hardened of heart ? Who shall a fiord me gentle 
solaee, left behind ? May I be swallowed up, I pray, 
in sudden yawning of the earth, or consumed by 
the ruddy fire of careering thunderbolt, e'er that, 
without me, the seas foam white with P-hthian 
oars, and I am left behind to see your ships fare 
forth ! If it please you now to return to the hearth 
of your fathers, I am no great burden to your 
fleet. As captive let me follow my captor, not as 
wife my wedded lord ; I have a hand well skilled 
to dress the wool. The most beauteous by far 
among the women of Aehaea will come to the 
marriage-chamber as your bride — and may she eome ! 
— a bride worthy of her lord's father," the grandchild 
of Jove and Acgina, and one whom aneient Nereus 
would welcome as his grandson's bride. 6 As for 
me, I shall be a lowly slave of yours and spin off the 
given task, and the full distaff shall grow slender at 
the drawing of my threads. Only let not your lady 



37 



OVID 



exagitet ne me tantum tua, deprecor, uxor — 

quae mini nescio quo non erit aequa modo — 
neve meos coram seindi patiare capillos 

et leviter dieas : " haec quoque nostra fuit." 80 
vel patiare licet, dum ne contempta relinquar — 

hie mihi vae ! miserae concutit ossa metus. 
Quid tamen expectas ? Agamemnona paenitet irae, 

et iacet ante tuos Graecia maesta pedes, 
vince animos iramque tuam, qui cetera vincis ! 85 

quid lacerat Danaas inpiger Hector opes ? 
arma cape, Aeacide, sed me tamen ante recepta, 

et preme turbatos Marte favente viros ! 
propter me mota est, propter me desinat ira, 

simque ego tristitiae causa modusque tuae. 90 
nec tibi turpe puta preeibus succumbere nostris ; 

coniugis Oenides versus in arma prece est. 
res audita mihi, nota est tibi. fratribus orba 

devovit nati spemque caputque parens, 
helium erat ; ille ferox positis secessit ah armis 95 

et patriae rigida mente negavit opem. 
sola virum coniunx flexit. felicior ilia ! 

at mea pro 1 nullo pondere verba cadunt. 
nec tamen indignor nec me pro coniuge gessi 

saepius in domini serva vocata torum. 100 
me quaedam, memini, dominam captiva vocabat. 

" servitio/' dixi, " nominis addis onus." 
Per tamen ossa viri subito male tecta sepulcro, 

semper iudiciis ossa verenda meis ; 

1 pro ! Madv. 

a The story of Meleager, who slew his mother Althea's 
brother, and was cursed by her. Refusing to aid his country 
in the war that followed the killing of the Calydonian boar, 
he was turned from his purpose by his wife Cleopatra. 

3 8 



THE HEROIDES III 



be harsh with me, I pray — for in some way 1 feel 
she will not be kind — and suffer her not to tear my 
hair before your eyes, while you lightly say of nie : 
" She, too, once was mine." Or, suffer it even so, 
if only 1 am not despised and left behind — this is 
the fear, ah woe is wretched me, that shakes my 
very bones ! 

83 What do you still await ? Agamemnon repents 
him of his wrath, and Greeee lies prostrate in 
afflietion at your feet. Subdue your own angry 
spirit, you who subdue all else ! Why does eager 
Hector still harry the Danaan lines? Seize up your 
armour, O child of Aeaeus — yet take me back first 
— and with the favour of Mars rout and overwhelm 
their ranks. For me your anger was stirred, through 
me let it be allayed ; and let me be both the cause 
and the measure of your gloomy wrath. Nor think 
it unseemly for you to yield to prayer of mine ; by 
the prayer of his wedded wife was the son of Oeneus 
roused to arms." 'Tis only a tale to me, but to you 
well known. Reft of her brothers, a mother eursed 
the hope and head of her son. There was war ; 
in fieree mood he laid down his arms and stood 
apart, and with unbending purpose refused his country 
aid. Only the wife availed to bend her husband. 
The happier she ! — for my words have no weight, 
and fall for naught. And yet I am not angered, nor 
have I borne myself as wife beeause oft summoned, 
a slave, to share my master's bed. Some eaptive 
woman onee, I mind me, called me mistress. " To 
slavery," I replied, " you add a burden in that 
name." 

103 N 011 e the less, by the bones of my wedded lord, 
ill covered in hast}' sepulture bones ever to be 



OVID 



perque trium fortes animas^ mea minima^ fratrum, 105 

qui bene pro patria cum patriaque iacent ; 
perque tuum nostrumque caput, quae iunximus una^ 

perque tuos enses., cognita tela meis — 
nulla Mycenaeum sociasse cubilia mecum 

iuro ; fallentem deseruisse velis ! 110 
si tibi nunc dicam : " fortissinie, tu quoque iura 

nulla tibi sine me gaudia facta ! " neges. 
at Danai maerere putant — tibi plectra moventurj 

te tenet in tepido mollis arnica sinu ! 
et quisquam 1 quaerit, quare pugnare recuses? 115 

pugna nocet, citharae noxque Venusque iuvant. 
tutius est iacuisse toro, tenuisse puellam, 

Threiciam digitis increpuisse lyrarn, 
quam manibus clipeos et acutae cuspidis hastanij 

et galeam pressa sustinuisse coma. 120 
Sed tibi pro tutis insignia facta placebant, 

partaque bellando gloria dulcis erat. 
an tantum dum me caperes, fera bella probabas, 

cumque mea patria laus tua victa iacet ? 
di melius! validoque, precox vibrata lacerto 125 

transeat Hectoreum Pelias hasta latus ! 
mittite me ; Danai ! dominum legata rogabo 

multaque mandatis oscula mixta feram. 
plus ego quam Phoenix, plus quam facundus Ulixes, 

plus ego quam Teucrr, credite, frater again. 130 

1 So O : si quisquam (quisquis ?) P : et si quis w : et quis- 
(|nis y : si quis nunc quaerat or si quis forte roget Bent. 

a Because Orpheus was a Thracian. 

* Ajax. The three were the delegation sent by Agamem- 
non to offer to make amends. 



40 



THE HEROIDES III 



held sacred in my eyes ; and by the brave souls of 
my three brothers, to me now spirits divine, who 
died well for their country, and lie well with it 
in death ; and by your head and mine, which we 
have laid each to each ; and by your sword, weapon 
well known to my kin — I swear that the Mycenaean 
has shared no couch with me ; if I prove false, 
wish never to see me more ! If now I should say 
to you : " Most valiant one, do you swear also that 
you have tasted no joys apart from me ! " you 
would refuse. Yes, the Danai think you are 
mourning for me — but you are wielding the plectrum, 
and a tender mistress holds you in her warm 
embrace ! And does anyone ask wherefore do you 
refuse to fight? Because the fight brings danger; 
while the zither, and night, and Venus, bring 
delight. Safer is it to lie on the couch, to clasp a 
sweetheart in your arms, to tinkle with your fingers 
the Thracian a lyre, than to take in hand the shield, 
and the spear with sharpened point, and to sustain 
upon your locks the helmet's weight. 

121 Once the deed of renown, rather than safety, 
was your pleasure, and glory won in warring was 
sweet to you. Or can it be that you favoured fierce 
war only till you could make ine captive, and that your 
praise lies dead, o'ereome together with my native 
land ? Ye gods forfend ! and may the spear of 
Pelion go quivering from your strong arm to pierce 
the side of Hector ! Send me, O Danai ! I 
will be ambassadress and supplicate my lord, and 
carry many kisses mingled with my message. I shall 
achieve more than Phoenix, believe me, more than 
eloquent Ulysses, more than Teueer's brother! 6 It 



41 



OVID 



est aliquidj collum solitis tetigisse lacertis, 

])raesentisque oculos admonuisse sinu. 1 
sis licet inmitis matrisque ferocior undiSj 

ut taceain, laerimis conmimiere meis. 
Nunc quoque — sic onmes Peleus pater inpleat 

annoSj 135 

sic eat auspiciis Pyrrhus ad arma tuis ! — 
respice sollicitam Briseida, fortis Achille, 

nee miseram lenta ferreus ure mora ! 
aut, si versus amor tuus est in taedia nostri, 

quam sine te cogis vivere, coge mori ! 140 
utque facisj coges. abiit corpusque colorque; 

sustinet hoc animae spes tamen una tui. 
qua si destituor, repetam fratresque virunique — 

nec tibi magnificum femina iussa mori. 
cur autem iubeas ? stricto pete corpora ferro ; 145 

est mihi qui fosso pectore sanguis eat. 
me petat ille tnus, qui^ si dea passa fuisset, 

ensis in Atridae pectus iturus erat ! 
A, potius serves nostram^ tua munera, vitam ! 

quod dederas hosti victor, arnica rogo. 150 
perdere quos melius possiSj Neptunia praebent 

Pergama ; materiam caedis ab hoste pete, 
me modo^ sive paras inpellere remige classem, 

sive manes, domini iure venire iube ! 

1 sinu E to; sinus y : suis P. 

42 



THE HERO IDES III 



will avail something to have touehed your neck with 
the accustomed arms, to have seen you and stirred 
your reeolleetion by the sight of my bosom. Though 
you be cruel, though more savage than your mother's 
waves, even should 1 keep silenee you will be broken 
by my tears. 

135 Even now — so may Peleus your father fill out 
his tale of years, so may Pyrrhus take up arms with 
fortune as good as yours ! — have regard for anxious 
Briseis, brave Achilles, and do not hard-heartedly 
torment a wretched maid with long drawn out 
delay ! Or, if your love for me has turned to 
weariness, compel the death of her whom you compel 
to live without you ! And, as you now are doing, 
you will compel it. Gone is my flesh, and gone my 
colour ; what spirit I still have is but sustained by 
hope in you. If I am left by that, I shall go to 
rejoin my brothers and my husband — and 'twill be 
no boast for you to have bid a woman die. And 
more, why should you bid me die ? Draw the steel 
and plunge it in my body ; I have blood to flow 
when once my breast is pierced. Let me be stricken 
with that sword of yours, which, had the goddess 
not said nay, would have made its way into the 
heart of Atreus' son ! 

149 Ah, rather save my life, the gift you gave me ! 
What you gave, when victor, to me your foe, I ask 
now from you as your friend. Those whom 'twere 
better you destroyed, Neptunian Pergamum affords ; 
for matter for your sword, go seek the foe. Only, 
whether you make ready to speed on with the oar 
your ships, or whether you remain, O, by your right 
as master, bid me come ! 



43 



OVID 



IV 

Phaedra Hippolyto 

Quam nisi tu dederis, caritura est ipsa, salutem 

mittit Amazonio Cressa puella viro. 
perlege, quodcumque est — quid epistula lecta nocebit ? 

te quoque in hac aliquid quod iuvet esse potest ; 
his arcana notis terra pelagoque feruntur. 5 

inspicit acceptas hostis ab hoste notas. 
Ter tecum conata loqui ter inutilis haesit 

lingua, ter in primo destitit ore sonus. 
qua licet et sequitur, pudor est miscendus amori ; 

dicere quae puduit, scribere iussit amor. 10 
quidquid Amor iussit, non est contemnere tutum ; 

regnat et in dominos ius habet ille deos. 
ille mihi primo dubitanti scribere dixit : 

"scribe! dabit victas ferreus ille manus." 
adsit et, ut nostras avido fovet igne medullas, 15 

figat sic animos in mea vota tuos ! 
Non ego nequitia socialia foedera rumpam ; 

fama — velim quaeras — crimine nostra vacat. 
venit amor gravius, quo serius — urimur intus ; 

urimur, et caecum pectora vulnus habent. 20 

44 



THE HEROIDES IV 



IV 

Phaedra to Hipuolvtus 

With wishes for the welfare which she herself, 
unless you give it her, will ever lack, the Cretan 
maid greets the hero whose mother was an Amazon. 
Read to the end, whatever is here contained — what 
shall reading of a letter harm ? In this one, too, 
there may be something to pleasure you ; in these 
characters of mine, seerets are borne over land and 
sea. Even foe looks into missive writ by foe. 

7 Thriee making trial of speech with you, thrice 
hath my tongue vainly stopped, thriee the sound 
failed at first threshold of my lips. Wherever 
modesty may attend on love, love should not lack in 
it; with me, what modesty forbade to say, love 
has commanded me to write. Whatever Love com- 
mands, it is not safe to hold for naught ; his 
throne and law are over even the gods who are 
lords of all. 'Twas he who spoke to me when first I 
doubted if to write or no : " Write ; the iron- 
hearted one will yield his hand." Let him aid me, 
then, and, just as he heats my marrow with his 
avid name, so may he transfix your heart that it 
yield to my prayers ! 

17 It will not be through wanton baseness that I 
shall break my marriage-bond ; my name — and you 
may ask — is free from all reproaeh. Love has come 
to me, the deeper for its coining late — I am burning 
with love within ; I am burning, and my breast has 
an unseen wound. As the first bearing of the yoke 



45 



OVID 



scilicet ut teneros laedunt iuga prima iuvencos, 

frenaque vix patitur de gvege captus equus, 
sic male vixque subit primos rude pectus amores, 

sarcinaque haec animo non sedet apta meo. 
ars fit, ubi a teneris crimen condiscitur annis ; 

quae 1 venit exacto tempore, peius amat. 
tu nova servatae carpes libamina famae, 

et pariter nostrum fiet uterque nocens. 
est aliquid, plenis pomaria carpere ramis, 

et tenui primam delegere ungue rosam. 
si tamen ille prior, quo me sine crimine gessi, 

candor ab insolita labe notandus erat, 
at bene successit, digno quod adurimur igni ; 

peius adulterio turpis adulter obest. 
si mihi concedat Iuno fratremque virumque, 

Hippolytum videor praepositura Iovi! 
Iam quoque — vix credes — ignotas mutor in artes 

est mihi per saevas impetus ire feras. 
iam mihi prima dea est arcu praesignis adunco 

Delia ; iudicium subsequor ipsa tuum. 
in nemus ire libet pressisque in retia cervis 

hortari celeris per iuga summa canes, 
aut tremulum excusso iaculum vibrare lacerto, 

aut in graminea ponere corpus humo. 
saepe iuvat versare leves in pulvere currus 

torquentem frenis ora fugacis equi ; 
nunc feror, ut Bacchi furiis Eleleides 2 actae, 

3 quaeque sub Idaeo tympana colle movent, 

1 cui Ilein. Bent. 2 Elelegides P : Eleides/ y. 
3 48-103 lost from P. 

46 



THE HEROIDES IV 



galls the tender steer, and as the rein is scarce 
endured by the colt fresh taken from the drove, so 
does my untried heart rebel, and scarce submit to 
the first restraints of love, and the burden I undergo 
does not sit well upon my soul. Love grows to be 
but an art, when the fault is well learned from 
tender years ; she who yields her heart when the 
time for love is past, has a fiercer passion. You 
will reap the fresh first-offerings of purity long 
preserved, and both of us will be equal in our guilt. 
'Tis something to pluck fruit from the orchard with 
full-hanging branch, to cull with delicate nail the 
first rose. If nevertheless the white and blameless 
purity in which I have lived before was to be marked 
with unwonted stain, at least the fortune is kind 
that burns me with a worthy flame ; worse than 
forbidden love is a lover who is base. Should 
Juno yield me him who is at once her brother 
and her lord, metliinks I should prefer Hippolytus 
to Jove. 

37 Now too — you will scarce believe it — I am 
changing to pursuits I did not know ; I am stirred 
to go among wild beasts. The goddess first for me 
now is the Del ism, known above all for her curved 
bow; it is your choice that 1 myself now follow. 
My pleasure leads me to the wood, to drive the 
deer into the net, and to urge on the fleet hound 
over the highest ridge, or with arm shot forth to let 
fly the quivering spear, or to lay my body upon the 
grassy ground. Oft do I delight to whirl the light 
car in the dust of the course, twisting with the 
rein the mouth of the flying steed ; now again 
I am borne on, like daughters of the Hacchic cry 
driven by the frenzy of their god, and those who 



47 



OVID 



aut quas semideae Dryades Faunique bicornes 

numine contactas attonuere suo. 50 
namque mihi referunt, cum se furor ille remisit, 

omnia ; me tacitam conscius urit amor. 
Forsitau hunc generis fato reddamus amorem, 

et Venus ex tota gente tributa petat. 
Iuppiter Europen — prima est ea gentis origo — 55 

dilexit, taui-o dissimulante deum. 
Pasiphae mater, decepto subdita tauro, 

enixa est utero crimen onusque suo. 
perfidus Aegides, ducentia fila secutus, 

curva meae fugit tecta sororis ope. 60 
en, ego nunc, ne forte parum Minoia credar, 

in socias leges ultima gentis eo ! 
hoc quoque fatale est : placuit domus una duabus ; 

me tua forma capit, capta parente soror. 
Thesides Theseusque duas rapuere sorores — 65 

ponite de nostra bina tropaea domo ! 
Tempore quo nobis inita est Cerealis Eleusin, 

Gnosia me vellem detinuisset humus ! 
tunc mihi praecipue, nec non tamen ante, placebas ; 

acer in extremis ossibus haesit amor. 70 
Candida vestis erat, praecincti flore capilli, 

flava verecundus tinxerat ora rubor, 
quemque vocant aliae vultum rigidumque trucemque, 

pro rigido Phaedra iudice fortis erat. 
sint procul a nobis iuvenes ut femina compti ! — 75 

fine coli modico forma virilis amat. 

° The votaries of Cybele, Great Mother of the Gods. 

6 The gods caused the animal to see in her his own kind. 

c The story of the Minotaur and the Labyrinth. 



4S 



THE HEROIDES IV 



shake the timbrel at the foot of Ida's ridge," 1 or 
those whom Dryad creatures half-divine and Fauns 
two-horned have touched with their own spirit 
and driven distraught. For they tell me of all these 
things when that madness of mine has passed 
away ; and I keep silence, conscious 'tis love that 
tortures me. 

53 It may he this love is a debt I am paying, 
due to the destiny of my line, and that Venus is 
exacting tribute of me for all my race. Europa — 
this is the first beginning of our line — was loved 
of Jove ; a bull's form disguised the god. Pasiphae 
my mother, victim of the deluded bull/ brought forth 
in travail her reproach and burden. The faithless 
son of Aegeus followed the guiding thread, and 
escaped from the winding house through the aid my 
sister gave." Behold, now I, lest I be thought 
too little a child of Minos' line, am the latest of 
my stock to come under the law that rules us all ! 
This, too, is fateful, that one house has won us both ; 
your beauty has captured my heart, my sister's 
heart was captured bv your father. Theseus' son 
and Theseus have been the undoing of sisters 
twain — rear ye a double trophy at our house's fall ! 

67 That time 1 went to Eleusis, the city of Ceres, 
would that the Gnosian land had held me back ! It 
was then you pleased me most, and yet you had 
pleased before ; piercing love lodged in my deepest 
bones. Shining white was vour raiment, bound round 
with flowers your locks, the blush of modesty had 
tinged your sun-browned cheeks, and, what others 
call a countenance hard and stern, in Phaedra's eye 
was strong instead of hard. Away from me with your 
young men arrayed like women ! — beauty in a man 



49 

K 



OVID 



te tuns iste rigor positique sine arte capilli 

et levis egregio pulvis in ore decet. 
sive ferocis equi luctantia colla recurvas, 

exiguo flexos miror in orbe pedes ; 80 
sen lentuni valido torques hastilc laeerto, 

ora ferox in se versa lacertus habet., 
sive tenes lato venabula cornea ferro. 

denique nostra iuvat 1 lumina, quidquid agis. 
Tu modo duritiam silvis depone iugosis ; 85 

non sum militia 2 digna perire tua. 
quid iuvat incinctae studia exercere Dianae, 

et Veneri numeros eripuisse suos ? 
quod caret alterna requie, durabile non est ; 

haec reparat vires fessaque membra novat. 90 
arcus — et anna tuae tibi sunt imitanda Diauae — 

si numquam cesses tendere, mollis erit. 
clarus erat silvis Cephalus^ multaeque per herbas 

conciderant illo percutiente ferae ; 
nec tamen Aurorae male se praebebat amandum. 95 

ibat ad lmnc sapiens a sene diva viro. 
saepe sub ilicibus Venerem Cinvraque creatum 

sustinuit positos quaelibet herba duos, 
arsit et Oenides in Maenalia Atalanta ; 

ilia ferae spolium pignus amoris habet. 100 
nos quoque iam primum turba numeremur in ista ! 

si Venerem tollas, rustica silva tua est. 
ipsa comes venianr, nec me latebrosa movebunt 

saxa neque obliquo dente timendus a per. 

1 iuvat E co Plan. : iuvas ai vidg. 

2 materia MSS. : militia Pa. : materias digna vigore tuo 
Bent.: duritia Faber. 



Tithonus. 



* Adonis. 



THE HEROIDES IV 



would fain be striven for in measure. That hardness 
of feature suits you well, those locks that fall without 
art, and the light dust upon your handsome faee. 
Whether you draw rein and curb the resisting neck 
of your spirited steed, I look with wonder at your 
turning his feet in circle so slight ; whether with 
strong arm you hurl the pliant shaft, your gallant 
arm draws my regard upon itself, or whether you 
grasp the broad-headed cornel hunting-spear. To sav 
no more, my eyes delight in whatsoe'er you do. 

S5 Do you only lay aside your hardness upon the 
forest ridges ; I am no fit spoil for your campaign. 
What use to you to practise the ways of girded 
Diana, and to have stolen from Venus her own 
due? That which lacks its alternations of repose 
will not endure ; this is what repairs the strength 
and renews the wearied limbs. The bow — and you 
should imitate the weapons of your Diana — if you 
never cease to bend it, will grow slack. Renowned 
in the forest was Cephalus, and many were the wild 
beasts that had fallen on the sod at the piercing 
of his stroke ; yet he did not ill in yielding himself 
to Aurora's love. Oft did the goddess sagely go to 
him, leaving her aged spouse." Many a time beneath 
the ilex did Venus and he 6 that was sprung of Cinyras 
recline, pressing some chance grassy spot. The son 
of Oeneus, too, took fire with love for Maenalian 
Atalanta ; she has the spoil of the wild beast as the 
pledge of his love. * Let us, too, be now first 
numbered in that company! If you take away love, 
the forest is but a rustic plaee. I myself will come 
and be at your side, and neither rocky covert shall 
make me fear, nor the boar dreadful for the side- 
stroke of his tusk. 



5' 

K 2 



OVID 



Aequora bina suis obpugnant fluctibus isthmon, 105 

et tenuis tellus audit utrumque mare, 
hie tecum Troezena colam ; Pittheia regna ; 

iam nunc est patria gratior ilia mea. 
tempore abest aberitque dni Neptunius beros ; 

ilium Pirithoi detinet ora sui. 110 
praeposuit Theseus — nisi si 1 manifesta negamus — 

Pirithoum Phaedrae Piritboumque tibi. 
sola nec baec ad nos iniuria venit ab illo ; 

in magnis laesi rebus uterque sumus. 
ossa mei fratris clava perfracta trinodi 115 

sparsit bumi ; soror est praeda relicta feris. 
prima securigeras inter virtute puellas 

te peperit, nati digna vigore parens ; 
si quaeras, ubi sit — Theseus latus ense peregit, 

nec tanto mater pignore tuta fuit. 120 
at ne mipta quidem taedaque aceepta iugali — 

cur, nisi ne caperes regna paterna nothus ? 
addidit et fratres ex me tibi, quos tamen omnis 

non ego tollendi causa, sed ille fuit. 

utinam nocitura tibi, pulcberrime rerum, 125 
in medio nisu viscera rupta forent ! 

1 nunc, sic meriti lectum reverere parentis — 

quern fugit et factis abdicat ipse suis ! 
Nec, quia privigno videar coitura noverca, 

terruerint animos nomina vana tuos. 130 
1 nisi si Hem.: nisi P :.nisi nos Goi. 

" The king of the Lapithae, Theseus' companion on the 
expedition to Hades, aided bj 7 him in the war against the 
Centaurs. 

* Antiope, sister of Hippolyte, is here meant ; but the 
usual story made Hippolyte Theseus' mother. 

c Palmer makes Hippolytus the antecedent of quem. 



52 



THE HEROIDES IV 



105 There are two seas that on either side assail an 
isthmus with their floods, and the slender land hears 
the waves of both. Here with you will I dwell, in 
Troezen's land, the realm of Pittheus ; yon place is 
dearer to me now than my own native soil. The 
hero son of Neptune is absent now, in happy hour, 
and will be absent long; he is kept by the shores of 
his dear Pirithous." Theseus — unless, indeed, we 
refuse to own what all may see — has come to love 
Pirithous more than Phaedra, Pirithous more than 
you. Nor is that the only wrong we suffer at his 
hand ; there are deep injuries we both have had 
from him. The bones of my brother he erushed 
with his triple-knotted ehib and scattered o'er the 
ground ; my sister he left at the mercy of wild 
beasts. The first in courage among the women h of 
the battle-axe bore you, a mother worthy of the 
vigour of her son ; if you ask where she is — Theseus 
pierced her side with the steel, nor did she find 
safety in the pledge of so great a son. Yes, and she 
was not even wed to him and taken to his home 
with the nuptial torch — why, unless that you, a 
bastard, should not come to your father's throne ? He 
has bestowed brothers on you, too^ from me, and the 
cause of rearing them all as heirs has been not 
myself, but he. Ah, would that the bosom which 
was to work you wrong, fairest of men, had been 
rent in the midst of its throes ! Go now, reverence 
the bed of a father who thus deserves of you — the 
bed c which he neglects and is disowning by his 
deeds. 

l ' 29 And, should you think of me as a stepdame 
who would mate with her husband's son, let empty 
names fright not your soul. Such old-fashioned 



53 



OVID 



ista vetus pietas, aevo moritura futuro, 

rustica Saturno regna tenente fait. 
Iuppiter esse piura statuit, quodcumque iuvaret, 

et fas omne facit fratre marita soror. 
ilia coit firma generis iunctura catena, 135 

inposuit nodos cai Venus ipsa suos. 
nec labor est celare — licet ; pete raunus ab ilia ; 1 

cognato poterit nomine culpa tegi. 
viderit amplexos aliquis, laudabimur ambo ; 

dicar privigno fida noverca meo. 140 
non tibi per tenebras duri reseranda mariti 

ianua, non custos decipiendus erit ; 
ut tenuit domus una duos, domus una tenebit ; 

oscula aperta dabas, oscula aperta dabis ; 
tutus eris mecum laudemque merebere culpa, 145 

tu licet in lecto conspiciare meo. 
tolle moras tantum properataque foedera iunge — 

qui mihi nunc saevit, sic tibi parcat Amor ! 
non ego dedignor supplex humilisque precari. 

heu ! ubi nunc fastus altaque verba? iacent ! 150 
et pugnare diu nec me submittere culpae 

certa fui— certi siquid haberet amor ; 
victa precor genibusque tuis regalia tendo 

bracchia ! quid deceat, non videt ullus amans. 
depuduit, profugusque pudor sua signa reliquit. 2 155 

Da veniam fassae duraque corda doma ! 
quod mihi sit genitor, qui possidet aequora, Minos, 

quod veniant proavi fulmina torta manu, 

1 licet pete munns ab ilia MSS. : licet ; pete munus ! ab ilia 
Ehw. : licet peccemiis, amorem Pa. Sedl. : celare virum ; 
pete mxmus ab illo'j5e?i/. : celare ; licet ; pete munus ab ipsa 
Madr.: etc. 2 relinquit Ps. 

54 



THE HEROIDES IV 



regard for virtue was rustic even in Saturn's reign, 
and doomed to die in the age to come. Jove fixed 
that virtue was to be in whatever brought us 
pleasure ; and naught is wrong before the gods since 
sister was made wife by brother. That bond of 
kinship only holds close and firm in which Venus 
herself has forged the chain. Nor need you fear the 
trouble of concealment — it will be easy ; ask the aid 
of Venus ! Through her our fault will be covered 
under name of kinship. Should someone see us 
embrace, we both shall meet with praise ; I shall be 
called a faithful stepdame to the son of my lord. 
No portal of a dour husband will need unbolting 
for you in the darkness of night ; there will be 
no guard to be eluded ; as the same roof has covered 
us both, the same will cover us still. Your wont has 
been to give me kisses unconcealed, your wont will 
be still to give me kisses unconcealed. You will be 
safe with me, and will earn praise by your fault, 
though you be seen upon my very couch. Only, 
away with tarrying, and make haste to bind our 
bond — so may Love be merciful to you, who is 
bitter to me now ! 1 do not disdain to bend my 
knee and humbly make entreaty. Alas ! where 
now are my pride, my lofty words ? Fallen ! I 
was resolved — if there was aught love could resolve 
— both to fight long and not to yield to fault ; but I 
am overcome. 1 pray to you, to clasp your knees I 
extend my queenly arms. Of what befits, no one 
who loves takes thought. My modesty has fled, and 
as it fled it left its standards behind. 

156 p ori irive me my confession, and soften your hard 
heart ! That I have for sire Minos, who rules the 
seas, that from my ancestor's hand conies hurled the 



55 



OVID 



quod sit avus radiis frontem vallatus acutiSj 

purpureo tepidum qui movet axe diem — 160 
nobilitas sub amove iaeet ! miserere priorum 

et, mihi si non vis pareere, paree meis ! 
est mihi dotalis tellus Iovis insula, Crete — 

serviat Hippolyto regia tota meo ! 
Flecte, feroXj 1 ammos ! potuit eorrumpere taurum 165 

mater ; eris tauro saevior ipse truei ? 
per Venerem, parcas, oro, quae plurima mecum est ! 

sic numquairjj quae te spernere possit, ames ; 
sic tibi secretis agilis dea saltibus adsit, 

silvaque perdendas praebeat alta feras ; 170 
sic faveant Satyri montanaque numiua Panes, 

et cadat adversa cuspide fossus aper ; 
sie tibi dent Nymphae, quamvis odisse puellas 

diceris, arentem quae levet unda sitim ! 
Addimus his preeibus lacrimas quoque ; verba 
precautis 175 

perlegis et laerimas fiuge videre meas ! 

V 

Oenone Paridi 2 

Perlegis ? an eoniunx prohibet nova ? perlege — 
non est 

ista Mycenaea littera facta manu ! 

1 ferox P s : feros P 2 a> vitlg. 

2 Introductory couplets found in V-XI1, XVII, XX, XXI, 
are omitted by Plan, and condemned by Pa. Mcrk. et al. 

56 



THE HERO IDES V 



lightning-stroke, that the front of my grand si re, he 
who moves the tepid day with gleaming chariot, is 
crowned with palisade of pointed rays — what of this, 
when my noble name is prostrate under love? Have 
pity on those who have gone before, and, if me vou 
will not spare, O spare my line ! To my dowrv 
belongs the Cretan land, the isle of Jove — let my 
whole eourt be slaves to my Hippolytus! 

165 Bend, O eruel one, your spirit ! My mother 
could pervert the bull ; will you be fiercer than a 
savage beast? Spare me, by Venus I pray, who is 
ehiefest with me now. So may you never love one 
who will spurn you ; so may the agile goddess wait on 
you in the solitary glade to keep you safe, and the 
deep forest yield you wild beasts to slay ; so may the 
Satyrs be your friends, and the mountain deities, the 
Pans, and may the boar fall pierced in full front by 
your spear ; so may the Nymphs — though you are said 
to loathe womankind — give you the Mowing water to 
relieve your parehing thirst ! 

175 I mingle with these prayers my tears as well. 
The words of her who prays, vou are reading ; her 
tears, imagine you behold ! 

V 

Oenoxe to Paris 

Will you read my letter through ? or does your 
new wife forbid ? Read — this is no letter writ by 
Mycenaean hand !" It is the fountain-nymph Oenone 

° She taunts Paris with fear of Agamemnon ami Menc- 
laus. 



57 



OVID 



Pegasis Oenone, Phrygiis celeberrima silvis, 

laesa queror de te, si sinis, ipsa meo. 
Quis dens opposuit nostris sua numina votis ? 5 

ne tua permaneam, quod mihi crimen obest? 
leniter, ex raerito quidquid patiare, ferendum est ; 

quae venit indigno poena, dolenda venit. 
Nonduni tantus eras, cum te contenta marito 

edita de magno flumine nymplia fui. 10 
qui nunc Priamides — absit reverentia vero ! — 

servus eras ; servo nubere n} T mpba tub ! 
saepe greges inter requievimus arbore tecti, 

mixtaque cum foliis praebuit berba torum ; 
saepe super stramen faenoque iacentibus alto 15 

defensa est humili cana pruina casa. 
quis tibi monstrabat saltus venatibus aptos, 

et tegeret catulos qua fera rupe suos ? 
retia saepe conies maculis distincta tetendi ; 

saepe citos egi per iuga longa canes. 20 
incisae servant a te raea nomina fagi, 

et legor oenoxe falce notata tua, 1 
et quantum trunci, tantum mea nomina crescunt. 25 

crescite et in titulos surgite recta meos ! 
popule, vive, precox quae consita margine ripae 

boc in rugoso cortice carmen babes : 

CUM PARIS OENONE POTERIT SPIRARE RELICT Aj 

AD FONTEM XANTHI VERSA RECURRET AQUA. 30 

1 vv. 23, 24 omitted as spiirioiis ATerk. : 

populus est, memini, pluviali consita rivo, 
est in qua nostri littera scripta memor. 
"there is a poplar, I mind me, planted on the banks of a 
stream, on which is written the legend that recalls our memory." 

58 



THE HEHOIDES V 



writes, well-known to the Phrygian forests— wronged, 
and with complaint to make of you, you my own, if 
you but allow. 

5 Wfyat god has set his will against my prayers ? 
What guilt stands in my way, that I may not remain 
your own ? Softly must we bear whatever suffering is 
our desert ; the penalty that eomes without deserving 
brings us dole. 

9 Not yet so great were you when I was content 
to wed you — I, the nymph-daughter of a mighty 
stream. You who are now a son of Priam — let not 
respect keep back the truth ! — were then a slave ; 
I deigned to wed a slave — I, a nymph ! Oft 
among our flocks have Ave reposed beneath the 
sheltering trees, where mingled grass and leaves 
afforded us a eoueh ; oft have we lain upon the 
straw, or on the deep hay in a lowly hut that kept the 
hoar-frost off. Who was it pointed out to you the 
eoverts apt for the ehase, and the rocky den where 
the wild beast hid away her cubs ? Oft have I gone 
with you to stretch the hunting-net with its wide 
mesh ; oft have I led the fleet hounds over the long 
ridge. The beeches still conserve my name carved on 
them by you, and I am read there oenone, charac- 
tered by your blade ; and the more the trunks, 
the greater grows my name. Grow on, rise high 
and straight to make my honours known ! O 
poplar, ever live, I pray, that art planted by the 
marge of the stream and hast in thy seamy bark 
these verses : 

IK PARIS' BREATH SHALL KAIL NOT, ONCE OENONE HE 

doth sr-URN, 

THE WATERS OE THE XANTHUS TO T1IEIU FOUNT SHALL 
HACKWAltO TURN. 

59 



OVID 



Xanthe, retro propera, versaeque recurrite lymphae 

sustinet Oenoneii deseruisse Paris. 
Ilia dies fatum miserae mihi dixit, ab ilia 

pessima mutati coepit amoris hiemps, 
qua Venus et Iuno sumptisque deeentior armis 

venit in arbitrium inula Minerva tuum. 
attoniti micuere sinus, gelklusque cueurrit, 

ut mihi narrasti, dura per ossa tremor, 
eonsului — neque enim modice terrebar — anusque 

longaevosque senes. constitit esse nefas. 
Caesa abies, sectaeque trabes, et classe parata 

eaerula ceratas accipit unda rates, 
flesti discedens — hoc saltim parce negare ! 1 

miseuimus lacrimas maestus uterque suas ; 
non sic adpositis vincitur vitibus nhiius, 

ut tua sunt collo bracchia nexa meo. 
a, quotiens, cum te ven to quererere teueri, 

riserunt eomites — ille secundus erat ! 
oscula diniissae quotiens repetita dedisti ! 

quam vix sustinuit dicere lingua tc vale " I 
Aura levis rigido pendentia lintea malo 

suscitat, et remis eruta canet aqua, 
prosequor infelix oculis abeuntia vela, 

qua lieet, et laerimis umet harena meis, 
utque eeler venias, virides Nereidas oro — 

scilicet ut venias in mea damna celer ! 

1 vv. 44, 45 omitted as spurious Merk, : 

praeterito magis est iste pudendus amor, 
et flesti et nostros vidisti flentis ocellos. 
"the love thai holds you now is more to your shame than 
one of yore. You both wept and you saiv my weeping eyes." 



THE HRROIDES V 



O Xanthus, backward haste ; turn, waters, and flow 
again to your fount ! Paris lias deserted Oenone, 
and endures it. 

33 That day spoke doom for wretched me, on that 
day did the awful storm of changed love begin, when 
Venus and Juno, and unadorned Minerva, more 
comely had she borne her arms, appeared before 
you to be judged. My bosom leaped with amaze 
as you told me of it, and a chill tremor rushed 
through my hard bones. 1 took counsel — for I was 
no little terrified — with grandams and long-lived 
sires. 'Twas clear to us all that evil threatened 
me. 

41 The firs were felled, the timbers hewn ; your 
fleet was ready, and the deep-blue wave received 
the waxed crafts. Your tears fell as you left me — 
this, at least, deny not ! We mingled our weeping, 
eaeh a prey to grief ; the elm is not so closely 
clasped by the clinging vine as was my neck by your 
embracing arms. Ah, how oft, when you com- 
plained that you were kept by the wind, did your 
comrades smile ! — that wind was favouring. How 
oft, when you had taken your leave of me, did you 
return to ask another kiss ! How your tongue 
eould scarce endure to say " Farewell ! " 

53 A light breeze stirs the sails that hang idly 
from the rigid mast, and the water foams white with 
the churning of the oar. In wretchedness I follow 
with my eyes the departing sails as far as I may, 
and the sand is humid with my tears; that you may 
swiftly come again, I pray the sea-green daughters 
of Nereus — ves, that you may swiftly come to my 
undoing ! Expected to return in answer to my 



OVID 



votis ergo meis alii rediture redisti? 

ei mihij pro dira paelice blanda fui ! 60 
Adspicit inmensum moles nativa profundum — 

mons fuit ; aequoreis ilia resistit aquis. 
liinc ego vela tuae cognovi prima carinae, 

et mihi per fluctus impetus ire fuit. 
dum moror, in summa fulsit mini purpura prora — 65 

pertimui ; cultus non erat ille tuus. 
fit propior tevrasque cita ratis attigit aura ; 

femineas vidi corde tremente genas. 
non satis id fuerat — quid enim furiosa morabar ? — 

haerebat gremio turpis arnica tuo ! 70 
tunc vero rupique sinus et pectora planxi, 

et secui madidas ungue rigente genas, 
inplevique sacram querulis ululatibus Iden 

illuc has lacrimas in mea saxa tuli. 
sic Helene doleat desertaque coniuge ploret, 75 

quaeque prior nobis intulit, ipsa ferat ! 
Nunc tibi conveniunt, quae#te per aperta sequantur 

aequora legitimos destituantque viros ; 
at cum pauper eras armentaque pastor agebas, 

nulla nisi Oenone pauperis uxor erat. 80 
non ego miror opes, nec me tua regia tangit 

nec de tot Priami dicar ut una nurus — 
non tam en ut Priamus nymphae socer esse recuset, 

aut Hecubae fuerim dissimulanda nurus ; 



THE HEROIDES V 

vows, have you returned for the sake of another ? 
Ah me, 'twas for the sake of a cruel rival that my 
persuasive prayers were made ! 

61 A mass of native roek looks down upon the 
unmeasured deep — a mountain it really is; it stays 
the billows of the sea. From here I was the first to 
spy and know the sails of your bark, and my heart's 
impulse was to rush through the waves to you. 
While 1 delayed, on the highest of the prow 1 saw 
the gleam of purple — fear seized upon me ; that was 
not the manner of your garb. The era ft eomes 
nearer, borne on a freshening breeze, and touches 
the shore : with trembling heart I have caught the 
sight of a woman's face. And this was not enough 
— why was I mad enough to stay and see? in your 
embrace that shameless woman clung ! Then 
indeed did 1 rend my bosom and beat my breast, 
and with the hard nail furrowed my streaming 
cheeks, and filled holy Ida with wailing cries of 
lamentation ; yonder to the rocks 1 love 1 bore my 
tears. So may Helen's grief be, and so her lamenta- 
tion, when she is deserted by her love ; and what 
she was first to bring on me may she herself 
endure ! 

77 Your pleasure now is in jades who follow vou 
over the open sea, leaving behind their lawful- 
wedded lords ; but when you were poor and 
shepherded the Hocks, Oenone was your wife, poor 
though you were, and none else. 1 am not dazzled bv 
your wealth, nor am I touched by thought of your 
palace, nor would I be called one of the many wives 
of Priam's sons — yet not that Priam Mould disdain 
a nymph as wife to his son, or that Hecuba 
would have to hide her kinship with me ; 1 am 

63 



OVID 

dignaque sum et cupio fieri matrona potentis ; 85 

sunt mihi, quas possint sceptra decere, manus. 
nec me, faginea quod tecum frond e iacebam, 

despice ; purpureo sum magis apta toro. 
Denique tutus amor meus est ; tibi nulla parantur 

bella, nec ultrices advehit unda rates. 90 
Tyndaris infestis fugitiva reposcitur armis ; 

hac venit in thalamos dote superba tuos. 
quae si sit Danais reddenda, vel Hectora fratrera, 

vel cum Deiphobo Polydamanta roga ; 
quid gravis Antenor, Priamus quid suadeat ipse, 95 

eonsule, quis aetas longa magistra fuit ! 1 
turpe rudimentum, patriae praeponere raptam. 

causa pudenda tua est ; iusta vir arma movet. 
Nec tibi, si sapias, fidam promitte Lacaenam, 

quae sit in amplexus tarn cito versa tuos. 100 
ut minor Atrides temerati foedera lecti 

clamat et externo laesus amore dolet, 
tu quoque clamabis. nulla reparabilis arte 

laesa pudicitia est ; deperit ilia semel. 
ardet amore tui ? sic et Menelaon amavit. 105 

nunc iacet in viduo credulus ille toro. 
felix Andromache, certo bene nupta marito ! 

uxor ad exemplum fratris habenda fui ; 
tu levior foliis, turn cum sine pond ere suci 

mobilibus ventis arida facta volant ; 110 
1 From 97 to VI, 49 are missing in P. 
a Of his career as a prince, after his recognition. 

64 



THE HEROIDES V 



worthy of being, and I desire to be. the matron of a 
puissant lord ; ray hands are such as the sceptre could 
well beseem. Nor despise me because once I pressed 
with you the beeehen frond ; I am better suited for 
the purpled marriage-bed. 

89 Remember, too, my love can bring no harm ; 
it will beget -you no Avars, nor bring avenging 
ships across the wave. The Tyndarid run-away 
is now demanded back by an enemy under arms ; 
this is the dower the dame brings proudly to 
your marriage-chamber. Whether she should be 
rendered back to the Danai, ask Hector your 
brother, if you will, or Deiphobus and Polvdamas ; 
take counsel with grave Antenor, find out what 
Priam's self persuades, whose long lives have made 
them Avise. 'Tis but a base beginning," to prize a 
stolen mistress more than your native land. Your 
ease is one that calls for shame ; just are the arms 
her lord takes up. 

99 Think not, too, if you are wise, that the 
Laeonian will be faithful — she who so quickly 
turned to your embrace. Just as the younger 
Atrides cries out at the violation of his marriage- 
bed, and feels his painful wound from the wife who 
loves another, you too will cry. By no art may 
purity once wounded be made whole ; 'tis lost, 
lost once and for all. Is she ardent with love for 
you? So, too, she loved Menelaus. He, trusting 
fool that he was, lies now in a deserted bed. Happy 
Andromache, well wed to a constant mate ! 1 was 
a wife to whom you should have clung after your 
brother's pattern ; but you — are lighter than leaves 
what time their juice has failed, and dry they flutter 
in the shifting breeze ; you have less weight than 

6 5 



OVID 



et minus est in te qnam sunraia pondus arista, 

quae levis adsiduis solibus usta riget. 
Hoc tua — nam recolo — quondam germana canebat, 

sic mihi diff'usis vaticinata comis : 
" quid facis, Oenone ? quid harenae semina 

mandas ? 115 

non profecturis litora bubus aras. 
Graia iuvenca venit, quae te patriamque domumque 

perdat ! io prohibe ! Graia iuvenca venit ! 
dum licet, obscenam ponto demergite 1 puppim ! 

heu ! quantum Phrygii sanguinis ilia vehit ! " 120 
Dixerat ; in cursu famulae rapuere furentem ; 

at mihi flaventes diriguere comae, 
a, nimiuni miserae vates mihi vera fuisti — 

possidet, en, saltus ilia 2 iuvenca meos ! 
sit facie quamvis insignis, adultera certe est ; 125 

deseruit socios hospite capta deos. 
illam de patria Theseus — nisi nomine fallor — 

nescio quis Theseus abstulit ante sua. 
a iuvene et cupido credatur reddita virgo ? 

unde hoc conpererim tarn bene, quaeris ? amo. 130 
vim licet appelles et culpam nomine veles ; 

quae totiens rapta est, praebuit ipsa rapi. 
at manet Oenone fallenti casta marito — 

et poteras falli legibus ipse tuis ! 
Me Satyri celeres — silvis ego tecta latebam — 135 

quaesierunt rapido, turba proterva, pede" 
cornigerumque caput pinu praecinctus acuta 

Faunus in inmensis, qua tumet Ida, iugis. 

1 dimergite s: di mergite E y Hein. 

2 Graia G Merle. : ilia E a, Plun. 

a Cassandra. 

* Theseus and Pirithous had carried away Helen in her 
early youth. 



66 



THE HEROIDES V 



the tip of the spear of grain, burned light and crisp 
by ever-shining suns. 

113 This, once upon a time — for I call it back to 
mind — your sister a sang to me, with locks let loose, 
foreseeing what should come : " What art thou 
doing, Oenone ? Why commit seeds to sand ? Thou 
art ploughing the shores with oxen that will accomplish 
naught. A Greek heifer is on the way, to ruin thee, 
thy home-land, and thy house ! Ho, keep her far ! 
A Greek heifer is coming ! While yet yc may, sink 
in the deep the unclean ship ! Alas, how much of 
Phrygian blood it hath aboard !" 

121 She ceased to speak ; her slaves seized on her 
as she madly ran. And I — my golden locks stood 
stiffly up. Ah, all too true a prophetess yon were to 
my poor self — she has them, lo, the heifer has my 
pastures ! Let her seem how fair soever of face, none 
the less she surely is a jade ; smitten with a stranger, 
she left behind her marriage-gods. Theseus — unless 
I mistake the name — one Theseus, even before, 
had stolen her away from her father's land. b Is it to 
be thought she was rendered back a maid, by a young 
man and eager? Whence have I learned this 
so well ? you ask. I love. You may call it violence, 
and veil the fault in the word ; yet she who has 
been so often stolen has surely lent herself to 
theft. But Oenone remains chaste, false though her 
husband prove — and, after your own example, she 
might have played you false. 

135 Me, the swift Satyrs, a wanton rout with nimble 
foot, used to come in quest of — where I would lie- 
hidden in covert of the wood — and Faun us., with 
homed head girt round with sharp pine needles, 
where Ida swells in boundless ridges. Me, the 

67 

v -1 



OVID 



me fide conspicuus Troiae munitor amavit, 

admisitque meas ad sua dona manus. 1 146 
quaecumque herba potens ad opem radixque 
medendo 2 

utilis in toto nascitur orbe, mea est. 
me miseram, quod amor non est medicabilis herbis ! 

deficior prudens artis ab arte mea. 150 
Quod nec graminibus tellus fecunda creandis 153 

nec deus, auxilium tu mihi ferre potes. 
et potes, et merui — dignae miserere puellae ! 155 

non ego cum Danais arma cruenta fero — 
sed tua sum tecumque fui puerilibus annis 

et tua, quod superest temporis, esse precor! 



VI 

Hvpsipvle Iasoni 

Litora Thessaliae reduci tetigisse carina 

diceris auratae vellere dives ovis. 
gratulor incolumi, quantum sinis ; hoc tamen ipsum 3 

debueram scripto certior 4 esse tuo. 
nam ne pacta tibi praeter mea regna redires, 5 

cum cuperes, ventos non habuisse potes ; 
quamlibet adverso signetur epistula vento. 

Hypsipyle missa digna salute fui. 

1 vv. 140-145, 151, 152 condemned Merh : 

ille rueae spolium virginitatis habet, 140 
id quoque luctando ; rupi tamen ungue capillos, 

oraque sunt digitis aspera facta meis ; 
nec pretium stupri gemmas aurumque poposci : 

turpiter ingenuum munera corpus emunt ; 
ipse, ratus dignam, medicas mihi tradidit artes 145 
ipse repertor opis vaccas pavisse Pheraeas 151 

fertur et a nostro saucius igne fuit. 



THE HER01DES VI 



builder of Troy, well known for keeping faith, 
loved, and let my hands into the secret of his 
gifts. Whatever herb potent for aid, whatever root 
that is used for healing grows in all the world, is 
mine. Alas, wretched me, that love may not be 
healed by herbs ! Skilled in an art, I am left help- 
less by the very art I know. 

153 The aid that neither earth, fruitful in the bring- 
ing forth of herbs, nor a god himself, can give, you 
have the power to bestow on me. You can bestow 
it, and 1 have merited — have pity on a deserving 
maid ! I come with no Danai, and bear no bloody 
armour — but I am yours, and 1 was your mate in 
childhood's years, and yours through all time to come 
I pray to be ! 

VI 

Hvpsipvle to Jason 

You are said to have touched the shores of 
Thessaly with safe-returning keel, rich in the fleece 
of the golden ram. I speak you well for your safety 
— so far as you give me chance ; yet of this very 
thing I should have been informed by message of 
your own. For the winds might have failed you, 
even though you longed to see me, and kept you 
from returning by way of the realms I pledged 
you;" but a letter may be written, howe'er ad- 
verse the wind. Hypsipyle deserved the sending 
of a greeting. 

a As her marriage portion. 

2 niedendo Ehiw niedendi HfSS. : medenti Hcin, 

3 ipsum Plan, s : ipso (7 w : ipsa Hein. Ehv\ 

4 So the AISS.: debuerat . . . certius Pa. 



6 9 



OVID 



Cur milii fama prior de te quam littera venit : 

isse sacros Martis sub iuga panda boves, 10 
seminibus iactis segetes adolesse virorum 

inque necem dextra non eguisse tua, 
pervigilem spolium pecudis servasse draconem, 

rapta tamen forti vellera fulva manu ? 
haec ego si possem timide credentibus " ista 1 5 

ipse mihi scripsit " dicere, quanta forem ! 
Quid queror officium lenti cessasse mariti ? 

obsequiurm maneo si tua, grande tuli ! 
barbara narratur venisse venefiea tecum, 

in mihi promissi parte recepta tori. 20 
credula res amor est ; utiuam temeraria dicar 

criminibus falsis insimulasse virum ! 
nuper ab Haemoniis hospes mihi Thessalus oris 

venerat, et tactum vix bene limen ei'at, 
" Aesonides/' dixi, "quid agit meus ? " ille pudore 25 

haesit in opposita lumina fixus humo. 
protinus exilui tunicisque a pectore ruptis 

"vivit? an/' exclamo, "me quoque fata vocant ? " 
" vivit/' ait. timidum quod amat 1 ; iurare coegi. 

vix mihi teste deo eredita vita tua est. 30 
Utque animus rediit, tua facta requirere coepi. 

narrat aenipedes Martis arasse boves, 
vipereos dentes in humum pro semine iactos, 

et subito natos arma tulisse viros — 

1 timidum quod amat E s Shuckburgh Hous. : timidumque 
mihi G s : timidus timidum Pa. 



7° 



THE HERO IDES VI 



Why was it rumour brought me tidings of voir, 
rather than lines from your hand ? — tidings that the 
sacred bulls of Mars had received the curving yoke ; 
that at the scattering of the seed there sprang forth 
the harvest of men, who for their doom had no need 
of your right arm ; that the spoil of the ram, the 
deep-gold fleece the unsleeping dragon guarded, 
had nevertheless been stolen away by your bold 
hand. Could I say to those who are slow to credit 
these reports, " He has written me this with his own 
hand/' how proud should I be ! 

17 But why complain that my lord has been 
slow in his duty ? I shall think myself treated 
with all indulgence, so I remain yours. A bar- 
barian poisoner, so the story goes, has come with you, 
admitted to share the marriage-eoueh you promised 
me. Love is epiick to believe ; may it prove that I 
am hasty, and have brought a groundless charge 
against my lord ! Only now from Haemonian 
borders came a Thessalian stranger to my gates. 
Scarce had he well touched the threshold, when I 
cried, "How doth my lord, the sou of Austin ? " 
Speechless he stood in embarrassment, his eyes 
fixed fast upon the ground. I straight leaped up, 
and rent the garment from my breast. " Lives 
he?" I cried, "or must fate call me too?" "Me 
lives," was his reply. Full of fears is love ; I made 
him say it on his oath. Scaree with a god to witness 
could I believe you living. 

31 When calm of mind returned, I began to 
ask of your fortunes. He tells me of the brazen- 
footed oxen of Mars, how they ploughed, of the 
serpent's teeth scattered upon the ground in way of 
seed, of men sprung suddenly forth and bearing 

7' 



OVID 



terrigenas populos civili Marte peremptos 35 

inplesse aetatis fata diurna suae, 
devictus serpens, iterum, si vivat Iason, 

quaerimus ; alternant spesque timorque fidem. 1 
Singula dum narratj studio cursuque loquendi 

detegit ingenio vulncra nostra suo. 40 
lieu ! ubi pacta fides ? ubi eonubialia iura 

fax que sub arsuros dignior ire rogos ? 
non ego sum furto tibi cognita ; pronuba Iuuo 

adfuit et sertis tempora vinctus Hymen, 
at niiln nec Iuno, nec Hymen, sed tristis Erinys 45 

praetulit infaustas sanguinolenta faces. 
Quid mihi cum Minyis, quid cum Dodonide 2 pinu ? 

quid tibi cum patria, navita Tiphy, mea? 
non erat hie aries villo spectabilis aureo, 

nec senis Aeetae regia Lemnos erat. 50 
certa fui primo — sed me mala fata trahebant — 

hospita feminea pell ere castra manu ; 
Lemniadesque viros, nimium quoque, vincere norunt. 

milite tarn forti causa 3 tuenda fuit ! 
Urbe virum vidi, tectoque animoque recepi ! 55 

hie tibi bisque aestas bisque cucurrit hiemps. 
tertia messis erat, cum tu dare vela coactus 

inplesti lacrimis talia verba tuis : 
" abstrahor, Hypsipyle ; sed dent modo fata recursus, 

vir tuns hinc abeo, vir tibi semper ero. 60 

1 rv. 31-38 spurious Merle. Pa.: 31-36 defended Hows. 

2 Dodonide Plan.: Tritonide MSS. 

3 causa Merk. Pa. : vita P 2 G E us Plan. : fortuna P Y 



a The Argo, with whose building Dodona in Thessalj' had 
to do. 

6 The women of Lemnos had once slain all the men in the 
island as a measure of revenge against their husbands, who 
had taken Thracian women in their stead. 

72 



THE HEK01DES VI 



arms — earth-born peoples slain in combat with their 
fellows, filling out the fates of their lives in the space 
of a clay. He tells of the dragon overcome. Again 
I ask if Jason lives; hope and fear bring trust and 
mistrust by turns. 

30 While part by part he tells the tale, such, in 
the rushing eagerness of his speech, is his uncon- 
scious art that he lays bare my wounds. Alas ! 
where is the faith that was promised me ? Where 
the bonds of wedlock, and the marriage torch, more 
fit to set ablaze my funeral pile? I was not made 
acquaint with you in stealthy wise ; Juno was there 
to join us when we were wed, and Hymen, his 
temples bound with wreaths. And vet neither Juno 
nor Hymen, but gloomy Erinys, stained with blood, 
carried before me the unhallowed torch. 

47 What had I with the Minyae, or Dodona's 
pine?" What had you with my native land, O 
helmsman Tiphys ? There was here no ram, sightly 
with golden fleece, nor was Lemnos the royal home 
of old Aeetes. I was resolved at first — but my ill 
fate drew me on — to drive out with my women's 
band the stranger troop ; the women of Lemnos 
know — yea, even too well — how to vanquish men.'' 
1 should have let a soldiery so brave defend my 
cause. 

53 But I looked on the man in my city ; 1 welcomed 
him under my roof and into my heart! Here twiee 
the summer fled for you, here twice the winter. It 
was the third harvest when you were compelled 
to set sail, and with your tears poured forth such 
words as these : " I am sundered from thee, Hyp- 
sipyle; but so the fates grant me return, thine own 
I leave thee now, and thine own will I ever be. 

73 



OVID 



quod tamen e nobis gravida celatur in alvo, 

vivat 3 et eiusdcm simus uterque parens ! " 
Hactenus, et lacrimis in falsa eadentibus ora 

cetera te memini non potuisse loqui. 
Ultimus e sociis sacram conscendis in Argon. 65 

ilia volat ; ventus concava vela tenet ; 
caerula propulsae subducitur unda carinae ; 

terra tibi, nobis adspiciuntur aquae, 
in latus omne patens turns circumspicit undas ; 

hue feror, et lacrimis osque sinusque madent. 70 
per lacrimas specto 3 cupidaeque faventia menti 

longius adsueto lumina nostra vident. 
adde preces castas inmixtaque vota timori — 

nunc quoque te salvo persoluenda mihi. 
Vota ego persolvani ? votis Medea fruetur ! 75 

cor dolet, atque ira mixtus abundat amor, 
dona feram templis, vivum quod Iasona perdo ? 

hostia pro damnis concidat icta meis ? 
Non equidem secura fui semperque verebar, 

ne pater Argolica sumeret urbe nuruni. 80 
Argolidas tiinui — nocuit mihi barbara paelex ! 

non expectata vulnus ab hoste tuli. 
nec facie meritisque placet., sed carmina novit 

diraque cantata pabula falce metit. 
ilia reluctantem cursu 1 deducere lunam 85 

nititur et tenebris abdere solis equos ; 

1 cursu P Eai : curru s Hein. 
" Built at the instigation of Athena. 

74 



the heuoidp:s VI 



What lietli heavy in thy bosom from me — may it 
come to live, and may we both share in its parentage ! " 

63 Thus did you speak ; and with tears streaming 
down your false face 1 remember you eould say no 
more. 

65 You are the last of your band to board the 
sacred Argo. a It flies upon its way; the wind bellies 
out the sail ; the dark-blue wave glides from under the 
keel as it drives along ; your gaze is on the land, and 
mine is on the sea. There is a tower that looks 
from every side upon the waters round about ; thither 
I betake myself, my face and bosom wet with tears. 
Through my tears I gaze ; my eyes are gracious to 
my eager heart, and see farther than their wont. 
Add thereto pure-hearted prayers, and vows mingled 
with fears — vows which I must now fulfil, since 
you are safe. 

75 And am I to absolve these vows — vows but for 
Medea to enjoy? My heart is sick, and surges with 
mingled wrath and love. Am I to bear gifts to 
the shrines because Jason lives, though mine no 
more ? Is a victim to fall beneath the stroke for the 
loss that has come to me ? 

79 No, I never felt secure ; but my fear was ever 
that your sire would look to an Argolic city for a 
bride to his son. 'Twas the daughters of Argolis 1 
feared — yet my ruin has been a barbarian jade ! The 
wound I feel is not from the foe whence I thought 
to see it eome. Her charm for you is neither in her 
beauty nor her merit ; but you are made hers by 
the incantations she knows, by the enchanted blade 
with which she garners the baneful herb. She strives 
with the reluctant moon, to bring it down from its 
course in the skies, and makes hide away in shadows 



75 



OVID 



ilia refrenat aquas obliquaque flumina sistit ; 

ilia loco silvas viva que saxa movet. 
per tumulos errat passis discincta capillis 

certaque de tepidis colligit ossa rogis. 90 
devovet absentis simulacraque cerea figit, 

et miserum tenuis in iecur urget acus — 
et quae nescierim melius, male quaeritur herbis 

moribus et forma conciliandus amor. 
Hanc potes amplecti thalamoque relictus in uno 95 

inpavidus somno nocte silente frui ? 
scilicet ut tauros, ita te iuga ferre coegit 

quaque feros anguis, te quoque mulcet ope. 
adde, quod adscribi factis procerumque tuisque 

se facit, 1 et titulo coniugis uxor obest. 100 
atque aliquis Peliae de partibus acta venenis 

inputat et populum, qui sibi credat, habet : 
" non haec Aesonides, sed Phasias Aeetine 

aurea Phrixeae terga revellit ovis." 
non probat Alcimede mater tua — consule 

matrem — 105 

non pater, a gelido cui venit axe nurus. 
ilia sibi a Tanai Scythiaeque paludibus udae 

quaerat et a patria Phasidis usque virum ! 
Mobilis Aesonide vernaque incertior aura, 

cur tua polliciti pondere verba carent ? 110 
vir mens hinc ieras, vir non meus hide redisti. 

shn reducis coniuux, sicut euntis eram ! 



1 facit P 1 Es, Ehw.; fayet P : fa vet O Merk. 

7 6 



THE HERO IDES VI 



the steeds of the sun ; she reins the waters in, and 
stays the down-winding stream ; she charms life into 
trees and rocks, and moves them from their place. 
Among sepulchres she stalks, ungirded, with hair 
Mowing loose, and gathers from the yet warm funeral 
pyre the appointed bones. She vows to their doom 
the absent, fashions the waxen image, and into its 
wretched heart drives the slender needle — and other 
deeds 'twere better not to know. Ill sought by 
herbs is love that should be won by virtue and 
by beauty. 

95 A woman like this can you embrace ? Can you 
be left in the same chamber with her and not feel 
fear, and enjoy the slumber of the silent night? 
Surely, she must have forced you to bear the yoke, 
just as she forced the bulls, and has you subdued 
by the same means she uses with fierce dragons. 
Add that she has her name writ in the record of 
your own and your heroes' exploits, and the wife 
obscures the glory of the husband. And someone 
of the partisans of Pelias imputes your deeds to her 
poisons, and wins the people to believe : "This fleece 
of gold from the ram of Phrixus the son of Aeson did 
not seize away, but the Phasian girl, Aeetes' child." 
Your mother Alcimede — ask counsel of your mother 
— favours her not, nor your sire, who sees his son's 
bride come from the frozen north. Let her seek for 
herself a husband — from the Tanais, from the m;irshes 
of watery Scythia, even from her own land of Phasis ! 

109 O changeable son of Aeson, more uncertain 
than the breezes of springtime, why lack your words 
the weight a promise claims ? Aly own you went 
forth hence ; my own you have not returned. Let 
me be your wedded mate now you are come back, 

77 



OVID 



si te nobilitas generosaque nomina tangunt — 

en, ego Minoo nata Thoante feror ! 
Bacchus avus; Bacchi coniunx redimita corona 115 

praeradiat stellis signa minora suis. 
dos tibi Lemnos erit, terra ingeniosa colenti ; 

me quoque dotalis 1 inter habere potes. 
Nunc etiam peperi ; gratare ambobus, Iason ! 

dulce mihi gravidae fecerat auctor onus. 120 
fehx in numero quoque sum prolemque gemellam, 

pignora Lucina bina favente dedi. 
si quaeris, cui sint similes, cognosceris illis. 

fallere non norunt ; cetera patris habent. 
legates quos paene dedi pro matre ferendos ; 125 

sed tenuit coeptas saeva noverca vias. 
Medeam timui : plus est Medea noverca ; 

Medeae faciunt ad scelus omne manus. 
Spai-gere quae fratris potuit lacerata per agros 

corpora, pignoribus parceret ilia meis ? 1 30 

banc, banc, 2 o demens Colchisque ablate venenis, 

diceris Hypsipyles praeposuisse toro ! 
turpi ter ilia virum cognovit adultera virgo ; 

me tibi teque mihi taeda pudica dedit. 
prodidit ilia patrem ; rapui de clade Thoanta. 135 

deseruit Colchos ; me mea Lemnos habet. 

1 dotales Salmashis : quoque I//////, with 1 and s visible P : 
quod tales G s : res tales many MSS. 

2 hanc hanc Pa.: hanc P : hanc tamen O &>. 

a Nebropbonus and Euneus, according to Apollodorus ; 
according to Hyginus, Euneus and Deiphilus. 

* So Medea had done with Absyrtus, to delay her father's 
pursuit of Jason and herself. 

c She had saved her father from the general massacre of 
the men of Lemnos. 



78 



THE HEROIDES VI 



as I was when you set forth ! If noble blood and 
generous lineage move you — lo, I am known as 
daughter of Minoan Thoas ! Bacchus was my grand- 
sire ; the bride of Bacchus, with erown-cucirclcd 
brow, outshines with her stars the lesser constella- 
tions. Lemnos will be my marriage portion, land 
kindly-natured to the husbandman ; and me, too, 
you will possess among the subjeets my dowry 
brings. 

110 And now, too, I have brought forth ; rejoice for 
us both, Jason ! Sweet was the burden that I bore — 
its author had made it so. I am happy in the number, 
too, for by Lucina's kindly favour ! have brought 
forth twin offspring, a pledge for each of us." If you 
ask whom they resemble, I answer, yourself is seen 
in them. The ways of deceit they know not ; for 
the rest, they are like their father. 1 almost gave 
them to be earried to you, their mother's ambassa- 
dors ; but thought of the cruel stepdame turned me 
baek from the path I would have trod. 'Twas Medea 
1 feared. Medea is more than a stepdame ; the 
hands of Medea are fitted for any crime. 

129 Would she who could tear her brother limb from 
limb and strew him o'er the fields be one to spare 
my pledges? 6 Such is she, such the woman, () 
madman swept from your senses by the poisons of 
Colehis, for whom you are said to have slighted the 
marriage-bed with Hypsipyle ! Base and shameless 
was the way that maid became your bride ; but the 
bond that gave me to you, and you to me, was 
chaste. She betrayed her sire; 1 rescued from death 
my father Thoas. c She deserted the Colchians ; my 
Lemnos has me still. What matters aught, if sin is 



79 



OVID 

Quid refert, scelerata pi am si vincet et ipso 

crimine dotata est emeruitque virum ? 
Lemniadum facinus culpo, non miror, Iason ; 

quamlibet infirmis ipse 1 dat arma dolor. 140 
die age, si ventis, ut oportuit, actus iniquis 

intrasses portus tuque comesque meos, 
obviaque exissem fetu eomitante gemello — 

lriscere nempe tibi terra roganda fuit ! — 
quo vultu natos, quo me, seelerate, videres ? 145 

perfidiae pretio qua nece dignus eras ? 
ipse quidem per me tutus sospesque fuisses — 

non quia tu dignus, sed quia mitis ego. 
paelicis ipsa meos inplessem sanguine vultus, 

quosque vencficiis abstulit ilia suis ! 150 
Medeae Medea forem ! quodsi quid ab alto 

iustus adest votis Iuppiter ipse 2 meis, 
quod gemit Hypsipyle, lecti quoque subnuba nostri 

maereat et leges sentiat ipsa suas ; 
utque ego destituor coniunx materque duorum, 15,5 

a totidem natis orba sit ilia viro ! 
nec male parta diu teneat peiusque relinquat — 

exulet et toto quaerat in orbe fugam ! 
quam fratri germana fuit miseroque parenti 

filia, tarn natis, tarn sit acerba viro ! 160 

1 ipse P 2 : iste Mad v. 

- ipse tht MSS. : ilia Hein. Bent. Pa. 

So 



THE HERO IDES VI 



to be set before devotion, and she lias won her 
husband with the very crime she brought him as her 
dower ? 

139 The vengeful deed of the Lemuian women I 
condemn, Jason, I do not marvel at it ; passion 
itself drives the weak, however powerless, to take 
up arms. Come, say, what if, driven by unfriendly 
gales, you had entered my harbours, as 'twere fitting 
you had done, you and your companion, and I had 
come forth to meet you with my twin babes — surely 
you must have prayed earth to yawn for you — 
with what countenance could you have gazed upon 
your children, O wretched man, with what counten- 
ance upon me? What death would you not deserve 
as the price of your perfidy? And yet you yourself 
would have met with safety and protection at my 
hands — not that you deserved, but that I was 
merciful. But as for your mistress— with my own 
hand I would have dashed my face with her blood, 
and your face, that she stole away with her poisonous 
arts ! I would have been Medea to Medea ! 

151 But if in any way just Jupiter himself from on 
high attends to my prayers, may the woman who 
intrudes upon my marriage-bed suffer the woes in 
which Hypsipyle groans, and feel the lot she her- 
self now brings on me ; and as 1 am now left alone, 
wife and mother of two babes, so may she one day 
be reft of as many babes, and of her husband ! Nor 
may she long keep her ill-gotten gains, but leave 
them in worse hap — let her be an exile, and seek a 
refuge through the entire world ! A bitter sister to 
her brother, a bitter daughter to her wretched sire, 
may she be as bitter to her children, and as bitter to 
her husband ! When she shall have no hope more of 

Si 



OVID 



cum mare, cum terras consumpserit, aera temptet ; 

erret inops, exspes, caede cruenta sua ! 
haec ego, coniugio fraudata Thoantias oro. 

vivite, devoto nuptaque virque toro ! 

VII 
Dido Aeneae 

Sic ubi fata voeant, udis abiectus in herbis 

ad vada Maeandri concinit albus olor. 
Nec quia te nostra sperem prece posse moveri, 

adloquor — adverso rnovimus ista deo ; 
sed merita et famam corpusque animumque 

pudicum 5 

cum male perdiderim, perdere verba leve est. 
Certus es ire tamen miseramque relinquere Didon, 

atque idem venti vela fidemque ferent ? 
certus es, Aenea, cum foedere solvere naves, 

quaeque ubi sint nescis, Itala regna sequi ? 10 
nec nova Carthago, nec te crescentia tangunt 

moenia nec sceptro tradita summa tuo ? 
facta fugis, facienda petis ; quaerenda per orbem 

altera, quaesita est altera terra tibi. 

a The song preceding death. 

6 Ovid has the fourth book of the Aeneid in mind as he 
composes this letter. 

82 



THE HER01DES VII 



refuge by the sea or by the land, let her make trial 
of the air ; let her wander, destitute, bereft of hope, 
stained red with the blood of her murders ! This 
fate do I, the daughter of Thoas, cheated of my 
wedded state, in prayer call down upon you. Live 
on, a wife and husband, accursed in your bed ! 



VII 

Dido to Aeneas 

Thus, at the summons of fate, casting himself down 
amid the watery grasses by the shallows of Maeander, 
sings the white swan." 

3 Not because I hope you may be moved by 
prayer of mine do I address you — for with God's 
will adverse I have begun the words you read ; but 
because, after wretched losing of desert, of reputa- 
tion, and of purity of body and soul, the losing of 
words is a matter slight indeed. 

7 Are you resolved none the less to go, and to 
abandon wretched Dido, 6 and shall the same winds 
bear away from me at once your sails and your 
promises ? Are you resolved, Aeneas, to break at 
the same time from your moorings and from your 
pledge, and to follow after the fleeting realms of 
Italy, which lie you know not where? and does new- 
founded Carthage not touch you, nor her rising walls, 
nor the sceptre of supreme power placed in your 
hand ? What is achieved, you turn your back 
upon ; what is to be achieved, you ever pursue. 
One land has been sought and gained, and ever 
must another be sought, through the wide world. 

S3 

o •-' 



OVID 



ut terrain inveuias, quis earn tibi tradet lial>en- 

dam ? 15 

quis sua non notis arva tenenda dabit ? 
alter habendus amor tibi restat et altera Dido ; 1 

quamque iterum fallas altera danda fides, 
quando erit, ut condas instar Carthaginis urbem 

et videas populos altus ab arce tuos ? 20 
omnia ut eveniant, nec te tua vota morentur, 

unde tibi, quae te sic amet, uxor erit ? 
Uror, ut inducto ceratae sulpure taedae, 

lit pia fumosis addita tura focis. 2 
Aeneas oculis semper vigilantis inhaeret ; 25 

Aencan animo noxque diesque refert. 
ille quidem male gratus et ad mea muuera surdus, 

et quo, si non sim stulta, carere velim ; 
non tamen Aenean, quamvis male cogitat, odi, 

sed queror infidum questaque peius amo. 30 
parce, Venus, nurui, durumque ampleetere fratrem, 

frater Amor, castris militet ille tuis ! 
aut ego, quem 3 coepi — neque enim dedignor — amare, 

materiam curae praebeat ille meae ! 
Fallor, et ista milii falso iactatur imago ; 35 

matris ab ingenio dissidet ille suae, 
te lapis et montes innataque rupibus altis 

robora, te saevae progennere ferae, 

1 So s Burm.: alter amor tibi est habendus et P : a. a. t. et 
exstat habendus G E s : a. a. tibi restat? habendast altera 
Dido ? Birt Ehw. 

2 vv. 24, 25 defended by Hons., condemned by Pa. EJnv. 

3 quern co early editions : quae P G E s Plan. 

S 4 



THE HEROIDES VII 



Yet, even should you find the land of your desire, 
who will give it over to you for your own ? Who 
will deliver his fields to unknown hands to keep? 
A second love remains for you to win, and a second 
Dido ; a seeond pledge to give, and a second time 
to prove false. When will it be your fortune, think 
you, to found a city like to Cartilage, and from the 
citadel on high to look down upon peoples of your 
own ? Should your every wish be granted, even 
should you meet with no delay in the answering of 
vour pravers, whence will come the wife to love vou 
as I ? 

23 I am all ablaze with love, like torches of wax 
tipped with sulphur, like pious incense placed on 
smoking altar-fires. Aeneas my eyes cling to 
through all my waking hours ; Aeneas is in my heart 
through the night and through the day. 'Tis true 
he is an ingrate, and unresponsive to my kindnesses, 
and were I not fond I should be willing to have him 
go ; yet, however ill his thought of me, I hate him 
not, but only complain of his faithlessness, and when 
I have complained I do but love more madly still. 
Spare, O Venus, the bride of thy son ; lay hold 
of thy hard-hearted brother, O brother Love, and 
make him to serve in thv eamp ! Or make him to 
whom I have let my love go forth — 1 first, and with 
never shame for it — yield me himself, the object of 
my care ! 

35 Ah, vain delusion ! the fancy that flits before my 
mind is not the truth ; far different his heart from 
his mother's. Of rocks and mountains were you be- 
gotten, and of the oak sprung from the lofty cliff", of 
savagewild beasts, or of the sea — such a sea asevcn now 

85 



OVID 



aut mare, quale vides agitari nunc quoque ventis, 

quo tamen adversis fluctibus ire paras. 40 
quo fugis ? obstat biemps. hiemis mibi gratia prosit i 

adspice, ut eversas concitet Eurus aquas ! 
quod tibi malueram, sine me debere procellis ; 

iustior est animo ventus et unda tuo. 
Non ego sum tanti — quid non censeris inique ? — 45 

ut pereas, dum me per freta longa fugis. 
exerces pretiosa odia et constantia magrjo, 

si, dum me careas, est tibi vile mori. 
iam vcnti ponent, strataque aequaliter unda 

caeruleis Triton per mare curret equis. 50 
tu quoque cum ventis utinam mutabilis esses ! 

et, nisi duritia robora vincis, eris. 
quid, si nescires, insana quid aequora possunt ? 

expertac totiens quam 1 male credis aquae ! 
ut, pelago suadente etiam, retinacula solvas, 55 

multa tamen latus tristia pontus habet. 
nec violasse fidem temptantibus aequora prodest ; ' 

perfidiae poenas exigit ille locus, 
praecipue cum laesus amor, quia mater Amorum 

nuda Cytberiacis edita fertur aquis. 60 
Perdita ne perdam, timeo, noceamve nocenti, 

neu bibat aequoreas naufragus hostis aquas, 
vive, precor ! sic te melius quam funere perdam. 

tu potius leti causa ferere mei. 

1 quam s Merk. 

86 



THE HE HO IDES VII 



you look upon, tossed by the winds, on which you arc 
none the less making ready to sail, despite the threaten- 
ing floods. Whither are you flying ? The tempest 
rises to stay you. Let the tempest be m y grace ! Look 
you, how Eurus tosses the rolling waters ! What I had 
preferred to owe to you, let me owe to the stormy 
blasts ; wind and wave are juster than your heart. 

45 I am not worth enough — ah, why do I not 
wrongly rate you ? — to have you perish flying from 
me over the long seas. 'Tis a costly and a dear- 
bought hate that you indulge if, to be quit of me, 
you account it cheap to die. Soon the winds will 
fall, and o'er the smooth-spread waves will Triton 
course with cerulean steeds. O that you too were 
changeable with the winds ! — and, unless in hard- 
ness you exceed the oak, you will be so. What 
could you worse, if yon did not know of the power 
of raging seas? How ill to trust the wave whose 
might you have so often felt ! Even should you 
loose your cables at the persuasion of calm seas, 
there are none the less many woes to be met on 
the vasty deep. Nor is it well for those who have 
broken faith to tempt the billows. Yon is the place 
that exacts the penalty for faithlessness, above all 
when 'tis love has been wronged ; for 'twas from 
the sea, in Cytherean waters, so runs the talc, that 
the mother of the Loves, undraped, arose. 

61 Undone myself, I fear lest I be the undoing 
of him who is my undoing, lest 1 bring harm to 
him who brings harm to me, lest my enemy be 
wrecked at sea and drink the waters of the dec]). 
O live ; I pray it ! Thus shall I see you worse 
undone than by death. You shall rather be reputed 
the cause of my own doom. Imagine, pray, imagine 

87 



OVID 



finge, age, te rapid o — nullum sit in omine 

pondus ! — 65 

turbine deprendi ; quid tibi mentis erit ? 
protinus occurrent falsae periuria linguae, 

et Phrygia Dido fraude coacta mori ; 
coniugis ante oculos deceptae stabit imago 

tristis et effusis sanguinolenta comis. 70 
quid tanti est ut turn " merui ! concedite ! " dicas, 

quaeque cadent, in te fulmina missa putes ? 
Da breve saevitiae spatium pelagique tuaeque ; 

grande morae pretium tuta futura via est. 
nee mihi tu curae ; puero parcatur Iulo ! 75 

te satis est titulum mortis habere meae. 
quid puer Ascanius, quid di meruere 1 Penates ? 

ignibus ereptos obruet unda deos ? 
sed neque fers tecum, nee, quae mihi, perfide, iactas, 

presserunt umeros sacra paterque tuos. 80 
omnia mentiris, neque enim tua fallere lingua 

incipit a nobis, primaque plector ego. 
si quaeras, ubi sit formosi mater Iuli — 

occidit a duro sola relicta viro ! 
haec mihi narraras — sat me monuere ! 2 merentem 85 

ure ; minor culpa poena futura mea est. 
Nec mihi mens dubia est, quin te tua numina 
damnent. 

per mare, per terras septima iactat hiemps. 

1 So G w vulg.: quid meruere P : quid commeruere Pa. 

2 at me novere Eo>: at me movere Merk. Pa.: di me 
monuere Madv.: sat me monuere Hous. 

" Another name for Ascanius, the son of Aeneas. 

8S 



THE HEROIDES VII 



that you are caught — may there be nothing in t he 
omen! — in the sweeping of the storm; what will he 
your thoughts ? Straight will come rushing to your 
mind the perjury of your false tongue, and Dido 
driven to death by Phrygian faithlessness ; before 
your eyes will appear the features of your deceived 
wife, heavy with sorrow, with hair streaming, and 
stained with blood. What now can you gain to 
recompense you then, when you will have to say : 
" "Tis my desert ; forgive me, ye gods!" when you 
will have to think that whatever thunderbolts fall 
were hurled at you ? 

73 Grant a short spaee for the cruelty of the sea, 
and for your own, to subside ; your safe voyage 
will be great reward for waiting. Nor is it 
vou for whom I am anxious ; only let the little 
lulus a be spared! For vou, enough to have the 
credit for my death. What has little Ascanius 
done, or what your Penates, to deserve ill fate? 
Have they been rescued from fire but to be over- 
whelmed by the wave? Yet neither are you bearing 
them with you ; the sacred relics which are your 
pretext never rested on your shoulders, nor did 
your father. You are false in everything — and I 
am not the first your tongue has deceived, nor am 
I the first to feel the blow from you. Do you ask 
where the mother of pretty lulus is? — she perished, 
left behind by her unfeeling lord! This was the 
story you told me— yes. and it was warning enough 
for me! Burn me; I deserve it! The punishment 
will be less than befits my fault. 

87 And my mind doubts not that you, too, are 
under condemnation of your gods. Over sea and 
over land you are now for the seventh winter being 

S9 



OVID 



fluctibus eiectum tuta statione recepi 

vixque bene audito nomine regna dedi. 90 
his tamen officiis utinam contenta fuissem, 

et mihi concubitus fama sepulta foret ! 
ilia dies nocuit, qua nos declive sub antrum 

caeruleus subitis conpulit imber aquis. 
audieram vocem ; nymphas ululasse putavi — 95 

Eumenides fatis signa dedere meis! 
Exige, laese pudor, poenas ! violate Sychaei 1 . . . . 

ad quaS; me miseram, plena pudoris eo. 
est mihi marmorea sacratus in aede Sychaeus — 

oppositae frondes velleraque alba tegunt. 100 
hinc ego me sensi noto quater ore citari ; 

ipse sono tenui dixit " Elissa, veni! " 
Nulla mora est, veniOj venio tibi debita coniunx ; 

sum tamen admissi tarda pudore mei. 
da veniam culpae ! decepit idoneus auctor ; 105 

invidiam noxae detrahit ille meae. 
diva parens seniorque pater, pia sarcina natij 

spem mihi mansuri rite dedere viri. 2 
si fuit errandunr, causas habet error honestas ; 

adde fidem, nulla parte pigendus erit. 110 
Durat in extremum vitaeque novissima nostrae 

prosequitur fati, qui fuit ante, tenor, 
occidit internas coniunx mactatus ad aras, 

et sceleris tanti praemia frater habet ; 

1 Lacuna. 2 tori G Merle. 

a Dido's husband in Tyre. 

9° 



THE HEROIDES VII 



tossed. You were cast ashore by the waves and 
I received you to a safe abiding-place ; scarce 
knowing your name, I gave to you my throne. Yet 
would I had been content with these kindnesses, 
and that the story of our union were buried ! That 
dreadful day was my ruin, when sudden downpour 
of rain from the deep-blue heaven drove us to 
shelter in the lofty grot. I had heard .a voice ; I 
thought it a ery of the nymphs — 'twas the Eu- 
menides sounding the signal for my doom ! 

97 Exact the penalty of me, O purity undone ! — 
the penalty due Syehaeus." To absolve it now I 
go — ah me, wretched that I am, and overcome with 
shame ! Standing in shrine of marble is an image 
of Sychaeus I hold sacred — in the midst of green 
fronds hung about, and fillets of white wool. From 
within it four times have I heard myself called by a 
voice well known; 'twas he himself crying in faintly 
sounding tone : "Elissa, come ! " 

103 i ( ] e lay no longer, I come ; I come thy bride, 
thine own by right; I am late, but 'tis for shame of 
my fault confessed. Forgive me my offence ! He 
was worthy who caused my fall ; he draws from my 
sin its hatefulness. That his mother was divine and 
his aged father the burden of a loyal son gave 
hope he would remain my faithful husband. If 'twas 
my fate to err, my error had honourable cause ; so 
only he keep faith, I shall have no reason for regret. 

111 The lot that was mine in days past still follows 
me in these last moments of life, and will pursue 
to the end. My husband fell in his blood before the 
altars in his very house, and my brother possesses the 
fruits of the monstrous crime ; myself am driven 



OVID 



exul agor cineresque viri patriamque relinquo, 115 

et feror in duras hoste sequente vias. 
adplicor ignotis fratrique elapsa fretoque 

quod tibi donavi, perfide, litus emo. 
urbem constitui lateque patentia fixi 

moenia finitimis invidiosa locis. 120 
bella tument ; bellis peregrina et fernina temptor, 

vixque rudis portas urbis et arma paro. 
mille procis placui, qui me coiere querentes 

nescio quern thalamis praeposuisse suis. 
quid dubitas vinctam Gaetulo tradere Iarbae ? 125 

praebuerim sceleri bracehia nostra tuo. 
est etiam frater, cuius manus inpia possit 

respergi nostro, sparsa cruore viri, 
pone deos et quae tangendo sacra profanas ! 

non bene caelestis inpia dextra colit. 130 
si tu cultor eras elapsis igne futurus^ 

paenitet elapsos ignibus esse deos. 
Forsitan et gravidam Didon. scelerate, relinquas, 

parsque tui lateat corpore clausa meo. 
accedet fatis matris miserabilis infans. 135 

et nondum nato 1 funeris auctor eris., 
cumque parente sua frater morietur Inli, 

poenaque conexos auferet una duos. 
Sed iubet ire deus." veil em, vetuisset adire, 

Punica nec Teucris pressa fuisset humus ! 140 
1 nato ITein.: nati Pa. 

92 



THE HEROIDES VII 



into exile, compelled to leave behind the ashes 
of my lord and the land of my birth. Over hard 
paths I fly, and my enemy pursues. I bind on shores 
unknown ; escaped from my brother and the sea, I 
purchase the strand that I gave, perfidious man, to 
you. I establish a city, and lay about it the found- 
ations of wide-reaching walls that stir the jealousy 
of neighbouring realms. Wars threaten : by wars, 
a stranger and a woman, I am assailed ; hardly can 
I rear rude gates to the city and make ready my 
defence. A thousand suitors cast fond eves on me. 
and have joined in the complaint that I preferred 
the hand of some stranger love. Why do you not 
bind me forthwith, and give me over to Gaetulian 
larbas ? I should submit my arms to your shameful 
act. There is my brother, too, whose impious hand 
could be sprinkled with my blood, as it is already 
sprinkled with my lord's. Lay down those gods and 
sacred things ; your touch profanes them ! It is 
not well for an impious right hand to worship 
the dwellers in the sky. If 'twas fated for you to 
worship the gods that escaped the fires, the gods 
regret that they escaped the fires. 

133 Perhaps, too, it is Dido soon to be mother. 
O evil-doer, whom yon abandon now, and a part 
of your being lies hidden in myself. To the fate 
of the mother will be added that of the wretched 
babe, and you will be the cause of doom to your yet 
unborn child; with his own mother will lulus' 
brother die, and one fate will bear us both away 
together. 

139 " But you are bid to go — by your god ! " Ah. 
would he had forbidden you to come : would 
Punic soil had never been pressed by Teuerian 



93 



OVID 



hoc duce nempe deo ventis agitaris iniquis 

et teris in rapido tempora longa freto ? 
Pergama vix tanto tibi erant repetenda labore, 

Hectore si vivo quanta fuere forent. 
non patrium Simoenta petis, sed Thybridas 

undas — 145 

nempe ut pervenias, quo cupis, hospes eris ; 
utque latet vitatque tuas abstrusa carinas, 

vix tibi continget terra petita seni. 
Hos potius populos in dotem, ambage remissa, 

accipe et advectas Pygmalionis opes. 150 
Ilion in Tyriam transfer felicius urbem 

resque loco 1 regis sceptraque sacra tene ! 
si tibi mens avida est belli, si quaerit lulus, 

unde suo partus Marte triumphus eat, 
quern superet, nequid desit, praebebimus hos- 

tem ; 155 

hie pacis leges, hie locus arma capit. 
tu modo, per matrem fraternaque tela, sagittas, 

perque fugae comites, Dardana sacra, deos — 
sic superent, quoscumque tua de gente reportas, 

Mars ferus et damni sit modus ille tui, 1 60 

Ascaniusque suos feliciter inpleat annos, 

et senis Anchisae molliter ossa cubent ! — 
parce, precor, domui, quae se tibi tradit habendam ! 

quod crimen dicis praeter amasse meum ? 
non ego sum Phthias magnisque oriunda Mycenis, 165 

nec steteruut in te virque paterque meus. 

1 So Pa.: inque loco P 2 over an erasure OEs: iamque 
locum Ehw. : etc. 

" The home of Achilles. 

94 



THE HEROIDES VII 



feet ! Is this, forthsooth, the god under whose 
guidance you are tossed about by unfriendly winds, 
and pass long years on the surging seas? 'Twould 
searce require such toil to return again to Perga- 
mum, were Pergamum still what it was while Hector 
lived. 'Tis not the Simois of your fathers you seek, 
but the waves of Tiber — and yet, forsooth, should 
vou arrive at the place you wish, you will be but 
a stranger; and the land of your quest so hides 
from your sight, so draws away from contact with 
your keels, that 'twill searce be your lot to reach 
it in old age. 

140 Cease, then, your wanderings ! Choose rather 
me, and with me my dowry — these peoples of mine, 
and the wealth of Pygmalion 1 brought with me. 
Transfer your I lion to the Tyrian town, and give 
it thus a happier lot ; enjoy the kingly state, and 
the sceptre's right divine. If your soul is eager 
for war, if lulus must have field for martial 
prowess and the triumph, we shall find him foes 
to conquer, and naught shall lack ; here there is 
place for the laws of })eaee, here place, too, for 
arms. Do you only, by your mother I pray, and by 
the weapons of your brother, his arrows, and by 
the divine companions of your flight, the gods of 
Dardanus — so may those rise above fate whom you 
are saving from out your race, so may that cruel war 
be the last of misfortunes to you, and so may 
Ascanius fill happily out his years, and the bones of 
old Anchises rest in peace ! — do you only spare the 
house whieh gives itself without condition into your 
hand. What can you charge me with but love ? 
I am not of Phthia," nor sprung of great Mycenae, 
nor have I had a husband and a father who have 



95 



OVID 



si pudet uxoris, non nupta, sed hospita dicar ; 

dum tua sit, Dido quidlibet esse feret. 
Nota mihi freta sunt Afrum plangentia litus ; 

temporibus certis dantque negantque viam. 170 
cum dabit aura viam, praebebis carbasa ventis ; 

nunc levis eiectam continet alga ratem. 
tempus ut observem, manda mihi ; serius ibis, 

nec te, si cupies, ipsa manere sinam. 
et socii requiem poscunt, laniataque classis 175 

postulat exiguas semirefecta moras ; 
pro meritis et siqua tibi debebimus ultra, 1 

pro spe coniugii tempora parva peto— 
dum freta mitescunt et amor, dum tempore et usu 

fortiter edisco tristia posse pati. 180 
Si minus, est animus nobis effundere vitam ; 

in me crudelis non potes esse diu. 
adspicias utinam, quae sit scribentis imago ! 

scribimus, et gremio Troicus ensis adest, 
perque genas lacrimae strictum labuntur in 

ensem, 185 

qui iam pro lacrimis sanguine tinctus erit. 
quam bene conveniunt fato tua munera nostro ! 

instruis inj)ensa nostra sepulcra brevi. 
nec mea nunc primum feriuntur pectora telo ; 

ille locus saevi vulnus amoris habet. 190 
Anna soror, soror Anna, meae male conscia culpae, 

iam dabis in cineves ultima dona meos. 

1 ultro P. 

96 



THE HEROIDKS VII 



stood against you. If you shame to have ine your 
wife, let me nut be called bride, but hostess ; 
so she be yours, Dido will endure to be what 
you will. 

169 Well do I know the seas that break upon 
Afriean shores ; they" have their times of granting 
and denying the way. When the breeze permits, 
you shall give your canvas to the gale ; now the 
light seaweed detains your ship by the strand. 
Entrust me with the "watching of the skies; you 
shall go later, and I myself, though yon desire it, 
will not let you to stay. Your comrades, too, de- 
mand repose, and your shattered fleet, but half 
refitted, ealls for a short delay ; by your past kind- 
nesses, and by that other debt I still, perhaps, shall 
owe you, by my hope of wedlock, I ask for a little 
time — while the sea and my love grow calm, while 
through time and wont I learn the strength to 
endure my sorrows bravely. 

1S1 If you yield not, my purpose is fixed to pour 
forth my life ; you can not be cruel to me for long. 
Could you but see now the face of her who writes 
these words ! I write, and the Trojan's blade is 
ready in my lap. Over my checks the tears 
roll, and fall upon the drawn steel— which soon 
shall be stained with blood instead of tears. How 
fitting is your gift in my hour of fate ! You furnish 
forth my death at a eost but slight. Nor does 
my heart ■ now for the first time feel a weapon's 
thrust ; it already bears the wound of cruel 
love. 

191 Anna my sister, my sister Anna, wretched 
sharer in the knowledge of my fault, soon shall yon 
give to my ashes the last boon. Nor when I have 

97 

n 



OVID 

nec consumpta rogis inscribar Elissa Sychaei, 
hoc tamen in tumuli marmore carmen erit : 

PRAEBUIT AENEAS ET CAUSAM MORTIS ET ENSEM ; 195 
IPSA SUA DIDO CONCIDIT USA MANU, 

VIII' 

Hermione Oresti 

1 Pyrrhus Achillides, animosus imagine patris, 3 

inclusam contra iusque piumque tenet, 
quod potui, renui, ne non in vita tcnerer ; 5 

cetera femineae non valuere manus. 
" quid facis, Aeacide ? non sum sine vindice/' dixi : 

" haec tibi sub domino est, Pyrrlie, puella suo ! 
surdior ille freto clamantem nomen Orestis 

traxit inornatis in sua tecta comis. 10 
quid gravius caj)ta Lacedaenione serva tulissem, 

si raperet Graias barbara turba nurus ? 
parcius Andromachen vexavit Acbaia victrix, 

cum Danaus Phrygias ureret ignis opes. 
At tu, cura mei si te pia tangit, Oreste, 15 

inice non timidas in tua iura manus ! 

1 vv. 1, 2 spurious, but given in Aid. Burm. : see note to V, title. 

a A legal allusion : a vindex was one who undertook the 
defence of a person seized for debt. 

6 Andromache's son Astyanax was thrown from the walls 



THE HEROIDES VIII 



been consumed upon the pyre, shall my inscription 
read: elissa, wife of sychaeus ; yet there shall be- 
on the marble of my tomb these lines : 

FnO.M AENEAS CAME THE CAUSE OF 1 1 Ell DEATH, 
AND FROM HIM THE BLADE; FIIOM THE HAND OF 
DIDO HERSELF CAME THE STROKE BY WHICH SHE FELL. 

VIII 

Hermione to Orestes 

Pyrrhus, Aehilles' son, in self-will the image 
of his sire, holds me in durance against every 
law of earth and heaven. All that lay in my 
power 1 have done — I have refused consent to be 
held ; farther than that my woman's hands could not 
avail. " What art thou doing, son of Aeaeus ? I laek 
not one to take my part ! " a I eried. " This is a 
woman, I tell thee, Pyrrhus, who has a master of her 
own ! " Deafer to me than the sea as 1 shrieked 
out the name of Orestes, he dragged me with hair 
all disarrayed into his palace. What worse my lot 
had Lacedaemon been taken and I been made a 
slave, carried away by the barbarian rout with the 
daughters of Greece ? Less misused by the victorious 
Achaeans was Andromache herself, what time the 
Danaan fire consumed the wealth of Phrygia. 6 

15 Hut do you, if your heart is touched with any 
natural care for me, Orestes, lay claim to your 
right with mo timid hand. What! should anyone 

of Troy, and she became the prize of Pyrrhus (also railed 
Xeoptolemus). She was afterwards given by him t*J 
Helenus. 

99 

II 2 



OVID 



an siquis rapiat stabulis armenta reclusis, 

arma feras, 1 rapta coniuge lentus eris ? 
sit socer exemplo nuptae repetitor ademptae, 

cui pia militiae causa puella fuit ! 20 
si socer ignavus vidua stertisset in aula, 

nupta foret Paridi mater, ut ante fuit. 
Nec tu mille rates sinuosaque vela pararis 

nec numeros Danai militis — ipse veni ! 
sic quoque eram repetenda tamen, nec turpe 

marito 25 

aspera pro caro bella tulisse toro. 
quid, quod avus nobis idem Pelopeius Atreus, 

et, si non esses vir mihi, frater ei'as. 
vir, pre cor, uxori, frater succurre sorori ! 

instant officio nomina bina tuo. 30 
Me tibi Tyndareus, vita gravis auctor et annis, 

tradidit ; arbitrium neptis habebat avus. 
at pater Aeacidae promiserat inscius acti ; 

plus quoque, qui prior est ordine, posset 2 avus. 
cum tibi nubebam, nulli mea taeda nocebat ; 35 

si iungar Pyrrho, tu mihi laesus eris. 
et pater ignoscet nostro Menelaus amori — 

succubuit telis praepetis ipse dei. 
quern sibi permisit, genero concedet amorem ; 

proderit exemplo mater amata suo. 40 
tu mihi, quod matri pater est ; quas egerat olim 

Dardanius partis advena, Pyrrhus agit. 

1 feras P : feres s. 

2 posset P G &i : pussit s and, early editions : pollet Bent. 



IOO 



a Frater is often so used. 



THE HEROIDES VIII 



break open your pens and steal away your herds, 
would you resort to arms ? and when your wife is 
stolen away will you be slow to move? Let your 
father-in-law Menelaus be your example, he who 
demanded back the wife taken from him, and had in 
a woman righteous cause for war. 1 lad he been 
spiritless, and drowsed in his deserted halls, my 
mother would still be wed to Paris, as she was before. 

23 Vet make not ready a thousand ships with 
bellying sails, and hosts of Danaiin soldiery — your- 
self come ! Vet even thus I might well have been 
sought back, nor is it unseemly for a husband to 
have endured fierce combat for love of his marriage- 
bed. Remember, too, the same grandsire is ours, 
Atreus, Pelops' son, and, were you not husband to 
me, you would still be cousin." Husband, I entreat, 
succour your wife ; brother, your sister ! Both bonds 
press you on to your duty. 

31 I was given to you by Tyndareus, weighty 
of counsel both for his life and for his years ; the 
grandsire was arbiter of the grandchild's fate. Hut 
my father, it might be said, had promised me to 
Aeaeus' son, not knowing this; yet my grandsire, 
who is first in order, should also be first in power. 
When I was wed to you, my union brought harm 
to none ; if I wed with Pyrrhus, 1 shall deal 
a wound to you. My father Menelaus, too. will 
pardon our love — he himself succumbed to the darts 
of the winged god. The love he allowed himself, 
he will concede to his daughter's chosen ; my 
mother, loved by him, will aid with her precedent. 
Vou are to me what my sire is to my mother, and 
the part which once the Dardanian stranger played, 
Pyrrhus now plays. Let him be endlessly proud 

lOI 



OVID 



ille licet patriis sine fine superbiat actis ; 

et til, quae referas facta parentis, habes. 
Tantalides omnis ipsnmque regebat Achillem. 45 

hie pars militiae ; dux erat ille ducum. 
tu quoque habes proavum Pelopem Pelopisque paren- 
tem ; 

si melius numeres, a love quintus eris. 
Nec virtute cares, arraa invidiosa tulisti, 

sed tibi — quid faceres ? — induit ilia pater. 1 50 
materia vellem fortis meliore fuisses ; 

non lecta est open, sed data causa tuo. 
hanc tam en inplesti ; iuguloque Aegisthus aperto 

tecta cruentavit, quae pater ante tuus. 
increpat Aeacides landeinqne in crimina vertit — 55 

et tam en adspectus sustinet ille meos. 
rumpor, et ora mihi pariter cum mente tumescunt, 

pectoraque inclnsis ignibus usta dolent. 
Hermione coram quisquamne obiecit Oresti, 

nec mihi sunt vires, nec ferus ensis adest ? 60 
flere licet certe ; flendo defundimus iram, 

perque sinum lacrimae fluminis instar eunt. 
has solas habeo semper semperque profundo ; 

ument incultae fonte perenne genae. 
Num generis fato, quod nostros errat in annos, 65 

Tantalides matres apta rapina snmns ? 

1 So Hous. : Seel tu quid faceres ? others. 

a Jupiter, Tantalus, Pelops, Atreus, Agamemnon, Orestes 
— realty sixth. 

6 During Agamemnon's absence, Aegisthus won Clytem- 
nestra's heart, and the two compassed the king's death. 
After seven years of reigning, Aegisthus and Clytemnestra 
were slain by her son Orestes. 

102 



THE HEROIDES VIII 



because of his father's deeds ; you, too, have a sire's 
achievements of which to boast. The son of Tantalus 
was ruler over all, over Achilles himself. The one 
was but a part of the soldier band ; the other was 
chief of chiefs. You, too, have ancestors — Pelops, 
and the father of Pelops : should vou care to count 
more closely, you could call yourself fifth from 
Jove. rt 

49 Nor are you without your prowess. The arms 
you wielded were hateful — but what were vou to 
do? — your father placed them in your hand. I 
could wish that fortune had given you more ex- 
cellent matter for courage ; but the cause thai 
called forth your deed was not chosen — it was 
fixed. The call you none the less obeyed ; and 
the pierced throat of Aegisthus stained with blood 
the dwelling your father's blood had reddened 
before. 6 The son of Acacus ;issails your name, 
and turns your praise to blame — and yet shrinks 
not before my gaze. I burst with anger, and my 
face swells with passion no less than my heart, and 
my breast burns with the pains of pent-up wrath. 
Has anyone in hearing of Hermionc said aught 
against Orestes, and have J no strength, and no 
keen sword at hand ? I can wee]), at least. In 
weeping I let pour forth my ire, and over my bosom 
course the tears like a Mowing stream. These only 
I still have, and still do I let them gush ; my 
cheeks are wet and unsightly from their never- 
ending fount. 

05 Can it be some fate has come upon our house 
and pursued it through the years even to my time, 
that we Tantalid women are ever victims ready to the 
ravishcr's hand? I shall not rehearse the lying 

i°3 



OVID 



non ego fluminei referam mendacia cygni 

nec querar in plumis delituisse Iovem. 
qua duo porrectus longe freta distinet Isthmos, 

vecta peregrinis Hippodamia rotis ; 1 70 
Taenaris Idaeo trans aequora ab hospite rapta 73 

Argolieas pro se vertit in arma manus. 
vix equidem memini, memini tamen. omnia luctus, 75 

omnia solliciti plena timoris erant ; 
flebat avus Phoebeque soror fratresque gemelli, 

orabat superos Leda suumque Iovem. 
ipsa ego, non longos etiamtunc scissa capillos, 

clamabam : " sine me, me sine, mater, abis ? " 80 
nam coniunx aberat ! ne non Pelopeia credar, 

ecce, Neoptolemo praeda parata fui ! 
Pelides utinam vitasset Apollinis arcus ! 

damnaret nati facta proterva pater ; 
nec quondam placuit nec nunc placuisset Achilli 85 

abducta viduum coniuge flere virum. 
quae mea caelestis iniuria fecit iniquos, 

quodve mihi miserae sidus obesse querar ? 
parva mea sine matre fui, pater arma ferebat, 

et duo ( cum vivant, orba duobus eram. 90 
non tibi blanditias primis, mea mater, in annis 

incerto dictas ore puella tub ; 
non ego captavi brevibus tua colla lacertis 

nec gremio sedi sarcina grata tuo. 
non cultus tibi cura mei, nec pacta marito 95 

intravi tbalamos matre parante novos. 

1 71, 72 spurious Pa : 

Castori Amyclaeo et Amyclaeo Polluci 
reddita Mopsopia Taenaris nrbe soror ; 

° The story of Leda and the swan. b Pelops won her 

in the race with Oenomaus, her father, whose death he com- 
passed by tampering with Oenomaus' charioteer Myrtilus. 

c Apollo directed the arrow of Paris which wounded 
Achilles in the heel, his only vulnerable part. 
104 



THE HEROIDES VIII 



words of the swan upon the stream, nor complain of 
Jove disguised in plumage." Where the sea is 
sundered in two by the far-stretched Isthmus, 
Hippodamia 6 was borne away in the ear of the 
stranger ; she of Taenarus, stolen away across the 
seas by the stranger-guest from Ida, roused to arms 
in her behalf all the men of Argos. I scarcely 
remember, to be sure, yet remember I do. All was 
grief, everywhere anxiety and fear ; my grandsire 
wept, and my mother's sister Phoebe, and the twin 
brothers, and Leda fell to praying the gods above, and 
her own Jove. As for myself, tearing my locks, not 
yet long, I began to cry aloud : iC Mother, will you go 
away, and will you leave me behind?" For her lord 
was gone. Lest J be thought none of Pelops' line, lo, 
I too have been left a ready prey for Neoptolemus ! 

83 Would that Peleus' son had escaped the how of 
Apollo ! c The father would condemn the son for 
his wanton deed ; 'twas not of yore the pleasure of 
Achilles, nor would it be now his pleasure, to see 
a widowed husband weeping for his stolen wife. 
What wrong have I done that heaven's hosts are 
against me? or what constellation shall I complain is 
hostile to my wretched self? In my childhood 1 had 
no mother; my father was ever in the wars — though 
the two were not dead, I was reft of both. You 
were not near in my first years, O my mother, to 
receive the caressing prattle from the tripping 
tongue of the little girl ; I never clasped about your 
neck the little arms that would not reach, and never 
sat, a burden sweet, upon your lap. I was not 
reared and cared for by your hand ; and when 1 was 
promised in wedlock I had no mother to make ready 
the new chamber for my coining. I went out to 



,Q 5 



OVID 



obvia prodicram reduci tibi — vera fatebor — 

nec facies nobis nota parentis erat ! 
te tamen esse Helenen, quod eras pulcherrima, sensi ; 

ipsa requirebas, quae tua nata foret ! 100 
Pars haec una mihi, eoniunx bene eessit Orestes ; 

is quoque, ni pro se pugnat, ademptus erit. 
Pyrrhus habet eaptam reduce et "victore.parente — 

hoc minius ! nobis 1 diruta Troia dedit ! 
cum tamen altus equis Titan radiantibus instate 105 

perfruor infelix liberiore malo ; 
nox ubi me thalamis ululantem et acerba gementem 

coudidit in maesto procubuique toro, 
pro sonino lacrimis oculi funguntur obortis, 

quaque licet, fugio sicut ab hoste viro. 110 
saepe malis stupeo rerumque oblita locique 

ignara tetigi Scyria membra manu, 
utque nefas sensi, male corpora tacta relinquo 

et mihi pollutas credor habere maims, 
saepe Neoptolemi pro nomine nonien Orestis 115 

exit, et errorem vocis ut omen amo. 
Per genus infelix iuro generisque parentem, 

qui freta, qui terras et sua regna quatit ; 
per patris ossa tui, patrui mihi, quae tibi debent, 

quod se sub tumulo fortiter ulta iacent — 120 
aut ego praemoriar primoque exstingiiar in aevo, 

ant ego Tantalidae Tantalis uxor ero ! 

1 So Gi Merle. Pa.: et minus a nobis P: munus et hoc 
nobis s Plan.: munus et a! nobis Elite. 



THE IIEHOIDES VIII 



meet you when you c;inie hack home — what I shall 
say is truth — and the face of my mother was unknown 
to me ! That you were Helen 1 none the less knew, 
because you were most beautiful ; but you — you had 
to ask who your daughter was ! 

101 This one favour of fortune has been mine — to 
have Orestes for my wedded mate ; but he. too. will 
be taken from me if he does not fi<rht for his own. 
Pyrrhns holds me captive, though my father is 
returned and a victor — this is the boon brought me 
by the downfall of Troy ! Yet my unhappy soul has 
the comfort, when Titan is urging aloft his radiant 
steeds, of being more free in its wretchedness : but 
when the dark of night has fallen and scut me to mv 
chamber with wails and lamentation for my bitter lot. 
and I have stretched myself prostrate on my sorrowful 
bed, then springing tears, not slumber, is the service 
of mine eyes, and in everv wav I can I shrink from 
my mate as from a foe. Oft I am distraught 
with woe ; I lose sense of where I am and what my 
fate, and with witless hand have touched the body of 
him of Scyrus ; but when I have waked to the awful 
act, I draw my hand from the base contact, and look 
upon it as defiled. Oft, instead of Neuptolemus the 
name of Orestes comes forth, and the mistaken 
word is a treasured omen. 

117 By our unhappy line I swear, and by the parent 
of our line, he who shakes the seas, the land, and 
his own realms on high ; by the bones of your father, 
uncle to me, which owe it to you that bravely 
avenged they lie beneath their burial mound either 
I shall die before my time and in my youthful years be 
blotted out, or I, a Tantalid. shall be the wife of him 
sprung from Tantalus ! 

107 



OVID 



IX 

Deianira Herculi 

Gratulor Oechaliam titulis accedere nostris ; 

victorem victae succubuisse queror. 
fama Pelasgiadas subito pervenit in urbes . 

decolor et factis infitianda tuis, 
quern niimquam Iuno seriesque inmensa laborum 5 

fregerit, huic Iolen inposuisse iugum. 
hoc velit Eurystheus, velit hoc germana Tonantis, 

laetaque sit vitae labe noverca tuae ; 
at non ille velit, cui nox — sic creditur — una 

uon tanta, 1 ut tantus^ eonciperere, fuit. 10 
Plus tibi quam Iuno, nocuit Venus : ilia premendo 

sustulit, haec humili 2 sub pede colla tenet, 
respice vindicibus pacatum viribus orbem, 

qua latam Nereus caevulus ambit hiimiim. 
se tibi pax-terrae, tibi se tuta aequora debent ; 15 

inplesti meritis solis utramque donium. 
quod te laturum est, caelum prius ipse tulisti ; 

Hercule supposito sidera fulsit Atlans. 
quid nisi notitia est misero quaesita pudori, 

si cumulus stupri facta priora notat ? 20 

1 tanta s Iahn Loers van Lennep : tanti P G w. 

2 humilis P G w Btnt. Ehw. 



a The Trachiniae of Sophocles dramatizes the Deianira 
story, and Apollodorns contains it. See also Ovid, Metam. 
ix. 1-273, and Seneca, Herruhs Oefaeus. 

* Who imposed the twelve labours on Hercules at the 
instigation of Juno. 

ioS 



THE HE110IDES IX 



IX 

Deianira to Hercules 

" I render thanks tliat Oeehalia has been added 
to the list of our honours ; but that the vietor has 
yielded to the vanquished, I complain. The rumour 
has suddenly spread to all the Pelasgian cities — a 
rumour unseemly, to which your deeds should give 
the lie — that on the man whom Juno's unending 
series of labours has never crushed, on him Iole has 
plaeed her yoke. This would please Eurystheus, 6 
and it would please the sister of the Thunderer : 
stepdaine c that she is, she would gladly know of 
the stain upon your life ; but 'twould give no joy to 
him for whom, so 'tis believed, a single night did not 
suffice for the begetting of one so great. 

11 More than Juno, Venus has been your bane. 
The one, by erushing you down, has raised vou 
up ; the other has your neck beneath her humbling 
foot. Look but on the cirele of the earth made 
peaceful by your protecting strength, wherever the 
blue waters of Nereus wind round the broad land. 
To you is owing peace upon the earth, to you safety 
on the seas; you haye filled with worthy deeds 
both abodes of the sun. d The heaven that is to bear 
you, yourself once bore ; Hercules bent to thy load 
of the stars when Atlas was their stay. What have 
you gained but to spread the knowledge of your 
wretehed shame, if a final act of baseness blots 
your former deeds ? Can it be you that men say 

c Jupiter was the father of Hercules l»y Aleinene. 
a Farthest east autl w est. 

tog 



OVID 



tene ferunt geminos pressisse tenaciter angues, 

cum tener in cunis iam love dignus eras ? 
coepisti melius quam desinis ; ultima primis 

cedunt ; dissimiles hie vir et ille puer. 
quern 11011 mille ferae, quern non Stheneleius 
hostis, 25 

non potuit luno vincere, vincit amor. 
At bene nupta feror, q\iia nominer Herculis uxor, 

sitque socer, rapidis qui tonat altus equis. 
quam male inaequales veniunt ad aratra iuvenci, 

tarn premitur magno coniuge nupta minor. 30 
non honor est sed onus species laesura ferentis ; 

siqua voles apte nubere, nube pari, 
vir mihi semper abest, et coniuge notior hospes, 

monstraque terribiles persequiturque feras. 
ipsa domo vidua votis operata pudicis 35 

torqueor, infesto ne vir ab hoste cadat : 
inter serpentes aprosque avidosque leones 

iactor et haesuros tenia per ora canes, 
me pecudum fibrae simulacraque inania somni 

omniaque arcana nocte petita movent. 40 
aucupor infelix incertae murmura famae, 

speque timor dubia spesque timore cadit. 
mater abest queriturque deo placuisse potenti, 

nec pater Amphitryon nec puer Hyllus adest ; 
arbiter Eurystheus irae Iunonis iniquae 45 

sentitur nobis iraque longa deae. 
1 io 



THE HERO IDES IX 



clutched tight the serpents twain while a tender babe 
in the cradle, already worthy of Jove ? You began 
better than you end ; your last deeds yield to vour 
first ; the man you are and the child you were arc 
not the same. He whom not a thousand wild beasts, 
whom not the Stheneleian foe, whom not Juno could 
overcome, love overcomes. 

27 Yet. I am said to be well mated, because I am 
called the wife of Hereules, and beeause the father 
of my lord is he who thunders on high with im- 
petuous steeds. As the ill-mated steer yoked 
miserably at the plough, so fares the wife who is less 
than her mighty lord. It is not honour, but mere 
fair-seeming, and brings dole to us who bear the 
load ; would you be wedded happily, wed your 
equal. My lord is ever absent from me — he is 
better known to me as guest than husband — ever 
pursuing monsters and dreadful beasts. I myself, at 
home and widowed, am busied with chaste prayers, 
in torment lest my husband fall by the savage 
foe ; with serpents and with boars and ravening 
lions my imaginings are full, and With hounds 
three-throated hard upon the prey. The entrails 
of slain vietims stir my fears, the idle images of 
dreams, and the omen sought in the mysterious night. 
Wretchedly I cateh at the uncertain murmurs of the 
common talk ; my 'fear is lost in wavering hope, my 
hope again in fear. Your mother is away, and 
laments that she ever pleased the potent god, and 
neither your father Amphitryon is here, nor your son 
Hyllus; the acts of Eurystheus, the instrument of 
Juno's unjust wrath, and the long-eontimied anger 
of the goddess — I am the one to feel. 

1 1 i 



OVID 



Haec mihi ferre ])arum ? peregrinos addis amores, 

et mater de te quaelibet esse potest, 
non ego Partheniis temeratam vallibus Augen, 

nec referam partus, Ormeni nympha, tuos ; 50 
non tibi crimen erunt, Teuthrantia turba, sorores, 

quarum de populo nulla relicta tibi est. 
una, recens crimen, referetnr adultera nobis, 

unde ego sum Lydo facta noverca Lamo. 
Maeandros, terris totiens errator in isdem, 55 

qui lassas in se saepe retorquet aquas, 
vidit in Herculeo suspensa monilia collo 

illo, cui caelum sarcina parva fuit. 
non })uduit fortis auro cohibere lacertos, 

et solidis gemmas opposuisse toris ? 60 
nempe sub his animam pestis Nemeaea lacertis 

edidit, unde umerus tegmina laevus habet ! 
ausus es hirsutos mitra redimire capillos ! 

aptior Herculeae populus alba comae, 
nec te Maeonia lascivae more puellae 65 

incingi zona dedecuisse pudet ? 1 
non tibi succurrit crudi Diomedis imago, 

efferus humana qui dape pavit equas ? 
si te vidisset cultu Busiris in isto, 

huic victor victo 2 nempe pudendus eras. 70 
detrahat Antaeus duro redimicula collo, 

ne pigeat molli succubuisse viro. 
Inter Ioniacas calathum tenuisse puellas 

diceris et dominae pertimuisse minas. 

1 pudet P G u> : putas s Burm. : putes Leidensis : patet Pa. 

2 Hie /// victor victo P ; huic u> : victori victo . . . erat Pa. 

' a There were fifty of them, and their father Thespius 
wished for fifty grandchildren by Hercules. 

4 Hercules was the lover of Omphale, or Iardanis (v. 103), 
queen of Lydia, sold to her by Hermes as a slave. 



112 



THE HEROIDES IX 



47 Is this too little for me to endure ? You add 
to it your stranger loves, and whoever will . may 
be by you a mother. I will say nothing of Auge 
betrayed in the vales of Parthenius, or of thy travail, 
nymph sprung of Ormenus ; nor will I charge 
against you the daughters of Teuthras' son, the 
throng of sisters from whose number none was 
spared by you." But there is one love — a fresh 
offence of which I have heard — a love by which 
I am made stepdame to Lydian Lamus. 6 The 
Meander, so many times wandering in the same 
lands, who oft turns back upon themselves his 
wearied waters, has seen hanging from the neck of 
Hercules — the neck which found the heavens but 
slight burden — bejewelled chains ! Felt you no 
shame to bind with gold those strong arms, and to 
set the gem upon that solid brawn ? Ah, to think 
'twas these arms that crushed the life from the 
Nemean pest, whose skin now covers your left side ! 
You have not shrunk from binding your shaggy hair 
with a woman's turban ! More meet for the locks 
of Hercules were the white poplar. And for you to 
disgrace yourself by wearing the Maeonian zone, 
like a wanton girl — feel you no shame for that ? 
Did there come to vour mind no image of savage 
Diomede, fiercely feeding his mares on human meat? 
Had Busiris seen you in that garb, he whom you 
vanquished would surely have reddened for such a 
victor as you. Antaeus would tear from the hard 
neck the turban-bands, lest he feel shame at having 
succumbed to an unmanly foe. 

73 They say that you have held the wool-basket 
among the girls of Ionia, and been frightened at 
your mistress' threats. Do you not shrink, Aleides, 



OVID 



non fugis, Alcide, victricem mille laborum 75 

rasilibus calathis inposuisse manum, 
crassaque robusto deducis pollice fila, 

aequaque formosae pensa rependis erae ? 
a., quotiens digitis dum torques stamina duris, 

praevalidae fusos conminuere manus ! 80 
ante pedes dominae 1 . . . . 

factaque narrabas dissimulanda tibi — 8i 
scilicet inmanes elisis faucibus hydros 85 

infantem caudis iiivoluisse manum, 
ut Tegeaeus aper cupressifero Erymantho 

incubet et vasto pondere laedat humuni. 
non tibi Threiciis adfixa penatibus ora, 

non honiinum pingues caede tacentur equae ; 90 
prodigiumque triplex, arnienti dives Hiberi 

Geryones, quamvis in tvibus unus erat ; 
inque canes totidem trunco digestus ab uno 

Cerberos inplicitis angue minante comis ; 
quaeque redundabat fecundo vulnere serpens 95 

fertilis et daninis dives ab ipsa suis ; 
quique inter laevumque latus laevunique lacertum 

praegrave conpressa fauce pependit onus ; 
et male confisum pedibus formaque bimembri 

pulsum Thessalicis agmen equestre iugis. 100 
Haec tu Sidonio potes insignitus amictu 

dicere ? non cultu lingua retenta silet ? 
se quoque nympha tuis ornavit Iardajiis armis 

et tulit a capto nota tropaea viro. 
1 81, half of 82, and 83, spurious, Merle. Pa. 

crederis infelix scuticae tremefactus habenis 

ante pedes dominae pertiimiisse minas . . . 
eximias pompaa, inmauia semina laudum. 

114 



THE HKR01DES IX 



from laying to the polished wool-basket the hand 
that triumphed over a thousand toils ; do you draw 
off with stalwart thumb the coarsely spun strands, 
and give back to the hand of a prettv mistress the 
just portion she weighed out? Ah, how often, 
while with dour finger you twisted the thread, have 
your too strong hands crushed the spindle ! Before 
your mistress' feet .... and told of the deeds of 
which you should now say naught — of enormous 
serpents, throttled and coiling their lengths about 
your infant hand ; how the Tegeaean boar has his 
lair on cypress-bearing Erymanthus, and afflicts the 
ground with his vast weight. You do not omit the 
skulls nailed up in Thracian homes, nor the mares 
made fat with the flesh of slain men ; nor the triple 
prodigy. Geryones, rich in Iberian cattle, who was 
one in three ; nor Cerberus, branching from one 
trunk into a three-fold dog, his hair inwoven with 
the threatening snake ; nor the fertile serpent that 
sprang forth again from the fruitful wound, grown 
rich from her own hurt ; nor him whose mass 
hung heavy between your left side and left arm as 
your hand clutched his throat ; nor the equestrian 
array that put ill trust in their feet and dual form, 
confounded by you on the ridges of Thessaly. 

101 These deeds can you recount, gaily arrayed in 
a Sidonian gown ? Docs not your dress rob from 
your tongue all utterance ? The nymph-daughter 
of lardanus ft has even tricked herself out in your 
arms, and won famous triumphs from the vanquished 
" Omphale. 

1 «5 

1 '2 



OVID 



i nunc, tolle animos et fortia gesta recense ; 105 

quo 1 tu non esses, hire vir ilia fuit. 
qua tanto minor es, quanto te, maxim e rerum, 

quam quos vicisti, vincere mains erat. 
illi procedit rerum mensura tuarum — 

cede bonis ; heres laudis arnica tuae. 1 1 

o pudor ! hirsuti costis exuta leonis 

aspera texerunt vellera molle latus ! 
falleris et nescis — non sunt spolia ilia leonis, 

sed tua, tuque feri victor es, ilia tui. 
femina tela tulit Lernaeis atra venenis, 115 

ferre gravem lana vix satis apta colum, 
instruxitque manum clava domitrice ferarum, 

vidit et in speculo coniugis arma sui ! 
Haec tamen audieram ; licuit non credere famae, 

et venit ad sensus mollis ab aure dolor — 120 
ante meos oculos adducitur advena paelex, 

nec mihij quae patior, dissimulare licet ! 
non sinis averti ; mediam captiva per urbem 

invitis oculis adspicienda venit. 
nec venit incultis captarum more capillis, 125 

fortunam vultu fassa decente 2 suam ; 
ingreditur late lato spectabilis auro> 

qualiter in Phrygia tu quoque cultus eras, 
dat vultum populo sublimis ut 3 Hercule victo ; 

Oechaliam vivo stare parente putes. 130 

1 quo Pa. : quern Pj : quod P 2 G to : quom Mailt: 

2 So van Lennep : vultu fassa tegente P. 

3 So early editions, Plan : sublime sub Hercule victo P G u. 



« Iole. 



THE HEROIDES IX 



hero. Go now, puff up your spirit and recount your 
brave deeds done ; she has proved herself a man by 
a right you could not urge. You are as much less 
than she, O greatest of men, as it was greater to 
vanquish you than those you vanquished. To her 
passes the full measure of your exploits — yield up 
what you possess ; your mistress is heir to your praise. 
O shame, that the rough skin stripped from the 
flanks of the shaggy lion has covered a woman's 
delicate side ! You are mistaken, and know it not — 
that spoil is not from the lion, but from you ; you 
are victor over the beast, but she over you. A 
woman has borne the darts blackened with the 
venom of Lema, a woman scarce strong enough to 
carry the spindle heavy with wool ; a woman has 
taken in her hand the club that overcame wild 
beasts, and in the mirror gazed upon the armour of 
her lord ! 

119 These things, however, I had only heard ; I 
could distrust men's words, and the pain hit on my 
senses softly, through the ear — but now my very 
eyes must look upon a stranger-mistress a led before 
them, nor may I now dissemble what I suffer ! You 
do not allow me to turn away ; the woman comes a 
captive through the city's midst, to be looked upon 
by my unwilling eyes. Nor comes she after the 
manner, of captive women, with hair unkempt, 
and with beeoming countenance that tells to all 
her lot; she strides along, sightly from afar in 
plenteous gold, apparelled in such wise as you your- 
self in Phrygia. She looks straight out at the 
throng, with head held high, as if 'twere she had 
conquered Hercules ; you might think Oechalia 
standing yet, and her father yet alive. Perhaps you 



117 



OVID 



forsitan et pulsa Aetolide Deianira 

nomine deposito paelicis uxor erit, 
Euiytidosque Ioles atque Aonii 1 Alcidae 

turpia famosus corpora iunget Hymen, 
mens fugit admonitu, frigusque perambulat artus, 1 35 

et iacet in gremio languida facta manus. 
Me quoque cum multis, sed me sine crimine amasti. 

ne pigeat, pugnae bis tibi causa fui. 
cornua flens legit ripis Achelous in udis 

truncaque limosa tempora mersit aqua ; 140 
semivir occubuit in lotifero Eueno 2 

Nessus, et infecit sanguis equinus aquas, 
sed quid ego haec refero ? scribenti nuntia venit 

fama, virum tunicae tabe perire meae. 
ei mihi ! quid feci ? quo me furor egit aman- 

tem ? 145 

inpia quid dubitas Deianira mori ? 
An tuus in media coniunx lacerabitur Oeta, 

tu sceleris tanti causa superstes eris ? 
siquid adhuc habeo facti, cur Herculis uxor 

credar, coniugii mors mea pignus erit ! 150 
tu quoque cognosces in me, Meleagre, sororem ! 

inpia quid dubitas Deianira mori ? 
Heu devota domus ! solio sedet Agrios alto ; 

Oenea desertum nuda senecta premit. 
exulat ignotis Tydeus germanus in oris ; 155 

alter fatali vivus in igne fuit ; 

1 atque Aonii Bent. Merle. : et insanii P : insani G. 

2 lotifero Bent.: Eueno Hein.: letiferoque veneno G : in 
lorifero eueneno Guelf. 3 : in letifero Eueno Hein. Burm. etc. 

a His poisoned blood is in the robe she sends to Hercules. 
* Agrius drove out Oeneus his brother after Meleager's 
death. 

c By Oeneus, for slaying a brother. 

d Meleager perished when his mother Althea, in revenge 
Ii8 



THE HEROIDES IX 



will even drive away Aetolian Deianira, and her rival 
will lay aside the name of mistress, and be made 
your wife. Iole, the daughter of Eurytus, and 
Aonian Alcides will be basely joined in shameful 
bonds of Hymen. My mind fails me at the thought, 
a chill sweeps through my frame, and my hand lies 
nerveless in my lap. 

137 Me, too, you have possessed among your many 
loves — but me with no reproach. Regret it not — 
twice you have fought for the sake of me. In tears 
Aehelous gathered up his horns on the wet banks of 
his stream, and bathed in its clayey tide his mutilated 
brow ; the half-man Nessus sank down in lotus- 
bearing Euenus, tingeing its waters with his equine 
blood. a But why am I reciting things like these ? 
Even as I write comes rumour to me saying my 
lord is dying of the poison from my cloak. Alas 
me ! what have I done ? Whither has madness 
driven me in my love ? O wicked Deianira, why 
hesitate to die ? 

147 Shall thy lord be torn to death on midmost 
Oeta, and shalt thou, the cause of the monstrous 
deed, remain alive ? If I have yet done aught to win 
the name of wife of Hercules, my death shall be the 
pledge of our union. Thou, Meleager, shalt also 
see in me a sister of thine own ! O wicked Deianira, 
why hesitate to die ? 

153 Alas, for my devoted house ! Agrius sits on 
the lofty throne ; 6 Oeneus is reft of all, and 
barren old age weighs heavy on him. Tydeus my 
brother is exiled on an unkziown shore ;<" my second 
brother's life hung on the fateful fire ; d our mother 

for his slaying her brother, finally burned the brand on 
whose preservation the Fates had said his life depended. 

n 9 



OVID 



exegit ferrum sua per praecordia mater. 

inpia quid dubitas Deianira mori ? 
Deprecor hoc unum per iura sacerrima lectin 

ne videar fatis insidiata tuis. 160 
Nessus, ut est avidum percussus harundine pectus, 

" hie/' dixit, " vires sanguis amoris habet." 
inlita Nesseo misi tibi texta veneno. 

inpia quid dubitas Deianira mori ? 
Iamque vale, seniorque pater germanaque Gorge, 165 

et patria et patriae frater adempte tuae, 
et tu lux oculis hodierna novissima nostris, 

virque — sed o possis ! — et puer Hylle, vale ! 

X 

Ariadne Theseo 

Mitius inveni quam te genus omne ferarum ; 

credita non ulli quam tibi peius eram. 
quae legis, ex illo, Theseu, tibi litore mitto 

unde tuam sine me vela tulere ratem, 
in quo me somnusque meus male prodidit et tu, 5 

per facinus somnis insidiate meis. 
Tempus erat, vitrea quo primum terra pruina 

spargitur et tectae fronde queruntur aves. 
incertum vigilans a somno languida movi 

Thesea prensuras semisupina manus — 10 
i 20 



THE HEROIDES X 



drove the steel through her own heart. O wicked 
Deianira, why hesitate to die ? 

159 This one thing 1 deprecate, by the most 
sacred bonds of our marriage-bed — that 1 seem to 
have plotted for your doom. Nessus, stricken with 
the arrow in his lustful heart, "This blood,'' he 
said, " has power over love." The robe of Nessus, 
saturate with poisonous gore, 1 sent to you. O 
wicked Deianira, why hesitate to die ? 

165 And now, fare ye well, O aged father, and O 
my sister Gorge, and O my native soil, and brother 
taken from thy native soil, and thou, O light that 
shinest to-day, the last to strike upon mine eyes ; 
and thou my lord, O fare thou well — would that 
thou couldst ! — and Hyllus, thou my son, farewell to 
thee ! 

X 

Ariadne to Theseus 

Gentler than you I have found every raee of 
wild beasts; to none of them could I so ill have 
trusted as to you. The words you now are reading, 
Theseus, I send you from that shore from which the 
sails bore off your ship without me, the shore on 
which my slumber, and you, so wretchedly betrayed 
me — you, who wickedly plotted against me as I 
slept. 

7 'Twas the time when the earth is first be- 
sprinkled with crystal rime, and songsters hid in 
the branch begin their plaint. Half waking only, 
languid from sleep, I turned upon my side and 
put forth hands to clasp my Theseus — he was not 

1 2 i 



OVID 



nullus erat ! referoque manus iterumque retempto, 

perque torum moveo bracchia — nullus erat ! 
excussere metus soranum ; conterrita surgo, 

membraque sunt viduo praecipitata toro. 
protinus adductis sonuerunt pectora palmis, 15 

utque erat e somno turbida, rapta coma est. 
Luna fuit ; specto, siquid nisi litora cernam. 

quod videant oculi, nil nisi litus habent. 
nunc hue, nunc illuc, et utroque sine ordine, curro ; 

alta puellares tardat harena pedes. 20 
interea toto clamanti 1 litore " Theseu ! " 

reddebant nomen concava saxa tuum, 
et quotiens ego te, totiens locus ipse vocabat. 

ipse locus miserae ferre volebat opem. 
Mons fuit — apparent frutices in vertice rari ; 25 

hinc 2 scopulus raucis pendet adesus aquis. 
adscendo — vires animus dabat — atque ita late 

aequora prospectu metior alta meo. 
inde ego — nam ventis quoque sum crudelibus usa — 

vidi praecipiti carbasa tenta Noto. 30 
ut vidi haut dignam 3 quae me vidisse putarem, 

frigidior glacie semianimisque fui. 
nec languere diu patitur dolor ; excitor illo, 

excitor et summa Thesea voce voco. 
"quo fugis ? " exclamo ; " scelerate revertere 

Theseu! 35 

flecte ratem ! numerum non habet ilia suum ! " 

1 clamanti s Plan.: clamati//// P : clamanti in G : 
clamavi V s Bent.: clamavi in Ehw. 

2 hinc G Burm.: nunc P V: hie, huic s. 

3 So Hous.: aut vidi a///uam quae me P: aut vidi ant 
tamquam quae me G. 



THE HEROIDES X 



there ! I drew back my hands, a second time I 
made essay, and o'er the whole couch moved my 
arms — he was not there ! Fear struck away my 
sleep ; in terror I arose, and threw myself headlong 
from my abandoned bed. Straight then my palms 
resounded upon my breasts, and I tore my hair, all 
disarrayed as it was from sleep. 

17 The moon was shining ; I bend my gaze to see 
if aught but shore lies there. So far as my eyes 
can see, naught do they find but shore. Now this 
way, and now that, and ever without plan, I course ; 
the deep sand stays my girlish feet. And all the 
while I cried out "Theseus! " along the entire shore, 
and the hollow rocks sent back your name to me ; 
as often as I called out for you, so often did the 
place itself call out your name. The very place felt 
the will to aid me in my woe. 

25 There was a mountain, with bushes rising here 
and there upon its top ; a cliff hangs over from it, 
gnawed into bv deep-sounding waves. I climb its 
slope — my spirit gave me strength — and thus with 
prospect broad I scan the billowy deep. From there 
— for T found the winds cruel, too — I beheld your 
sails stretched full by the headlong southern gale. 
As I looked on a sight methought I had not 
deserved to see, I grew colder than ice, and life 
half left my body. Nor does anguish allow me long 
to lie thus quiet ; it rouses me, it stirs me up to call 
on Theseus with all my voice's might. " Whither 
dost fly ? " I cry aloud. " Come back, O wicked 
Theseus ! Turn about thy ship ! She hath not all 
her crew ! " 



123 



OVID 



Haec ego ; quod voci deerat, plangore replebam ; 

verbera cum verbis mixta fuere meis. 
si non audires, ut saltern cernere posses, 

iactatae late signa dedere manus ; 40 
candidaque inposui longae velamina virgae — 

scilicet oblitos admonitura mei ! 
iamque oculis ereptus eras, turn denique flevi ; 

torpuerant molles ante dolore genae. 
quid potius facerent, quarmme mea lumina flerent, 45 

postquam desieram 1 vela videre tua ? 
aut ego diffusis erravi sola capillis, 

qualis ab Ogygio concita Baccha deo, 
aut mare prospiciens in saxo frigida sedi, 

quamque lapis sedeSj tarn lapis ipsa fui. 50 
saepe torum repeto, qui nos acceperat ambos, 

sed non acceptos exhibiturus erat, 
et tua, quae possum pro te, vestigia tango 

strataque quae membris intepuere tuis. 
incumbo, lacrimisque toro manante profusis, 55 

"pressimus/' exclamOj "te duo — redde duos! 
venimus hue ambo ; cur non discedimus ambo ? 

perfidej pars nostrij lectule, maior ubi est? " 
Quid faciam ? quo sola ferar ? vacat insula cultu. 

non hominum video, non ego facta bourn. 60 
omne latus terra e cingit mare ; navita nusquam, 

nulla per ambiguas puppis itura vias. 
finge dari comitesque mihi ventosque ratemque — 

quid sequar ? accessus terra paterna negat. 
1 desieram Poo : desierant s Plan.: desierat G. 

124 



THE HEROIDES X 



37 Thus did I cry, and what my voice could not 
avail, I filled with beating of my breast ; the 
blows I gave myself were mingled with my words. 
That you at least might see, if you could not hear, 
with might and main I sent you signals with 
my hands ; and upon a long tree-branch I fixed my 
shining veil — yes, to put in mind of me those who 
had forgotten ! And now you had been swept 
beyond my vision. Then at last I let flow 
my tears ; till then my tender eyeballs had been 
dulled with pain. What better could my eyes 
do than weep for me, when I had ceased to see 
your sails ? Alone, with hair loose flying, I have 
either roamed about, like to a Bacchant roused by 
the Ogygian god, or, looking out upon the sea, I 
have sat all chilled upon the rock, as much a stone 
myself as was the stone I sat upon. Oft do I 
come again to the eouch that once received us both, 
but was fated never to show us together again, 
and touch the imprint left by you — 'tis all I can in 
place of vou ! — and the stufl's that once grew warm 
beneath your limbs. I lay me down upon my 
face, bedew the bed with pouring tears, and cry 
aloud : " We were two who pressed thee — give back 
two ! We came to thee both together ; why do we 
not depart the same? Ah, faithless bed— the greater 
part of my being, oh, where is he ? 

59 What am I to do ? Whither shall I take 
myself — 1 am alone, and the isle untilled. Of 
human traces I see none ; of cattle, none. On 
every side the land is girt by sea ; nowhere a 
sailor, no craft to make its way over the dubious 
paths. And suppose I did find those to go with 
me, and winds, and ship — yet where am I to go r 



I2 5 



OVID 



ut rate felici pacata per aequora labar, 65 

temperet ut ventos Aeolus — exul ero .' 
non ego te, Crete centum digesta per urbes, 

adspiciam, puero cognita terra Iovi ! 
at pater et tellus iusto regnata parent! 

prodita sunt facto, nomina cara, meo, 70 
cum tibij ne victor tecto morerere recurvo, 

quae regerent passus, pro duce fila dedi, 
cum mihi dicebas : " per ego ipsa pericula iuro, 

te fore, dum nostrum vivet uterque, meam." 
Vivinms, et non sum, Theseu, tua — si modo vivit 75 

femina periuri fraude sepulta viri. 
me quoque, qua fratrem, mactasses, inprobe, clava ; 

esset, quam dederas, morte soluta fides, 
nunc ego non tantum, quae sum passura, recordor, 

sed quaecumque potest ulla relicta pati. SO 
occurrunt animo pereundi mille figurae, 

morsque minus poenae quam mora mortis habet. 
iam iam venturos aut hac aut suspicor iliac, 

qui lament avido viscera dente, lupos. 
quis scit an et 1 fulvos tellus alat ista leones ? 85 

forsitan et saevas tigridas insula habet. 2 
et freta dicuntur magnas expellere phocas ! 

quis vetat et gladios per latus ire meum ? 
Tantum ne religer dura captiva catena, 

neve traham serva grandia pensa manu, 90 

1 Quis scit an made to change place* with forsitan et, for 
the sake of syntax Hons. 

2 saevas tigridas insula habet G : trigides insula habent P : 
et saevam tigrida Dia ferat editor of E. 

° Her aid to Theseus in his slaying of the Minotaur her 
brother, and his escape from the Labyrinth. 

126 



THE HEROIDES X 



My father's realm forbids me to approach. Grant 
I do glide with fortunate keel over peaceful seas, 
that Aeolus tempers the winds — I still shall be an 
exile! 'Tis not for me, O Crete composed of the 
hundred cities, to look upon thee, land known to 
the infant Jove ! No, for my father and the land 
ruled by my righteous father — dear names ! — were 
betrayed by my deed a when, to keep you, after your 
victory, from death in the winding halls, I gave into 
your hand the thread to direct your steps in place of 
guide — when you said to me : "By these very perils 
of mine, I swear that, so long as both of us shall live, 
thou shalt be mine ! " 

75 We both live, Theseus, and I am not yours ! — 
if indeed a woman lives who is buried by the treason 
of a perjured mate. Me, too, you should have 
slain, O false one, with the same bludgeon that slew 
my brother ; then would the oath you gave me 
have been absolved by my death. Now, I ponder 
over not only what I am doomed to suffer, but all 
that any woman left behind can suffer. There 
rush into my thought a thousand forms of perishing, 
and death holds less of dole for me than the delay 
of death. Each moment, now here, now there, 1 
look to see wolves rush on me, to rend my vitals 
with their greedy fangs. Who knows but that this 
shore breeds, too, the tawny lion ? Perelnmee the 
island harbours the savage tiger as well. They say, 
too, that the waters of the deep cast up the mighty 
seal ! And who is to keep the swords of men from 
piercing my side ? 

89 But I eare not, if I am but not left captive 
in hard bonds, and not compelled to spin the 
long task with servile hand — I, whose father is 

127 



OVID 



cui pater est Minos, cui mater filia Phoebi, 

quodque magis memini, quae tibi pacta fui ! 
si mare, si terras porrectaque litora vidi, 

multa mihi terrae, multa minantur aquae, 
caelum restabat — timeo simulacra deorum ! 95 

destituor rapidis praeda cibusque feris ; 
sive colunt habitantque viri, diffidimus illis — 

externos didici laesa timere viros. 
Viveret Androgeos utinam ! nee facta luisses 

inpia funeribus, Cecropi terra, tuis ; 100 
nec tua mactasset nodoso stipite, Theseu, 

ardua parte virum dextera, parte bovem ; 
nec tibi, quae reditus monstrarent, fila dedissem, 

fila per adductas saepe recepta manus. 
lion equidem miror, si stat victoria tecum, 105 

strataque Cretaeam belua planxit 1 huraum. 
non poterant figi praecordia ferrea cornu ; 

ut te non tegeres, pectore tutus eras, 
illic tu silices, illic adamanta tulisti, 

illic qui silices, Thesea, vincat, babes. 110 
Crudeles somni, quid me tenuistis inertem ? 

aut seme! aeterna nocte premenda fui. 
vos quoque crudeles, venti, niminmque parati 

flaminaque in lacrimas officiosa meas. 
dextera crudelis, quae me fratremque necavit, 115 

et data poscenti, nomen inane, fides ! 

1 planxit Bent.: stravit PG 2 Plan.: texit G l Meri. : 
pressit s Sedl. : tinxit w Burnt. 

a Androgeos, Ariadne's brother, was accidentally killed at 
Athens. 

128 



THE HERO IDES X 



Minos, whose mother the child of Phoebus, and who 
— what memory holds more close — was promised 
bride to you ! When I have looked on the sea, and 
on the land, and on the wide-stretching shore, 1 
know many dangers threaten me on land, and 
many on the waters. The sky remains — yet there I 
fear visions of the gods ! I am left helpless, a prey 
to the maws of ravening beasts ; and if men dwell in 
the place and keep it, I put no trust in them — my 
hurts have taught me fear of stranger-men. 

99 O, that Androgeos were still alive, and that 
thou, O Cecropian land, hadst not been made to 
atone for thy impious deeds with the doom of thy 
children ! " and would that thy upraised right hand, 
O Theseus, had not slain with knotty club him 
that was man in part, and in part bull ; and 1 had 
not given thee the thread to show the way of thy 
return — thread oft caught up again and passed 
through the hands led on by it. I marvel not— ah, 
no! — if victory was thine, and the monster smote 
with his length the Cretan earth. His horn could not 
have pierced that iron heart of thine ; thy breast 
was safe, even didst thou naught to shield thy- 
self. There barest thou Hint, there barest thou 
adamant ; there hast thou a Theseus harder than 
any flint ! 

111 Ah, cruel slumbers, why did you hold me 
thus inert ? Or, better had I been weighed down 
once for all by everlasting night. You, too, were 
cruel, O winds, and all too well prepared, and you 
breezes, eager to start my tears. Cruel the right 
hand that has brought me and my brother to our 
death, and cruel the pledge— an empty word — that 
you gave at my demand ! Against me conspiring 

i 29 



OVID 



in me iurarunt somnus ventusque fidesque ; 

prodita sum causis una puella tribus ! 
Ergo ego nec lacrimas matris moritura videbo, 

nec, mea qui digitis lumina condat, erit? 120 
spiritus infelix peregrinas ibit in auras, 

nec positos artus unguet arnica manus ? 
ossa superstabunt volucres inhumata marinae ? 

haec sunt officiis digna sepulcra meis ? 
ibis Cecropios portus patriaque reeeptus, 125 

cum steteris turbae 1 celsus in ore 2 tuae 
et bene narraris letum taurique virique 

sectaque per dubias saxea tecta vias, 
me quoque narrato sola tellure relictam ! 

non ego sum titulis subripienda tuis. 130 
nec pater est Aegeus, nec tu Pittheidos Aethrae 

filius ; auctores saxa fretumque tiii ! 3 
Di facerent, ut me summa de ])ii])pe videres ; 

movisset vultus maesta figura tuos ! 
nunc quoque non oculis, sed^ qua potes, adspice 
mcnte ] 35 

liaerentem seopulo, quern vaga pulsat aqua, 
adspice demissos lugentis more capillos 

et tunicas lacrimis sicut ab imbre gravis, 
corpus, ut inpulsae segetes aquilonibus, horret, 

litteraque articulo pressa tremente labat. 140 
non te per meritum, quoniam male cessit, adoro ; 

debita sit facto gratia nulla meo. 
sed ne poena quidem ! si non ego causa salutis, 

non tamen est, cur sis tu mihi causa necis. 

1 turbae G'cu : turbes P 3 : urbis P 2 s : urbes P v 

2 in ore G 1 Jalin Merle. Ehw. : in aure P\ : in arce P 2 V s : 
urbis . . . arce Pa. 

3 vv. 131, 132 after 110 Dirt Ehw. 

130 



THE HEROIDES X 



were slumber, wind, and treaeherous pledge — treason 
three-fold against one maid ! 

119 Am I, then, to die, and, dying, not behold my 
mother's tears ; and shall there be no one's finger to 
close my eyes ? Is my unhappy soul to go forth into 
stranger-air, and no friendly hand compose my 
limbs and drop on them the unguent due ? Are my 
bones to lie unburied, the prey of hovering birds of 
the shore ? Is this the entombment due to me for 
my kindnesses? You will go to the haven of 
Ccerops ; but when you have been received back 
home, and have stood in pride before your throng- 
ing followers, gloriously telling the death of the 
nian-and-bull, and of the halls of rock cut out in 
winding ways, tell, too, of me, abandoned on a solitary 
shore — for I must not be stolen from the record of 
your honours ! Neither is Aegeus your father, nor 
are you the son of Pittheus' daughter Aethra ; they 
who begot you were the rocks and the deep ! 

133 Ah, I eould pray the gods that you had seen me 
from the high stern ; my sad figure had moved your 
heart ! Yet look upon me now — not with eyes, for with 
them you cannot, but with your mind — clinging to a 
rock all beaten by the ■wandering wave. Look upon 
my locks, let loose like those of one in grief for the 
dead, and on my robes, heavy with tears as if with 
rain. My body is a-quiver like standing corn struck 
by the northern blast, and the letters I am tracing 
falter beneath my trembling hand. 'Tis not for my 
desert — for that has come to naught — that I entreat 
you now; let no favour be due for my service. Yet 
neither let me suffer for it! If I ain not the cause 
of your deliverance, yet neither is it right that you 
should cause my death. 



x 3* 

K 2 



OVID 



Has tibi plangendo lugubria pectora lassas 145 
infelix tendo trans freta longa manus ; 

hos tibi — qui superant — ostendo maesta capillos ! 
per lacrimas ovo, quas tua facta movent — 150 

flecte ratem, Theseu, versoque relabere vento ! 
si prius occidero, tu tamen ossa feres ! 



XI 

Canace Macareo 

Siqua tarnen caeeis errabunt scripta lituriSj 

oblitus a dominae eaede libellus erit. 
dextra tenet ealamurn, strictum tenet altera ferrum, 

et iacet in gremio charta soluta men. 
haec est Aeolidos fratri scribentis imago ; 5 

sic videor duro posse placere patri. 
Ipse necis cuperem nostrae spectator adesset, 

anctorisque oculis exigeretur opus ! 
ut ferus est multoque suis trueulentior Euris, 

spectasset siccis vulnera nostra genis. 10 
scilicet est aliquid, cum saevis vivere ventis ; 

ingenio populi convenit ille sui. 
ille Noto Zephyroque et Sithonio Aquiloni 

imperat et pinnis, Eure proterve, tuis. 
imperat lieu ! ventis, tumidae non imperat irae, 15 

possidet et vitiis regna minora suis. 
132 



THE HERO IDES XI 



145 These hands, wearied with heating of my 
sorrowful breast, unhapp}' I stretch toward you over 
the long seas ; these locks — such as remain — in grief 
I bid you look upon ! By these tears I pray you — 
tears moved by what you have done — turn about 
your ship, reverse your sail, glide swiftly back to 
me ! If I have died before you come, 'twill yet 
be you who bear away my bones ! 



XI 

Canace to Macaheus 

If aught of what I write is yet blotted deep and 
escapes your eye, 'twill be because the little roll 
lias been stained by its mistress' blood. My 
right hand holds the pen, a drawn blade the other 
holds, and the paper lies unrolled in my lap. This 
is the picture of Aeolus' daughter writing to her 
brother ; in this guise, it seems, I may please my 
hard -hearted sire. 

7 I would he himself were here to view my end, 
and the deed were done before the eyes of him 
who orders it ! Fierce as he is, far harsher than his 
own east-winds, he would look dry-eyed upon my 
wounds. Surely, something comes from a life with 
savage winds ; his temper is like that of his subjects. 
It is Notus, and Zephyrus, and Sithonian Aquilo, 
over whom he rules, and over thy pinions, wanton 
Eurus. He rules the winds, alas ! but his swelling 
wrath he does not rule, and the realms of his 
possession are less wide than his faults. Of what 



r 33 



OVID 

quid iuvat admotam per avorum noinina caelo 

inter cognatos posse referre Iovem ? 
mira minus infestum, funebria munera, ferrum 

feminea teneo, non mea tela, raanu ? 20 
O utinam, Macareu, quae nos eommisit in ununi, 

venisset leto serior hora meo ! 
cur umquam plus me, frater, quani frater amasti, 

et tibi, non debet quod soror esse, fui ? 
ipsa quoque inealui, qualemque audire solebani, 25 

nescio quern sensi corde tepente deum. 
fugerat ore color ; macies adduxerat artus ; 

sumebant minimos ora coacta cibos ; 
nec somni faciles et nox erat annua nobis, 

et gemitum nullo laesa dolore dabam. 30 
nec, cur haec facerem, poteram mihi reddere causam 

nec noram, quid amans esset ; at illud eram, 
Prima malum nutrix animo praesensit anili ; 

prima mihi nutrix " Aeoli," dixit, " amas ! " 
eiiibui, gremioque pudor deiecit ocellos ; 35 

haec satis in tacita signa fatentis erant. 
iamque tumescebant vitiati pondera ventris, 

aegraque furtivum membra gravabat onus, 
quas mihi non herbas, quae non medicamina nutrix 

attulit audaci supposuitque manu, 40 
ut penitus nostris — hoc te celavimus uuum — 

visceribus crescens excuteretur onus ! 
a, nimium vivax admotis restitit infans 

artibus et tecto tutus ab hoste fuit ! 

!34 



THE HERO IDES XI 



avail for me through my grandsires' names to reach 
even to the skies., to be able to number Jove among 
my kin ? Is there less deadliness in the blade — my 
funeral gift ! — that I hold in my woman's hand, 
weapon not meet for me ? 

21 Ah, Maeareus, would that the hour that made 
us two as one had come after my death ! Oh why, 
my brother, did you ever love me more than brother, 
and why have I been to you what a sister should not 
be ? I, too, was inflamed by love ; I felt some god 
in my glowing heart, and knew him from what I used 
to hear he was. My eolour had fled from my face ; 
wasting had shrunk my frame ; I scarce took food, 
and with unwilling mouth ; my sleep was never 
easy, the night was a year for me, and I groaned, 
though stricken with no pain. Nor could I render 
myself a reason why I did these things ; I did 
not know what it was to be in love — yet in love 
I was. 

33 The first to perceive my trouble, in her old 
wife's way, was my nurse ; she first, my nurse, said : 
" Daughter of Aeolus, thou art in love ! " 1 blushed, 
and shame bent down my eyes into my bosom ; 
I said no word, but this was sign enough that I 
confessed. And presently there grew apaee the 
burden of my wayward bosom, and my weakened 
frame felt the weight of its seeret load. What herbs 
and what medicines did my nurse not bring to me, 
applying them with bold hand to drive forth entirely 
from my bosom — this was the only secret we kept 
from you — the burden that was increasing there ! 
Ah, too full of life, the little thing withstood the arts 
employed against it, and was kept safe from its 
hidden foe ! 



135 



OVID 



lam noviens erat orta soror pulcherrima Phocbi, 45 

denaque 1 luciferos Luna move bat equos. 
nescia, quae faceret subitos mihi causa dolores, 

et rudis ad partus et nova miles eram. 
nec tenui vocem. " quid/' ait, " tua crimina prodis ? " 

oraque clamantis conscia pressit anus. 50 
quid faciam infelix ? gemitus dolor edere cogit, 

sed timor et nutrix et pudor ipse vetant. 
contineo gemitus elapsaque verba reprendo 

et cogor lacrimas conbibere ipsa meas. 
mors erat ante oculos, et opem Lueina negabat — 55 

et grave, si morerer, mors quoque crimen erat — 
cum super incnmbens scissa tunicaque comaque 

pressa refovisti pectora nostra tuis, 
et mihi ' c vive, soror, soror o carissima/' aisti ; 

" vive nec unius corpore perde duos ! 60 
spes bona (let vires ; fratri nam nupta futura es. 2 

illius, de quo mater, et uxor eris." 
Mortua, crede mihi, tamen ad tua verba revixi : 

et positum est uteri crimen onusque mei. 
quid tibi grataris ? media sedet Aeolus aula ; 65 

crimina sunt oculis subripienda patris. 
frugibus 3 infantem ramisque albentis olivae 

et levibus vittis sedula celat anus, 
fictaque sacra facit dicitque precantia verba ; 

dat populus sacris, dat pater ipse viam. 70 
iam prope limen erat — patrias vagitus ad auris 

venit, et indicio proditur ille suo ! 

1 nonaque P s Ehu\ : denaque others : pronaque Bent. 

2 So GaiMerl:: fratri es nam nuptura £ 2 : fratris nam 
nupta futura es Pa.: germano nupta futura es Ehw. 

3 fragibus P : frondibus G V Plan. 

136 



THE HEROIDES XI 



45 And now for the ninth time had Phoebus' 
fairest sister risen, and for the tenth time the 
moon was driving on her light-hearing steeds. 1 
knew not what caused the sudden pangs in me ; 
to travail I was unused, a soldier new to the service. 
I could not keep from groans. " Why betray thy 
fault?" said the ancient dame who knew my 
secret, and stopped my erying lips. What shall 1 
do, unhappy that I am ? The pains compel my groans, 
but fear, the nurse, and shame itself forbid. I repress 
my groans, and try to take baek the words that slip 
from me, and foree myself to drink my very tears. 
Death was before my eyes ; and Lucina denied 
her aid — death, too, were I to die, would fasten upon 
me heavy guilt — when leaning over me, you tore 
my robe and my hair away, and wanned my bosom 
back to life with the pressure of your own, and said : 
"Live, sister, sister O most dear; live, and do not 
be the death of two beings in one ! Let good hope 
give thee strength ; for now thou shalt be thy 
brother's bride. He who made thee mother will 
also make thee wife." 

03 Dead that I am, believe me, yet at your words 
I live again, and have brought forth the reproach 
and burden of my womb. But why rejoice? In the 
midst of the palaee hall sits Aeolus ; the sign of my 
fault must be removed from my father's eyes. With 
fruits and whitening olive-branches, and with light 
fillets, the careful dame attempts to hide the babe, 
and makes pretence of sacrifice, and utters words of 
prayer ; the people give way to let her pass, my father 
himself gives way.. She is already near the threshold 
— my father's ears have caught the crying sound, and 
the babe is lost, betrayed by his own sign ! Aeolus 

*37 



OVID 



eri])it infantem mentitaque sacra revelat 

Aeolus ; insana regia voce sonat. 
ut mare fit tremulum, tenui cum stringitur aura, 75 

ut quatitur tepido fraxina virga 1 Noto, 
sic mea vibrari pallentia membra videres ; 

quassus ab inposito corpore lectus erat, 
inruit et nostrum vnlgat clamore pudorem, 

et vix a misero continet ore manus. SO 
ipsa nihil praeter lacrimas pudibunda profudi ; 

torpuerat gelido lingua retenta metu. 
Iamque dari parvum canibusque avibusque nepotem 

iusserat 4 in solis destituique locis. 
vagitus dedit ille miser — sensisse putares — 85 

quaque suum poterat voce rogabat avum. 
quid mihi tunc animi credis, germane, fuisse — 

nam potes ex animo colligere ipse tuo — 
cum mea me coram silvas inimicus in altas 

viscera montanis ferret edenda lupis ? 90 
exierat thalamo ; tunc demum pectora plangi 

contigit inqne meas unguibus ire genas. 
Interea patrius vultu maerente satelles 

venit et indignos edidit ore sonos : 
"Aeolus hunc ensem mittit tibi " — tradidit 

ensem — 95 

" et iubet ex men to scire, quid iste velit." 
scimus, et utemur violento fortiter ense ; 

pectoribus condam dona paterna meis. 
his mea muneribus, genitor, conubia donas ? 

hac tua dote, pater, filia dives erit ? 100 

1 The usual JfSS. reading : fraxincies virga P : fraxinus 
icta Pa. 

138 



THE HEROIDES XI 



catches up the child and reveals the pretended sacri- 
fice ; the whole palaee resounds with his maddened 
cries. As the sea is set a-trembling when a light 
breeze passes o'er, as the ashen braneh is shaken 
by the tepid breeze. from the south, so might you 
have seen my blanehing members quiver; the 
couch was a-quake with the body that lay upon it. 
He rushes in and with cries makes known my shame 
to all, and scarce restrains his hand from my wretched 
face. Myself in my confusion did naught but pour 
forth tears ; my tongue had grown dumb with the icy 
ehill of fear. 

83 And now he had ordered his little grandchild 
thrown to the dogs and birds, to be abandoned in 
some solitary place. The hapless babe broke forth 
in waitings — you would have thought he understood 
— and with what utterance he could entreated his 
grandsire. What heart do yon think was mine then, 
O my brother — for you can judge from your own — 
when the enemy before my eyes bore away to the 
deep forests the fruit of my bosom to be devoured 
by mountain wolves ? My father had gone out of 
my chamber; then at length could I beat my breasts 
and furrow my cheeks with the nail. 

93 Meanwhile with sorrowful air eamc one of my 
father's guards, and pronounced these shameful 
words : " Aeolus sends this sword to you " — he 
handed me the sword — "and bids you know from 
your desert what it may mean." I do know, and 
shall bravely make use of the violent blade ; 1 shall 
bury in my breast my father's gift. Is it presents 
like this, O my sire, you give me on my marriage? 
With this dowry from you, O father, shall your 
daughter be made rich ? Take away afar, deluded 



139 



OVID 



tolle procul, decepte, faces, Hymenaee, maritas 

et fuge turbato tecta nefanda pede ! 
ferte faces in me quas fertis, Erinyes atrae, 

et meus ex isto lueeat igne rogus ! 
nubite felices Parea meliore sorores, 105 

amissae memores sed tamen este mei ! 
Quid puer adraisit tarn paucis editus horis ? 

quo laesit facto vix bene natus avum ? 
si potuit meruisse neceui, meruisse putetur — 

a, miser admisso plectitur ille meo ! 110 
nate, dolor matris, rapidarum 1 praeda feraruin, 

ei mihi ! natali dilacerate tuo ; 
nate, parum fausti miserabile pigmis amoris — 

haec tibi prima dies, haec tibi summa fuit. 
non mihi te licuit lacrirnis perfundere iustis, 115 

in tua non tonsas ferre sepulcra comas ; 
non super incubui, non oscula frigida carpsi. 

diripinnt avidae viscera nostra fei'ae. 
Ij)sa qnoque infantis cum vulnere prosequar umbras 

nec mater fuero dicta nec orba diu. 1 20 

tu tamen, o frustra miserae sperate soi*ori, 

sparsa, preeor, nati collige membra tui, 
et refer ad matrem socioque inpone sepulcro, 

urnaque nos babeat quamlibet arta duos ! 
vive memor nostri, lacrimasque in vulnera funde, 125 

neve reformida corpus amantis amans. 
tu, rogo, 2 dilectae nimium mandata sororis 

perfer ; mandatum persequar ipsa patris ! 

1 rabidarum s Bent. 

2 tura rogo placitae . . . tu fer Pa. 

140 



THE HEROIDES XI 



Hymenaeus, thy wedding-torches, and fly with 
frightened foot- from these nefarious halls ! Bring 
for me the torches ye bear, Erinyes dark, and let 
my funeral pyre blaze bright from the fires ye 
give ! Wed happily under a better fate, O my 
sisters, but yet remember me though lost ! 

107 What crime could the babe commit, with so few 
hours of life ? With what act could he, scarce born, 
do harm to his grandsire ? If it could be he deserved 
his death, let it be judged he did — ah, wretched 
child, it is my fault he surfers for ! O my son, grief 
of thy mother, prey of the ravening beasts, ah me ! 
torn limb from limb on thy day of birth ; O my son, 
miserable pledge of my unhallowed love — this was 
the first of days for thee, and this for thee the last. 
Fate did not permit me to shed o'er thee the tears 
I owed, nor to bear to thy tomb the shorn lock ; 
I have not bent o'er thee, nor culled the kiss from 
thy cold lips. Greedy wild beasts are rending in 
pieces the child my womb put forth. 

119 I, too, shall follow the shades of my babe — 
shall deal myself the stroke — and shall not long 
have been called or mother or bereaved. Do thou, 
nevertheless, O hoped for in vain by thy wretched 
sister, collect, I entreat, the scattered members of 
thy son, and bring them again to their mother to 
share her sepulchre, and let one urn, however scant, 
possess us both ! O live, and forget me not ; pour 
forth thy tears upon my wounds, nor shrink from 
her thou once didst love, and who loved thee ! 
Do thou, I pray, fulfil the behests of the sister thou 
didst love too well ; the behest of my father I 
shall myself perform ! 



141 



OVID 



XII 

Medea Iasoxi 

At tibi Colchorum, memini, regina vacavi, 

ars mea cum peteres ut tibi ferret opem. 
tunc quae dispensant mortalia fata 1 sorores 

debuerant fusos evoluisse meos. 
turn potui Medea mori bene ! quidquid ab illo 5 

produsi vitam 3 tempore, poena fuit. 
Ei mini ! cur umquam iuvenalibus acta lacertis 

Phrixeam petiit Pelias arbor ovem ? 
cur umquam Colchi Magnetida vidimus Argon, 

turbaque Phasiacam Graia bibistis aquam ? 10 
cur mini plus aequo flavi placuere capilli 

et decor et linguae gratia ficta tuae ? 
aut, semel in nostras quoniam nova puppis harenas 

venerat audacis attuleratque viros, 
isset anhelatos non praemedicatus in ignes 15 

inmemor Aesonides oi*aque adusta bourn ; 
semina iecisset, 3 totidemque et 4 semina et hostes, 

ut caderet cultu cultor ab ipse suo ! 
quantum perfidiae tecum, scelerate, perisset, 

dempta forent capiti quam mala multa meo ! 20 

1 fata G to : facta P : fila s Hein. Pa. 2 vitae o. 

3 iecisset P G : seusisset s : serisset Hein. Merle. Pa. 

4 totidemque et P : totidem quod G : quot Pa. 

a Medea begins suddenly, as if in answer to a refusal of 
Jason to listen to her plea. 

Euripides wrote a Medea, and was followed by Ennius, 



THE HER01DES Xll 



XII 

Medea to Jason 

And yet* 7 for you, I remember, I the queen of 
Colchis could find time, when yon besought that 
my art might bring you help. Then was the time 
when the sisters who pa}' out the fated thread of 
mortal life should have unwound for aye my spindle. 
Then could Medea have ended well ! Whatever of 
life has been lengthened out for me from that time 
forth has been but punishment. 

7 Ah me ! why was the ship from the forests of 
Pelion ever driven over the seas by strong young 
arms in quest of the ram of Phrixus ? b Why did 
we Col ch inns ever cast eye upon Magnesian Argo, 
and why did your Greek crew ever drink of the 
waters of the Phasis ? Why did I too greatly delight 
in those golden locks of yours, in your comely ways, 
and in the false graces of your tongue? Yet delight 
too greatly I did — else, when once the strange craft 
had been beached upon our sands and brought us 
her bold crew, all unanointed would the unremeinber- 
ing son of Aeson have gone forth to meet the fires 
exhaled from the flame-scorched nostrils of the bulls ; 
he would have scattered the seeds — as many as the 
seeds were the enemy, too — for the sower himself 
to fall in strife with his own sowing ! How much 
perfidy, vile wretch, would have perished with you, 
and how many woes been averted from my head ! 

Accius, and Ovid himself, whose play is lost, and Seneca. 
In this letter Ovid draws from Euripides and Apollonius 
Khodius, Aryonautica III and IV. 6 See Index. 

M3 



OVID 



Est aliqua ingrato meritum exprobrare voluptas. 

hac fruar ; liaec de te gaudia sola feram. 
iussus inexpertam Colchos advertere ]>u])pim 

intrasti patriae regna beata meae. 
hoc illic Medea fuij nova nupta quod hie est ; 25 

quam pater est illi, tarn mihi dives erat. 
hie Ephyren bimarem, Scythia tenus ille nivosa 

omne tenet, Ponti qua plaga Iaeva iacet. 
Accipit hospitio iuvenes Aeeta Pelasgos, 

et premitis pictos, corpora Graia, toros. 30 
tunc ego te vidi, tunc coepi scire, quis esses ; 

ilia fuit mentis prima ruhia meae. 
et vidi et ])erii ; nec notis ignibus arsi, 

ardet ut ad magnos ]>inea taeda deos. 
et formosus eras, et me mea fata trahebant ; 35 

abstulerant ocidi lumina nostra tui. 
perfide, sensisti — quis enim bene celat amorem ? 

eminet indicio prodita flamma suo. 
Dicitur interea tibi lex ut dura ferorum 

insolito premeres vomere colla bourn. 40 
Martis erant tauri plus quam per cornua saevi, 

quorum terribilis spiritus ignis erat ; 
aere pedes solidi praetentaque naribus aera, 

nigra per adflatus haec quoque facta suos. 
semina praeterea populos genitura iuberis 45 

spargere devota lata per arva manu, 
qui peterent natis secum tua corpora telis ; 

ilia est agricolae messis iniqua suo. 

" Corinth. 

H4 



THE HEROIDES XII 



21 'Tis sonic . pleasure to reproach the ungrateful 
with favours done. That pleasure 1 will enjoy ; that 
is the only delight 1 shall win from you. Bidden to 
turn the hitherto untried eraft to the shores of 
Colchis, you set foot in the rich realms of my native 
land. There I, Medea, was what here your new 
bride is ; as rich as her sire is, so rich was mine. 
Hers holds Ephyre/ 4 washed by two seas ; mine, 
all the country which lies along the left strand 
of the Pontus e'en to the snows of Seytlria. 

29 Aeetes welcomes to his home the Pelasgian youths, 
and you rest your Greek limbs upon the pictured 
couch. Then 'twas that I saw you, then began to 
know you ; that was the first impulse to the downfall 
of my soul. I saw you, and I was undone ; nor did I 
kindle with ordinary fires, but like the pine-torch 
kindled before the mighty gods. Not only were 
you noble to look upon, but my fates were dragging 
me to doom ; your eyes had robbed mine of their 
power to see. Traitor, you saw it — for who can 
well hide love ? Its Hame shines forth its own 
betrayer. 

39 Meanwhile the condition is imposed that yon 
press the hard necks of the fierce bulls at the 
unaccustomed plow. To Mars the bulls belonged, 
raging with more than mere horns, for their breath- 
ing was of terrible fire ; of solid bronze were their 
feet, wrought round with bronze their nostrils, made 
black, too, by the blasts of their own breath. 
Besides this, you are bidden to scatter with 
obedient hand over the wide fields the seeds that 
should beget peoples to assail you with weapons 
born with themselves ; a baneful harvest, that, to its 
own husbandman. The eyes of the guardian that 



M5 



OVID 



lumina custodis succumbere nescia somno, 

ultimus est aliqua decipere arte labor. 50 
Dixerat Aeetes ; maesti consurgitis omnes, 

mensaque purpureas deserit alta toros. 
quam tibi tunc longe regnum dotale Creusae 

et socer et magni nata Creontis erat ? 
tristis abis ; oculis abeuntem prosequor udis, 55 

et dixit tenui murmure lingua : "vale ! " 
ut positum tetigi thalamo male saucia lectum, 

acta est per lacrimas nox mihi, quanta fuit ; 
ante oculos taurique meos segetesque nefandae, 

ante meos oculos pervigil anguis erat. 60 
hine amor, hinc timor est; ipstim timor auget 
amorem. 

mane erat, et thalamo eara recepta sorur 
disiectamque comas adversaque 1 in ora iacentem 

invenit, et laerimis omnia plena meis. 
orat opem Minyis. alter petit, alter habebit ; 2 65 

Aesonio iuveni quod rogat ilia, danms. 
Est neraus et piceis et frondibus ilieis atrum ; 

vix illuc radiis solis adire licet, 
sunt in eo — fuerant certe — delubra Dianae ; 

aurea barbarica stat dea facta manu. 70 
noscis ? an exciderunt mecum loca? venimus illuc. 

orsus es infido sic prior ore loqui : 
f<r ius tibi et arbitrium nostrae fortuna salutis 

tradidit, inque tua est vitaque morsque manu. 

1 adversaque P G w Merk Ehw.: aversaque V s Burnt. Sedl. 

2 So Po Sedl.: petit altera et altera habebit P 2 G s Burin.'. 
petit altera et altera habebat wJahti. 

a Chalciope. 

146 



THE HEROIDES XII 



know not yielding to sleep — by some art to elude 
them is your final task. 

51 Aeetes had spoken ; in gloom you all rise up, 
and the high table is removed from the purple-spread 
couches. How far away then from your thought 
were Creusa's dowry-realm, and the daughter of 
great Creon, and Creon the father of your bride ! 
With foreboding you depart ; and as you go my 
moist eyes follow you, and in faint murmur comes 
from my tongue : " Fare thou well ! " Laying 
myself on the ordered couch within my chamber, 
grievously wounded, in tears 1 passed the whole 
night long ; before my eyes appeared the bulls and 
the dreadful harvest, before my eyes the un- 
sleeping serpent. On the one hand was love, on 
the other, fear ; and fear increased my very love. 
Morning came, and my dear sister/ 1 admitted to my 
chamber, found me with loosened hair and lying 
prone upon my face, and everywhere my tears. 
She implores aid for your Minyac. What one asks, 
another is to receive ; what she petitions for the 
Aesonian youth, I grant. 

07 There is a grove, sombre with pine-trees and 
the fronds of the ilex ; into it scarce can the rays of 
the sun find way. There is in it — there was, at 
least — a shrine to Diana, wherein stands the goddess, 
a golden image fashioned by barbaric hand. Do 
you know the place ? or have places fallen from your 
mind along with me ? We came to the spot. You 
were the first to speak, with those faithless lips, 
and these were your words: "To thy hand fortune 
has committed the right of choosing or not my 
deliverance, and in thy hand are the ways of 
life and death for me. To have power to ruin 



147 

l 2 



OVID 



perdere posse sat est, siquem iuvet ipsa potestas ; 75 

sed tibi servatus gloria maior ero. 
per mala nostra precoiv, quorum potes esse levamen, 

per genus, et numen cuncta videntis avi, 
]>er triplicis vultus arcanaque sacra Dianae, 

et si forte aliquos gens habet ista deos — 80 
o virgo, miserere mei, miserere meorum ; 

effice me mentis tempus in omne tuum ! 
quodsi forte yirum non dedignare Pelasgum — 

sed mihi tarn faciles unde meosque deos ? — 
spiritus ante mens tenues vanescat in auras 85 

quam thalamo nisi tu nupta sit utla meo ! 
conscia sit Iuno sacris praefecta mantis, 

et dea marmorea cuius in aede sumus ! " 
Haec animum — et quota pars haec sunt ! — movere 
puellae 

simpliciSj et dextrae dextera iuncta meae. 90 
vidi etiam lacrimas — an pars est fraudis 1 in illis ? 

sic cito sum verbis capta puella tuis. 
iungis et aeripedes inadusto corpore tauros 

et solidam iusso vomere findis hunium. 
arva venenatis pro semine dentibus inples ; 95 

nascitur et gladios scutaque miles habet. 
ipsa ego, quae dederam medicamina, pallida sedi, 

cum vidi subitos arma tenere viros ; 
donee terrigenae, facinus mirabile, fratres 

inter se strictas conseruere manus. 100 

1 a! pars est L. Mueller : an et ars est Sedl.: an et est pars 
some of the early editions. 

148 



THE HEROIDES XII 



is enough, if anyone delight in power for itself ; 
but to save me will be greater, glory. By our 
misfortunes, which thou hast power to relieve, I 
pray, by thy line, and by the godhead of thy all- 
seeing grandsire the sun, by the three-fold face 
and holy mysteries of Diana, and by the gods 
of that race of thine — if so be gods it have — by all 
these, O maiden, have pity upon ine, have pity on 
my men ; be kind to me and make me thine for 
ever ! And if it chance thou dost not disdain a 
Pelasgian suitor — but how can I hope the gods Avill 
be so facile to my wish ? — may my spirit vanish 
away into thin air before another than thou shall 
come a bride to my chamber ! My witness be Juno, 
ward of the rites of wedlock, and the goddess in 
whose marble shrine we stand ! " 

89 Words like these — and how slight a part of them 
is here ! — and your right hand clasped with mine, 
moved the heart of the simple 'maid. I saw even 
tears — or was there in the tears, too, part of your 
deceit ? Thus quickly was I ensnared, girl that I 
was, by your words. You yoke together the bronze- 
footed bulls with your body unharmed by their fire, 
and cleave the solid mould with the share, as you 
were bid. The ploughed fields you sow full with 
envenomed teeth in place of seed ; and there rises 
out of the earth, with sword and shield, a warrior 
band. Myself, the giver of the charmed drug, sat 
pallid there at sight of* men all suddenly arisen 
and in arms ; until the earth-born brothers — O deed 
most wonderful ! — drew arms and came to the 
grapple each with each. 

149 



OVID 



Insopor ecce vigil 3 squamis crepitantibus horrens 

sibilat et torto pectore verrit humum ! 
dotis opes ubi erant ? ubi erat tibi regia coniunx, 

quique maris genii ni distinet Isthmos aquas ? 
ilia ego, quae tibi sum nunc denique barbara 
facta, 105 

nunc tibi sum pauper, nunc tibi visa nocens, 
flammea subduxi medicato lumina somno, 

et tibi, quae raperes, vellera tuta dedi. 
proditus est genitor, regmun patriamque reliqui ; 

munus, in exilio quod licet esse, tub ! 110 
virginitas facta est peregrini praeda latronis ; 

optima cum cara matre relicta soror. 
At non te fugiens sine me, germane, reliqui ! 

deficit hoe uno littera nostra loco, 
quod faeere ausa mea est, ncn audet scribere 

dextra. 115 

sic ego, sed tecum, dilaceranda fui. 
nec tamen extimui — quid enim post ilia timerem ? — 

credere me pelago, femina iamque nocens. 
numen ubi est ? ubi di ? meritas subeamus in alto, 

tu fraudis poenas, credulitatis ego ! 1 20 

Compressos utinam Symplegades elisissent, 

nostraque adhaererent ossibus ossa tuis ; 
aut nos Scylla rapax canibus mersisset 2 edendos — 

debuit ingrafts Scylla nocere viris ; 
quaeque vomit totidem fluctus totidemque resor- 

bet, 125 

nos quoque Trinacriae supposuisset aquae ! 

1 So P x (7, Merh.: Pervigil ecce draco P., &> Burnt.: insuper 
ecce vigil Hein.: insopor ecce draco Pa. 

2 mersisset Pa.: misisset MSS. 



a The dismemberment of her brother Absyrtus. 



THE HERO IDES XII 



101 Then, lo and behold ! all a-bristle with rattling 
scales, comes the unsleeping sentinel, hissing and 
sweeping the ground with winding belly. Where 
then was your rich dowry ? Where then your royal 
consort, and the Isthmus that sunders the waters of 
two seas ? I, the maiden who am now at last 
become a barbarian in your eyes, who now am poor, 
who now seem baneful — I closed the lids of the 
flame-like eyes in slumber wrought by my drug, and 
gave into your hand the fleece to steal away un- 
harmed. I betrayed my sire, 1 left my throne and 
my native soil ; the reward I get is leave to live in 
exile ! My maidenly innocence has become the spoil 
of a pirate from overseas ; beloved mother and best 
of sisters I have left behind. 

113 But thee, O my brother, I did not leave behind 
as I fled ! In this one plaee my pen fails. Of the 
deed my right hand was bold enough to do," it is 
not bold enough to write. So I, too, should have 
been torn limb from limb — but with thee ! And yet 
I did not fear — for what, after that, could I fear? — 
to trust myself to the sea, woman though I was, and 
now with guilt upon me. Where is heavenly justice ? 
Where the gods? Let the penalty that is our due 
overtake us on the dee]) — you for your treachery, 
me for my trustfulness ! 

121 Would the Symplegades had caught and 
crushed us out together, and that my bones were 
clinging now to yours; or Seylla the ravening sub- 
merged us in the deep to be devoured by her dogs 
— fit were it for Seylla to work woe to ingrate men ! 
And she who spews forth so many times the floods, 
and sucks them so many times back in again — would 
she had brought us, too, beneath the Trinacrian 

151 



OVID 



sospes ad Haemonias victorque reverteris urbes ; 

ponitur ad patrios aurea lana deos. 
Quid referam Peliae natas pietate nocentes 

caesaque virginea membra paterna manu ? 130 
ut culpent alii_, tibi me laudare necesse est, 

pro quo sum totiens esse coacta nocens. 
ausus es — o, iusto desunt sua verba dolori ! — 

ausus es " Aesonia," dicere, " cede domo ! " 
iussa domo cessi natis comitata duobus 135 

et, qui me sequitur semper, amore tui. 
ut subito nostras Hymen cantatus ad aures 

venit, et accenso lampades igne micant, 
tibiaque efFundit socialia carmina vobis, 

at mihi funerea flebiliora tuba, 140 
pertimui, nec adhuc tantum scelus esse putabam ; 

sed tamen in toto pectore frigus erat. 
turba ruunt et " Hymen/' clamant, iC Hymenaee ! " 
frequenter — 

quo propior vox haec, hoc mihi peius erat. 
diversi flebant servi lacrimasque tegebant — 145 

quis vellet tanti nuntius esse mali ? 
me quoque, quidquid erat, potius nescire iuvabat ; 

sed tamquam scirem, mens mea tristis erat, 
cum minor e pueris iussus 1 studioque videndi 

constitit ad geminae limina prima foris. 150 
" hinc" 2 mihi iC mater, abi ! 3 pompam pater," 
inquit, " Iason 

ducit et aditmctos aureus urget equos ! " 

1 iussus PG Plan.: lassus Pa. 

2 hie s Hein. 3 abi P : adi Ehw. 

a At the persuasion of Medea, who wished to avenge Jasou, 
the}' attempted the rejuvenation of their father by dis- 
membering and boiling him in a supposed magic cauldron. 

6 Thej' were still in the palace. Palmer, who reads lassus 
and abi, pictures Medea and her son in the street. 
152 



THE HERO IDES XII 



wave ! Vet unharmed and victorious you return to 
Haemonia's towns, and the golden fleece is laid 
before your fathers' gods. 

129 Why rehearse the tale of Pelias' daughters, by 
devotion led to evil deeds — of how their maiden 
hands laid knife to the members of their sire ? a 
I may be blamed by others, but you perforce must 
praise me — you, for whom so many times I have 
been driven to crime. Yet yon have dared — O, fit 
words fail me for my righteous wrath ! — you have 
dared to say : " Withdraw from the palace of Aeson's 
line ! " At your bidding I have withdrawn from 
your palace, taking with me our two children, and — 
what follows me evermore — my love for you. When, 
all suddenly, there came to my ears the chant of 
Hymen, and to my eyes the gleam of blazing torches, 
and the pipe poured forth its notes, for you a 
wedding-strain, but for me a strain more tearful than 
the funeral trump, I was filled with fear ; I did not 
yet believe such monstrous guilt could be ; but all 
my breast none the less grew chill. The throng 
pressed eagerly on, crying " Hymen, O Hymen- 
aeus ! " in full chorus — the nearer the cry, for me 
the more dreadful. My slaves turned awav and 
we] it, seeking to hide their tears — who would be 
willing messenger of tidings so ill ? Whatever it 
was, 'twas better, indeed, that 1 not know ; but my 
heart was heavy, as if I really knew, when the 
younger of the children, at my bidding, and eager 
for the sight, went and stood at the outer threshold 
of the double door. ''Here, mother, come out!"'' 
he cries to me. "A procession is coming, and my 
father Jason leading it. He's all in gold, and driving 
a team of horses! '' Then straight 1 rent my cloak 



J 53 



OVID 



protinus abscissa planxi inea pectora veste, 

tuta nec a digitis ora fuere meis. 
ire animus mediae suadebat in agmina turbae 155 

sertaque conpositis demere rapta comis ; 
vix me continui, quin sic laniata ca])illos 

clamarera " meus est!" iniceremque manus. 
Laese pater, gaude ! Colchi gaudete relicti ! 

inferias umbrae fratris habete mei ; 160 
deseror amissis regno patriaque domoque 

coniuge, qui nobis omnia solus erat ! 
serpentis igitur potui taurosque furentes ; 

unum non potui perdomuisse virum, 
quaeque feros pepuli doctis medicatibus ignes, 165 

non valeo flammas effugere ipsa meas. 
ipsi me cantus herbaeque artesque relinquunt ; 

nil dea, nil Hecates sacra potentis agunt. 
non mihi grata dies ; noctes vigilantur amarae, 

et tener a misero pectore somnus abit. 1 170 
quae me non possum, potui sopire draconem ; 

utilior cuivis quam mihi cura mea est. 
quos ego servavi, paelex amplectitur artus, 

et nostri fructus ilia laboris habet. 
Forsitan et, stultae dum te iactare maritae 175 

quaeris et rniustis auribus apta loqui, 
in faciem moresque meos nova crimina fingas. 

rideat et vitiis laeta sit ilia meis ! 
rideat et Tyrio iaceat sublimis in ostro — 

flebit et ardores vincet adusta meos ! ISO 
dum ferrum flammaeque aderunt sucnsque veneni, 

hostis Medeae nullus' inultus erit ! 

1 So Pa.: nec ten//ra inisero pectore somnus habet P : 
nec tener ah miserae pectora somnus habet or alit Hein. 

rt Creusa and her father will realry be consumed in the fire, 
with the palace. 



154 



THE HE HO IDES XII 



and beat my breast and cried aloud, and my cheeks 
were at the mercy of my nails. My heart impelled 
me to rush into the midst of* the moving throng, to 
tear off the wreaths from my ordered locks ; I scarce 
could keep from crying out, thus with hair all torn, 
" He is mine ! " and laying hold on you. 

159 Ah, injured father, rejoice ! Rejoice, ye Col- 
ehians whom I left ! Shades of my brother, receive 
in my fate your sacrifice due ; I am abandoned ; 
I have lost my throne, my native soil, my home, 
my husband — who alone for me took the place of 
all ! Dragons and maddened bulls, it seems, I could 
subdue; a man alone I could not; I, who could 
beat back fierce fire with wise drugs, have not the 
power to escape the flames of my own passion. 
My very incantations, herbs, and arts abandon me ; 
naught does my goddess aid me, naught the sacrifice 
I make to potent Hecate. I take no pleasure in the 
day ; my nights are watches of bitterness, and gentle 
sleep is far departed from my wretched soul. I, who 
could charm the dragon to sleep, can bring none 
to myself; my effort brings more good to any one 
else soever than to me. The limbs I saved, a 
wanton now embraces ; 'tis she who reaps the fruit 
of my toil. 

175 Perhaps, too, when you wish to make boast to 
your stupid mate and say what will pleasure her 
unjust ears, you will fashion strange slanders against 
my face and against my ways. Let her make merry 
and be joyful over my faults ! Let her make merry, 
and lie aloft on the Tynan purple — she shall weep, and 
the flames a that consume her will surpass my own ! 
While sword and fire are at my hand, and the juice 
of poison, no foe of Medea shall go unpunished! 

155 



OVJD 



Quodsi forte preces praecordia ferrea tangunt, 

nunc animis audi verba minora meis ! 
tarn tibi sum supplex, quam tu mihi saepe fuisti, 185 

nec moror ante tuos procubuisse pedes, 
si tibi sum vilis, communis respice natos ; 

saeviet in partus dira noverca meos. 
et nimium similes tibi sunt, et imagine tangor, 

et quotiens video, lumina nostra madent. 190 
per superos oro, per avitae lumina flammae, 

per meritum et natos, pignora nostra, duos — 
redde torum, pro quo tot res insana reliqui ; 

adde fidem dictis auxiliumque refer ! 
non ego te inploro contra taurosque virosque, 195 

utque tua serpens victa quiescat ope ; 
te peto, quern merui, quern nobis ipse dedisti, 

cum quo sum pariter facta parente parens. 
Dos ubi sit, quaeris ? campo numeravimus illo, 

qui tibi laturo vellus arandus erat. 200 
aureus ille aries villo spectabilis alto 

dos mea, quam, dicam si tibi iC redde ! " neges. 
dos mea tu sospes ; dos est mea Graia iuventus ! 

i nunc, Sisyphias, inprobe, confer opes ! 
quod vivis, quod habes nuptam socerumque 

potentis, 205 

hoc ipsum, ingratus quod potes esse, meum est. 
quos equidem actutum — sed quid praedicere poenam 

attinet ? ingentis parturit ira minas. 

I5 6 



THE HEKOIDES XII 



183 But if it chance my entreaties touch a heart 
of iron, list now to my words — words too humble for 
my proud soul ! I am as much a suppliant to you as 
you have often been to me, and I hesitate not to cast 
myself at your feet. If I am cheap in your eyes, be 
kind to our common offspring ; a hard stepdame will 
be cruel to the fruitage of my womb. Their resem- 
blance to you is all too great, and I am touched by 
the likeness ; and as often as I see them, my eyes 
drop tears. By the gods above, by the light of your 
grandsire's beams, by my favours to you, and by the 
two children who are our mutual pledge — restore me 
to the bed for which I madly left so much behind ; 
be faithful to your promises, and come to my aid as 
I came to yours ! I do not implore you to go forth 
against bulls and men, nor ask your aid to quiet 
and overcome a dragon ; it is you I ask for, — you, 
whom I have earned, whom you yourself gave to 
ine, by whom I became a mother, as you bv me a 
father. 

199 Where is my dowry, you ask ? On the field I 
counted it out — that field which you had to plough 
before you could bear away the fleece. The famous 
golden ram, sightly for deep flock, is my dowry — 
the which, should I say to you " Restore it ! " you 
would refuse to render up. My dowry is yourself — 
saved ; my dowry is the band of Grecian youth ! 
Go now, wretch, compare with that your wealth of 
Sisyphus ! That you are alive, that you take to wife 
one who, with the father she brings you, is of kingly 
station, that you have the very power of being 
ingrate — you owe to me. Whom, hark you, I will 
straight — but what boots it to foretell your penalty ? 
My ire is in travail with mighty threats. Whither 

'57 



OVID 



quo feret ira_, sequar ! facti fortasse pigebit — 

et piget infido consuluisse viro. 210 

viderit ista deus, qui nunc mea pectora versat ! 
nescio quid certe mens mea maius agit ! 

XIII 

Laudamia Protesilao. 

Mittit et optat amans, quo mittitur, ire salutem 

Haemonis Haemonio Laudamia 1 viro. 
Aidide te fama est vento retinente morari. 

a, me cum fugeres, hie ubi ventus erat ? 
turn freta debuerant vestris obsistere remis ; 5 

illud erat saevis utile tempus aquis. 
oscula plura viro mandataque plura dedissem ; 

et sunt quae volui dicere multa tibi. 
raptus es hinc praeceps, et qui tua vela vocaret, 

quern cuperent nautae., non ego^ ventus erat; 10 
ventus erat nautis aptus, non aptus amanti. 

solvor ab amplexu, Protesilae, tuo, 
linguaque mandantis verba inperfecta reliquit ; 

vix illud potui dicere triste " vale ! " 
Incnbuit Boreas abreptaque vela tetendit, 15 
. iamque mens longe Protesilaus erat. 
dum potui spectare virum, spectare iuvabat, 

sumque tuos oculos usque secuta meis ; 

1 Laudamia G to : Laudomia P V. 

" Homer, //. ii. 695 ff., refers to the story of Protesilaus, 
and Euripides uses it in his Protesilaus. Compare also 
Hygiuus, Fab. ciii. 

6 With the rest of the Greek fleet, which was under divine 

158 



THE HEROIDES XIII 



my ire leads, will I follow. Mayhap I shall repent 
me of what I do — but I repent me, too, of regard for 
a faithless husband's good. Be that the concern of 
the god who now embroils my heart ! Something 
portentous, surely, is working in my soul ! 



XIII 

Laodamia to Pkotesilaus 

Greetings and health Haemonian Laodamia sends 
her Haemonian lord," and desires with loving heart 
they go where they are sent. 

3 Report says you are held at Aulis by the wind.'' 
Ah, when you were leaving me behind, where then 
was this wind ? Then should the seas have risen 
to stay your oars ; that was the fitting time for 
the floods to rage. I could have given my lord 
more kisses and laid upon him more behests : and 
many are the things I wished to say to yon. But 
you were swept headlong hence ; and the wind that 
invited forth your sails was one your seamen longed 
for, not I ; it was a wind suited to seamen, not to 
one who loved. I must needs loose myself from 
your embrace, Protesilaus, and my tongue leave half 
unsaid what I would enjoin ; scarce had I time t<> 
say that sad " Farewell ! " 

15 Boreas came swooping down, seized on and 
stretched your sails, and my Protesilaus soon was far 
away. As long as I could gaze upon my lord, t<> 
gaze was niv delight, and 1 followed your eyes ever 

displeasure because Agamemnon had killed a etag in the 
grove of Diana. 

'59 



OVID 



ut te non poteram, poteram tua vela videre, 

vela din vultus detinuere nieos. 20 

at postquam nee te nec vela fugacia vidi, 
et quod spectarem nil nisi pontus erat, 

lux quoque tecum abiit, tenebrisque exanguis 
obortis 

sueciduo dicor procubuisse genu, 
vix socer Iphielus, vix me grandaevus Acastus, 25 

vix mater gelida maesta refecit aqua ; 
offieium fecere pium, sed inutile nobis. 

indignor miserae non licuisse mori ! 
Ut rediit animus, pariter rediere dolores. 

pectora legitinuis casta momordit amor. 30 
nee milii peetendos cura est praebere capillos, 

nec libet aurata corpora veste tegi. 
ut quas pampinea tetigisse Bicorniger hasta, 

creditur, hue illue, qua furor egit, eo. 
eonveniunt matres Phylaceides 1 et milii clamant : 35 

" Indue regales, Laudamia, sinus ! " 
scilicet ipsa geram saturatas murice vestes, 

bella sub Iliacis moenibus ille geret ? 
ipsa comas pectar, galea caput ille premetnr ? 

ipsa novas vestes, dura vir arena feret ? 40 
qua 2 possum, squalore tuos imitata labores 

dicar, et haec belli tempora tristis again. 
Dyspari Priamide, damno formose tuorum, 

tain sis hostis iners, quam malus hospes eras ! 

1 phylaceides P 2 oi : phyleides P 1 : phylleides Hein. 
Phyllos was a well known town in Thessaly. 

2 Qua P^ : quo P. 2 u>. 

" The bacchic frenzy. 

160 



THE HEROINES XIII 



with my own ; when I could no longer see you, 1 
still could see your sails, and long your sails detained 
my eyes. But after I descried no more either you 
or your flying sails, and what my eyes rested on was 
naught but only sea, the light, too, went away with 
you, the darkness rose about me, my blood retreated, 
and with failing knee I sank, they say, upon the 
ground. Scarce your sire Iphiclus, scarce mine, the 
aged Acastus, scarce my mother, stricken with grief, 
could bring me back to life with water icy-cold. 
They did their kindly task, but it had no profit for 
me. 'Tis shame I had not in my misery the right 
to die ! 

29 When consciousness returned, my pain returned 
as well. The wifely love 1 bore von has torn at my 
faithful heart. I care not now to let my hair be 
dressed, nor does it pleasure me to be arrayed in 
robes of gold. Like those whom he of the two 
horns is believed to have touched with his vine- 
leafed rod, hither and thither 1 go, where madness 
drives." The matrons of Phylace gather about, and 
cry to me : " Put on thy royal robes, Laodamia ! " 
Shall I, then, go clad in stuffs that are saturate with 
costly purple, while my lord goes warring under the 
walls of Ilion ? Am I to dress my hair, while his 
head is weighed down by the helm ? Am 1 to wear 
new apparel while my lord wears hard and heavy 
arms ? In what 1 can, they shall say I imitate your 
toils — in rude attire ; and these times of war 1 will 
pass in gloom. 

43 Ill-omened Paris, Priam's son, fair at cost of 
thine own kin, mayst thou be as inert a foe as 
thou wert a faithless guest ! Would that either 

1 6 i 

M 



OVID 



aut te Taenariae faciem eulpasse maritae, 45 

aut illi vellem displieuisse tuam ! 
til, qui pro rapta nimium, Menelae, laboras, 

ei mini, quaui multis flebilis ultor eris ! 
di, preeor, a nobis omen removete sinistruni, 

et sua det Reduci vir meus arnia Iovi ! 50 
sed timeo, quotiens subiit miserabile bellum ; 

more nivis laerimae sole madentis eunt. 
llion et Tenedos Simoisque et Xanthus et Ide 

nomina sunt ipso paene timenda sono. 
nec rapere ausurus, nisi se defendere posset, 55 

hospes erat ; vires noverat ille suas. 
venerat, ut fama est, multo spectabilis auro 

quique suo Phrygias corpore ferret opes, 
elasse virisque potens, per quae fera bella geruntur — 

et sequitur regni pars quotaeumque sui ? GO 
his ego te vietam, consors Ledaea gemellis, 

suspieor ; haec Danais posse noeere puto. 1 
Heetora, quisquis is est, si sum tibi cara, caveto ; 65 

signatum memori pectore nomen habe ! 
hunc ubi vitaris, alios vitare memento 

et multos illic Heetoras esse puta ; 
et faeito ut dicas, quotiens pugnare parabis : 

"pareere me iussit Laudamia sibi." 70 
si eadere Argolico fas est sub milite Troiam, 

te quoque non ullum vulnus habente eadat ! 
pugnet et adversos tendat Menelaus in hostis ; 2 

hostibus e mediis nupta petenda viro est. 76 

1 63, G4 spurious Pa. : 

Hectora nescio quern timeo : Paris Hectora dixit 
ferrea sanguinea bella movere manu ; 

2 74, 75 spurious Merk. Pa. : 

ut rapiat Paridi quam Paris aute sibi 
inruat et causa quern vicit, vincat et armis : 

162 



THE HEROIDES XIII 



thou hadst seen fault in the lace of the Taenarian 
wife, or she had taken no pleasure in thine ! Thou, 
Menelaus, who dost grieve o'ennuch for the stolen 
one, ah me, how many shall shed tears for tin- 
revenge ! Ye gods, I pray, keep from us the sinister 
omen, and let my lord hang up his arms to Jove-of- 
Safe-Return ! But I am fearful as oft as the 
wretched war conies to my thoughts : my tears eoine 
forth like snow that melts beneath the sun. Ilion 
and Tenedos and Siinois and Xanthus and Ida are 
names to be feared from their very sound. Nor would 
the stranger have dared the theft if he had not power 
to defend himself; his own strength he well knew. 
He arrived, they say, sightly in much gold, bearing 
upon his person the wealth of Phrvgia, and potent 
in ships and men, with which iierce wars are fought 
— and how great a part of Ins princely power came 
with him ? With means like these were you over- 
come, 1 suspect, O Leda's daughter, sister to the 
Twins ; these are the things I feel may be working 
the Danaans woe. 

05 Of Hector, whoe'er he be, if I am dear to you, 
be ware ; keep his name stamped in ever mindful 
heart! When vou have shunned him, remember to 
shun others ; think that many Hectors are there : 
and see that you say, as oft as you make ready for 
the fight : " Laodatnia bade me spare herself.'' If it 
be fated Troy shall fall before the Argulie host, let 
it also fall without your taking a single wound ! Let 
Menelaus battle, let him press to meet the foe ; lo 
seek the wife from the midst of the foe is the 

» 'J 



OVID 



causa tua est dispar ; tu tantum vivere pugna, 

inque pios dominae posse redire sinus. 
Parcite, Dardanidaej de tot, precox hostibus uni, 

ne raeus ex illo corpore sanguis eat ! 80 
non est quern deceat nudo concurrere ferro, 

saevaque in oppositos pectora ferre viros ; 
fortius ille potest multo, quam pugnat, amare. 

bella gerant alii ; Protesilaus amet ! 
Nunc fateor — volui revocare, animusquc ferebat ; 85 

substitit auspicii lingua timore mali. 
cum foribus velles ad Troiain exire paternis, 

pes tuus ofFenso limine signa dedit. 
nt vidi 3 ingenmi, taci toque in pectore dixi : 

" signa reversuri sint, precor, ista viri ! " 90 
haec tibi nunc refero, ne sis animosus in armis ; 

faCj mens in ventos hie timor onmis eat ! 
Sors quoque nescio quern fato designat iniquo, 

qui primus Danaum Troada tangat humum. 
infeliXj quae prima virum lugebit ademptum ! 95 

di faciant, ne tu strenuus esse velis ! 
inter mille rates tua sit millensima puppis, 

iamque fatigatas ultima verset aquas ! 
hoc quoque praemoneo : de nave novissimus exi ; 

non est, quo properas, terra patcnia tibi. 100 
cum venieSj remoque move veloque carinam 

inque tuo celerem litore siste gradum ! 
Sive latet Phoebus seu terris altior exstat, 

tu mihi luce dolor, tu mihi nocte venis, 



THE HEROIDES XIII 



husband's part. Your case is not the same ; do vou 
fight merely to live, and to return to your faithful 
queen's embrace. 

79 O ye sons of Dardanus, spare, I pray, from so 
many foes at least one, lest my blood flow from 
that body ! He is not one it befits to engage with 
bared steel in the shock of battle, to present a 
savage breast to the opposing foe ; his might is 
greater far in love than on the field. Let others go 
to the wars ; let Protesilaus love ! 

S5 I confess now, I would have called you back, 
and my spirit strove ; but my tongue stood still for 
fear of evil auspice. When you would fare forth 
from your paternal doors to Troy, your foot, stumbling 
upon the threshold, gave ill sign. At the sight I 
groaned, and in my secret heart I said: if May this, 
I pray, be omen that my lord return!" Of this I 
tell you now, lest you be too forward with your 
arms. See you make this fear of mine all vanish to 
the winds ! 

93 There is a prophecy, too, that marks someone 
for an unjust doom — the first of the Danaans to 
touch the soil of Troy. Unhappy she who first 
shall wee]) for her slain lord ! The gods keep you 
from being too eager ! Among the thousand ships 
let yours be the thousandth craft, and the last to stir 
the already wearied wave ! This, too, I warn you of: 
be last to leave your ship ; the land to which you 
haste is not your father's soil. When you return, 
then speed your keel with oar and sail at once, and 
on your own shore stay your hurried pace. 

103 Whether Phoebus be hid, or high above the 
earth he rise, you are my care by day, you come to 
me in the night; and yet more by night than in the 

l6 5 



OVID 



nocte tamen quam luce magis — nox grata 

puellis 105 

quarum suppositus colla laeertus habet. 
auenpor in lecto mendaces caelibe somnos ; 

dum careo veris gaudia falsa iuvant. 
Sed tua cur nobis pallens occurrit imago ? 

cur venit a labris 1 multa querela tuis ? 110 
excutior somno simulacraque noctis adoro ; 

nulla caret fumo Thessalis ara meo ; 
tura damus lacrimamque super, qua sparsa relucet, 

ut solet adfuso surge re flamma mero. 
quando ego, te redueem cupidis amplexa laeertis, 115 

languida laetitia solvar ab ipsa raea? 
quando erit, ut lecto mecum bene innctus in uno 

militiae referas splendida facta tuae ? 
quae mihi dum referes, quam vis audire iuvabit, 

multa tamcn capies oscnla, multa dabis. 120 
semper in his apte narrantia verba resistunt ; 

promptior est dulci lingua referre mora. 
Sed cum Troia subit, subeunt vcntique fretumque ; 

spes bona sollicito victa timore cadit. 
hoc quoque, quod venti prohibent exire carinas, 125 

me movet — invitis ire paratis aquis. 
quis velit in patriam vento prohibente reverti ? 

a patria pelago vela vetante datis ! 
ipse suam non praebet iter Xeptunus ad urbem. 

quo ruitis ? vestras quisque redite domos ! 130 
quo ruitis, Danai ? ventos audite vetantis ! 

non subiti casus, minimis ista mora est. 

1 a labris Birt. Sedl. Jackson (T?-ans. Camb. Phil. Soc. I, 
p. 377 n.). 

" The final flare when the fire at the altar is quenched. 
166 



THE HEROIDES XIII 



light of day — night is welcome to women beneath 
whose necks an embracing arm is placed. 1, in my 
widowed couch, can only court a sleep with lying 
dreams ; while true joys fail me, false ones must 
delight. 

109 But why does your face, all pale, appear before 
me ? Why from your lips comes many a complaint ? 
I shake slumber from me, and pray to the apparitions 
of night ; there is no Thessalian altar without smoke 
of mine ; I offer incense, and let fall upon it my tears, 
and the flame brightens up again as when wine has 
been sprinkled o'er. rt When shall I clasp you, safe re- 
turned, in my eager arms, and lose myself in languish- 
ing delight ? When will it be mine to have yon again 
close joined to me on the same couch, telling me your 
glorious deeds in the field ? And while you arc tell- 
ing them, though it delight to hear, you will snatch 
many kisses none the less, and will give me manv 
back. The words of well-told tales meet ever with 
such stops as this ; more ready for report is the 
tongue refreshed by sweet delay. 

123 But when Troy rises in my thoughts, I think 
of the winds and sea; fair hope is overcome by 
anxious fear, and falls. This, too, moves me, that 
the winds forbid your keels to fire forth — yet you 
make ready to sail despite the seas. Who would 
be willing to return homeward with the wind 
saying nay ? Yet you trim sail to leave your homes, 
though the sea forbids ! Neptune himself will 
open up no way for you against his own city. 
Whither your headlong course? Return ye all 
to your own abodes ! Whither your headlong 
eourse, O Dn nanus ? Heed the winds that say you 
nay ! No sudden chance, but God himself, sends 

167 



OVID 



quid petitur tanto nisi turpis adultera bello ? 

dum licet, Inachiae vertite vela rates ! 
sed quid ago? revoco ? revocaminis omen abesto, 135 

blandaque conpositas aura secundet aquas ! 
Troasin invideo, quae sic lacrimosa suorum 

fun era conspicient, nec procul hostis erit. 
ipsa suis manibus forti nova nupta marito 

in])onet galeam Dardanaque anna dabit. 140 
anna dabit, dumque anna dabit, simul oscula 
sumet — 

hoc genus officii dulce duobus erit — 
producetque virum, dabit et niandata reverti 

et dicet : " referas ista fac anna Iovi ! '* 
ille ferens dominae mandata recentia secum 145 

pugnabit caute resj)icietque domum. 
exuet haec reduei cli])eum galeamque resolvet, 

excipietque suo corpora lassa sinu. 
Nos sumus incertae ; nos anxius omnia cogit, 

quae possunt fieri, facta putare timor. 150 
dum tamen anna geres diverso miles in orbe, 

quae referat vultas est milii cera tuos ; 
illi blanditias, ill! tibi debita verba 

dicimus, amplexus accipit ilia meos. 
crede mihi, plus est, quam quod videatur, 

imago; 155 

adde sonum cerae, Protesilaus erit. 
hanc specto teneoque sinu pro coniuge vero, 

et, tamquain possit verba referre, queror. 
168 



THE HERO IDES XIII 



that delay of yours. What is your quest in so great 
a war but a shameful wanton ? While you mav, 
reverse your sails, O ships of Inachus ! But what 
am I doing? Do I call you back? Far from me 
be .the omen of calling back ; may caressing gales 
second a peaceful sea ! 

137 I envy the women who dwell in Troy, who will 
thus behold the tearful fates of them they love, with 
the foe not far away. With her own hand the newly 
wedded bride will set the helmet upon her valiant 
husband's head, and give into his hands the Dar- 
danian arms. She will give him his arms, and the 
while she gives him arms will receive his kisses — 
a kind of office sweet to both — and will lead her 
husband forth, and lay on him the command to 
return, and say: "See that you bring once more 
those arms to Jove ! " He, bearing fresh in mind 
with him the command of his mistress, will fight with 
caution, and be mindful of his home. When safe 
returned, she will strip him of his shield, unloose his 
helm, and receive to her embrace his wearied 
frame. 

140 But we are left uncertain ; we are forced by 
anxious fear to fancy all things befallen which may 
befall. None the less, while yon, a soldier in a 
distant world, will be bearing arms, I keep a waxen 
image to give back your features to my sight ; it 
hears the caressing phrase, it hears the Avords of 
love that are yours by right, and it receives my 
embrace. Believe me, the image is more than it 
appears ; add but a voice to the wax, Protesilaus 
it will be. On this I look, and hold it to my heart 
in place of my real lord, and complain to it, as if it 
could speak again. 

169 



OVID 



Per reditus corpusque tuum, mea numina, iuro, 
perque pares animi eoniugiique faces, 1 1G0 

me tibi venturam eomitem, quoeumque vocaris, 163 
sive — quod heu ! timeo — sive superstes eris. 

ultima mandato elaudetur epistula parvo : 
si tibi eura mei, sit tibi eura tui ! 



XIV 

Hypermestra Lynceo 

jVIittit Hypermestra de tot modo fratribus uni — 

cetera nuptarum crimine turba iacet. 
clausa domo teneor gravibusque coercita viuclis ; 

est mihi supplicii causa fuisse piani. 
quod manus extimuit iugulo demittere ferrum, 5 

sum rea : laudarer, si scelus ausa forem. 
esse ream praestat, quam sic placuisse parenti ; 

non piget inmuiies caedis habere manus. 
me pater igne licet, quern non violavimus, urat, 

quaeque aderant sacris, tendat in ora faces ; 10 
ant illo iugulet, quern non bene tradidit ensem, 

ut, qua non cecidit vir nece, nupta cadam — 
non turn en, ut dicant morientia •'' paenitet ! " ora, 

efficiet. non est, quam piget esse piam. 
paeniteat sceleris Danaum saevasque sorores ; 15 

hie solet eventus facta nefanda sequi. 

1 161, 162 s]mrious Pa. : 

perque, quod ut videam canis albere capillis, 
quod tecum possis ipse referre, caput. 

170 



THE HEHOIDES XIV 



159 By thy return and by thyself, who art my god, 
I swear, and by the torches alike of our love and 
our wedding-day, I will come to be thy comrade 
whithersoever thou dost call, whether that which, 
alas, I fear, shall come to pass, or whether thou shalt 
still survive. The last of my missive, ere it close, 
shall be the brief behest : if thou carest ought for 
me, then care thou for thyself! 



XIV 

H Y l'E It M N EST II A TO LyNCEUS 

Hypermnestiia sends this letter to the one 
brother left of so many but now alive — the rest 
of the company lie dead by the crime of their 
brides. Kept close in the palace am I, bound with 
heavy chains ; and the cause of my punishment is 
that I was faithful. Ik-cause my hand shrank from 
driving into your throat the steel, I am charged 
with crime ; I should be praised, had I but dared 
the deed. Better be charged with crime than thus 
to have pleased my sire ; I feel no regret at having 
hands free from the shedding of blood. My father 
may burn me with the Maine a I would not violate, 
and hold to my face the torches that shone at my 
marriage rites ; or he may lay to my throat the 
sword he falsely gave me, so that I, the wife, may 
die the death my husband did not die — yet he will 
not bring my dying lips to say" I repent me ! " She 
is not faithful who regrets her faith. Let repent- 
ance for crime come to Danaus and my cruel sisters ; 
this is the wonted event that follows on wicked deeds. 
" Of the marriage-altar. 

171 



OVID 



Cor pavet admonitu temeratae sanguine noctis, 

et subitus dextrae praepedit ossa tremor, 
quam tu caede putes fungi potuisse mariti, 

scribere de facta non sibi caede timet ! 20 
Sed tamen experiar. modo facta crepuscula terris ; 

ultima pars lucis primaque noctis erat. 
ducimur Inachides magni sub tecta Pelasgi, 

et socer armatas accipit ipse nurus. 
undique conlucent praecinctae lampades auro ; 25 

dantur in invitos inpia tura focos ; 
vulgus " Hymen, Hymen aee ! " vocant. fugit ille 
vocantis ; 

ipsa Iovis coniunx cessit ab urbe sua ! 
ecce, mero dubii, comitum clamore frequentes, 

flore novo madidas inpediente comas, 30 
in thalamos laeti — thalamos, sua busta ! — feruntur 

strataque corporibus funere digna premunt. 
Iamque cibo vinoque graves somnoque iacebant, 

securumque quies alta per Argos erat — 
circum me gemitus morientum audire videbar ; 35 

et tamen audibam, 1 quodque verebar erat. 
sanguis abit, mentemque calor corpusque relinquit, 

inque novo iacui frigida facta toro. 
ut leni Zephyro graciles vibrantur aristae, 

frigida populeas ut quatit aura comas, 40 
ant sic, aut etiam tremui magis. ipse iacebas, 

quaeque tibi dederam, vina 2 soporis erant. 

1 andibam P Burm.: audieram s Gl : auditum j. 

2 vina P G V u>: plena Pa. 

a Inachns, Io, Epaplms, Libya, Belus, Danaus — was their 
descent. * King of Argos. c Aegyptus. 



172 



THE HEROIDES XIV 



17 My heart is struck with fear at remembrance 
of that night profaned with blood, and sudden 
trembling fetters the bones of my right hand. She 
you think capable of having compassed her husband's 
death fears even to write of murder done by hands 
not her own ! 

21 Yet I shall essay to write. Twilight had just 
settled on the earth ; it was the last part of day 
and the first of night. We daughters of Inachus a 
are escorted beneath the roof of great Pelasgns, 6 and 
our husbands' father c himself receives the armed 
brides of his sons. • On every side shine bright the 
lamps girt round with gold ; unholy incense is 
scattered on unwilling altar-fires ; the crowd crv 
"Hymen, Hymenaeus. ! " The god shuns their 
cry ; Jove's very consort has withdrawn from the 
city of her choice ! Then, look you, confused with 
wine, they come in rout amidst the cries of their 
companions ; with fresh flowers in their dripping 
locks, all joyously they burst into the bridal chambers 
— the bridal chambers, their own tombs ! — and with 
their bodies press the couches that deserve to be 
funeral beds. 

33 And now, heavy with food and wine they lay in 
sleep, and deep repose had settled on Argos, free 
from care — when round about me J seemed to hear 
the groans of dying men ; nay, I heard indeed, 
and what I feared was true. My blood retreated, 
warmth left my body and soul, and on my newly- 
wedded couch all chill I lay. As the gentle zephyr 
sets a-quiver the slender stalk of grain, as wintry 
breezes shake the poplar leaves, even thus — yea, 
even more — did I tremble. Yourself lay quiet ; the 
wine 1 had given you was the wine of sleep. 



173 



OVID 



Excussere metum violenti iussa parentis ; 

evigor et ca])io tela tremente manu. 
non ego falsa loquar : ter aeutum sustulit ensem, 45 

ter male sublato reccidit ense maims, 
admovi iugnlo — sine me tibi vera fateri ! — 

admovi iugulo tela paterna tuo ; 
sed timor et pietas erudelibus obstitit ausis, 

castaque mandatum dextra refugit opus. 50 
purpnreos laniata sinus, laniata capillos 

exiguo dixi talia verba sono : 
" saevus, Hypermestra, pater est tibi ; iussa parentis 

effice ; germanis sit comes iste suis ! 
femina sum et virgo, natura mitis et annis ; 55 

non faciunt molles ad fera tela maims, 
quin age^ dumque iacet, fortis imitare sorores — 

credibile est caesos omnibus esse viros ! 
si maims haec aliquam posset committerc caedeni, 

morte foret dominae sanguinolenta suae. GO 
banc meruere necem patruelia regna tenendo ; 

cum sene nos ino])i turba vagamur inops. 1 
finge viros meruisse mori — quid fecimus ipsae ? 

quo mihi eommisso non licet esse piae ? 
quid mihi cum ferro? quo bellica tela puellae ? G5 

aptior est digitis lana colusque meis." 
Haec ego ; dumque queror, lacrimae sua verba se- 
qvmutur 

deque meis oculis in tua membra cadunt. 

dum petis amplexus sopitaque braccliia iactas, 

paene manns telo saucia facta tua est. 70 

1 1 14 pfacecZ here by Hons, who omits G'2 and 113, fabricated 
to accommodate the misplaced 114. 

174 



THE HEROIDES XIV 



43 Thought of my violent father's mandates struck 
away my fear. I rise, and clutch with trembling 
hand the steel. 1 will not tell yon aught untrue : 
thrice did my hand raise high the piercing blade, 
and thrice, having basely raised it, fell again. I 
brought it to your throat — let me confess to you the 
truth ! — I brought my father's weapon to your 
throat ; but fear and tenderness kept me from 
daring the cruel stroke, and my chaste right hand 
refused the task enjoined. Rending the purple 
robes I wore, rending my hair, I spoke with scant 
sound such words as these : " A cruel father, Hyper- 
mnestra, thine ; perform thy sire's command, and let 
thy husband there go join his brethren ! A woman 
am I, and a maid, gentle in nature and in years ; 
my tender hands ill suit fierce weapons. But come, 
while he lies there, do like as thy brave sisters — it 
well may be that all have slain their husbands ! 
Yet bad this hand power to deal out murder at 
all, it would be bloody with the death of its 
own mistress. They have deserved this end for 
seizing on their uncle's realms; we, helpless band, 
must wander in exile with our aged, helpless sire. 
Yet snppose our husbands have deserved to die — 
what have we done ourselves? What crime have 1 
committed that I must not be free from guilt ? 
What have swords to do with me ? What has a girl 
to do with the weapons of war ? More suited to my 
hands are the distaff and the wool." 

07 Thus I to myself; and while I utter my com- 
plaint, my tears follow forth the words that start 
them, and from my eyes fall down upon your body. 
While yon grope for my embrace and toss your 
slumbrous arms, your hand is almost wounded by 



175 



OVID 



iamque patrem famulosque patris lucemque timebam 

expulerunt somnos haec mea dicta tuos : 
"surge age, Belide, de tot modo fratribus unus ! 

nox tibi_, ni properas, ista perennis evit ! " 
territus exsurgis ; fugit omnis inertia sonini ; 75 

adspicis in timid a fortia tela manu. 
quaerenti causam " dum nox sinit, effuge ! " dixi. 

duni nox atra sinit, tn fugis, ipsa moror. 
Mane erat, et Danaus generos ex caede iacentis 

dinunierat. summae criminis nmis abes. 80 
fert male cognatae iacturam mortis in nno 

et queritur facti sanguinis esse parum. 
abstrahor a patriis pedibus, raptamque capillis — 

haec meruit pietas praemia ! — career habet. 
Scilicet ex illo Iunonia permanet ira 85 

cum bos ex h omine est, ex bove facta dea. 
at satis est poenae teneram mugisse puellam 

nee, modo formosam, posse placere Iovi. 
adstitit in ripa liquidi nova vacca parentis, 

cornuaque in patriis non sua vidit aquis, 90 
conatoque queri mugitus edidit ore 

territaque est forma, territa voce sua. 
quid furis, infelix ? quid te miraris in umbra ? 

quid numeras factos ad nova membra pedes ? 
ilia Iovis magni paelex metuenda sorori 95 

fronde levas nimiam caespitibusque famem, 



" Belue, Aegj'ptus, Lynceus. 

* The storj* of Io, daughter of the river Inachus. 



176 



OVID 



tortaque versato ducentes stamina fuso 

feminea tardas fallimus arte moras. 
Quid loquar iuterea tarn longo tempore, quaeris ? 

nil nisi Leandri nomen in ore meo est. 40 
"iamne putas exisse domo mea gaudia, nutrix, 

an vigilant omnes, et timet ille suos ? 
iamne suas umeris ilium deponere vestes, 

pallade iam pingui tinguere membra putas ? " 
adnuit ilia fere ; 1 non nostra quod oscula curet, 45 

sed movet obrepens somnus anile caput, 
postque morae minimum "iam certe navigat," 
inquam, 

" lentaque dimotis bracchia iactat aquis." 
paucaque cum tacta perfeci stamina terra, 

an medio possis, quaerimus, esse freto. 50 
et modo prospicimus, timida modo voce precamur, 

ut tibi det faciles utilis aura vias ; 
auribus incertas voces captamus, et omnem 

adventus strepitum credimus esse tui. 
Sic ubi deceptae pars est mihi maxima noctis 55 

acta, subit furtim lumina fessa sopor, 
forsitan invitus mecum tamen, inprobe, dormis, 

et, quamquam non vis ipse venire, venis. 
nam modo te videor prope iam spectare natantem, 

bracchia nunc umeris umida ferre meis, . 60 
nunc dare, quae soleo, madidis velamina membris, 

pectora nunc iuncto nostra fovere sinu 
multaque praeterea linguae reticenda modestae, 

quae fecisse iuvat, facta referre pudet. 
me miseram ! brevis est haec et non vera 
voluptas ; 65 

nam tu cum somno semper abire soles. 

1 fore P Va>. 

262 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



ing with whirling spindle the twisted thread, with 
woman's art Ave beguile the slow hours of waiting. 

39 What, meanwhile, I say through so long a 
time, yon ask ? Naught but Leander's name is 
on my lips. " Do you think my joy has already 
come forth from his home, my nurse ? or are all 
waking, and does he fear his kin ? Now do you 
think he is putting off the robe from his shoulders, 
and now rubbing the rich oil into his limbs ? " She 
signs assent, most likely ; not that she cares for my 
kisses, but slumber creeps upon her and lets nod her 
ancient head. Then, after slightest pause, " Now 
surely he is setting forth on his voyage," I say, " and 
is parting the waters with the stroke of his pliant 
arms." And when I have finished a few strands 
and the spindle has touched the ground, 1 ask 
whether you can be mid way of the strait. And 
now I look forth, and now in timid tones I pray 
that a favouring breeze will give you an easy eourse ; 
my ears catch at uncertain notes, and at every 
sound I am sure thaf you have come. 

65 When the greatest part of the night has gone 
by for me in such delusions, sleep steals upon my 
wearied eyes. Perhaps, false one, you yet pass the 
night with me, though against your will ; perhaps 
you come, though yourself you do not wish to come. 
For now I seem to see you already swimming near, 
and now to feel your wet arms about my neck, and 
now to throw about your dripping limbs the accus- 
tomed coverings, and now to warm our bosoms in 
the close embrace — and many things else a modest 
tongue should say naught of, whose memory delights, 
but whose telling brings a blush. Ah me ! brief 
pleasures these, and not the truth ; for you are 

263 



OVID 



firmius, o, cupidi tandem coeamus amantes, 

nec careant vera gaudia nostra fide ! 
cur ego tot viduas exegi frigida noctes ? 

cur totiens a me, lente morator, 1 abcs ? 70 
est mare, confiteor, uondum tractabile nanti ; 

nocte sed hestenia lenior aura fuit. 
cur ea praeterita est ? cur non ventura timebas ? 

tarn bona cur periit, nec tibi rapta via est ? 
protinus ut similis detur tibi copia cursus, 75 

hoc melior certe, quo prior, ilia fuit. 
At eito mutata est iactati forma profundi. 

tempore, cum properas, saepe minore venis. 
hie, puto, deprensus nil, quod querereris, haberes, 

meque tibi amplexo nulla noceret hiemps. SO 
certe ego turn ventos audirem laeta sonantis, 

et numquam placidas esse precarer aquas, 
quid tamen evenit, cur sis metuentior undae 

contemptumque prius nunc vereare fretum ? 
nam memini, cum te saevum veniente minaxque 85 

non minus, aut multo non minus, aequor erat ; 
cum tibi clamabam : " sic tu temerarius esto, 

ne miserae virtus sit tua Henda mihi ! " 
unde novus timor hie, quoque ilia audacia fugit ? 

magnus ubi est spretis ille natator aquis ? 90 
Sis tamen hoc potius, quam quod prius esse solebas, 

et facias placidum per mare tutus iter— 
dummodo sis idem, dum sic, ut scribis, amemur, 

flammaque non fiat frigidus ilia cinis. 

1 morator FP 1 s : natator co P ? . 

264 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



ever wont to go when slumber goes. O more firmly let 
our eager loves be knit, and our joys be faithful and 
true ! Why have I passed so many cold and lonely 
nights? Why, O tardy loiterer, are you so often 
away from me ? The sea, 1 grant, is not yet fit for 
the swimmer ; but yesternight the gale was gentler. 
Why did you let it pass ? Why did you fear what 
was not to come ? Why did so fair a night go 
by for naught, and you not seize upon the way ? 
Grant that like chance for coming be given you 
soon ; this chance was the better, surely, since 'twas 
the earlier. 

77 But swiftly, you may say, the face of the storm- 
tossed deep was changed. Yet you often come in 
less time, when you are in haste. Overtaken here, 
you would have, methinks, no reason to complain, 
and while you held me close no storm would 
harm you. I surely should hear the sounding winds 
with joy, and should pray for the waters never 
to be calm. But what has come to pass, that you 
are grown more fearful of the wave, and dread the 
sea you before despised ? For I call to mind your 
coming once when the flood was not less fierce and 
threatening — or not much less ; when I cried to you : 
" Be ever rash with such good fortune, lest wretched 
I may have to wee]) for your courage ! " Whence 
this new fear, and whither has that boldness fled ? 
Where is that mighty swimmer who scorned the 
waters ? 

91 But no, be rather as you are than as you were 
wont to be before ; make your way when the sea is 
placid, and be safe — so you are only the same, so we 
only love each other, as you write, and that flame of 
ours turn not to chill ashes. I do not fear so much 



265 



OVID 



non ego tarn ventos timeo mea vota morantes, 95 

quam similis vento ne tuus erret amor, 
ne non sim tanti, superentque pericula causani, 

et videar merces esse labore minor. 
Interdum metuo, patria ne laedar et inpar 

dicar Abydeno Thressa puella toro. 100 
ferre tamen possum patientius omnia, quam si 

otia nescio qua paelice captus agis, 
in tua si veniunt alieni colla lacerti, 

fitque novus nostri finis amoris amor. 
r, potius peream, quam erimine vulnerer isto, 105 

fataque sint culpa nostra priora tua ! 
nec, quia venturi dederis mibi signa doloris, 

haec loquor aut fama sollicitata nova, 
omnia sed vereor — quis enim securus amavit ? 

eogit et absentes plura timere locus. 110 
felices illas, sua quas praesentia nossc 

crimina vera iubet, falsa timere vetat ! 
nos tarn vaua movet, quam facta iniuria fallit, 

incitat et morsus error uterque pares, 
o utinam venias, aut ut ventusve paterve 115 

causaque sit certe femina nulla morae ! 
quodsi quam sciero, moriar, mihi crede, dolendo ; 

iamdudum pecca, si mea fata petis ! 
Sed neque peeeabis, frustraque ego terreor istis, 

quoque minus venias, invida pugnat hiemps. 120 
me miseram ! quanto planguntur litora fluctu, 

et latet obscura condita nube dies ! 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



the winds that hinder my vows as I fear that like 
the wind your love may wander — that I may not 
be worth it all, that your perils may outweigh their 
cause, and I seem a reward too slight for your 
toils. 

99 Sometimes I fear my birthplace may injure 
me, and I be called no match, a Thracian maid, for a 
husband from Abydos. Yet could I bear with greater 
patience all things else than have you linger in the 
bonds of some mistress's charms, see other arms 
clasped round your neck, and a new love end the 
love we bear. Ah, may I rather perish than be 
wounded by such a crime, may fate overtake me 
ere you incur that guilt ! I do not say these 
words because you have given sign that such grief 
will come to me, or because some recent tale has 
made me anxious, but because I fear everything — 
for who that loved was ever free from care ? The 
fears of the absent, too, are multiplied by distance. 
Happy they whom their own presence bids know 
the true charge, and forbids to fear the false ! Me 
wrongs imaginary fret, while the real I cannot know, 
and either error stirs equal gnawings in my heart. 
O, would you only come ! or did I only know that 
the wind, or your father — at least, no woman — kept 
you back ! Were it a woman, and I should know, I 
should die of grieving, believe me ; sin against me 
at once, if you desire my death ! 

119 But you will not sin against me, and my 
fears of such troubles are vain. The reason you 
do not come is the jealous storm that beats you 
back. Ah, wretched me ! with what great waves 
the shores are beaten, and what dark clouds envelop 
and hide the day ! It may be the loving mother of 

267 



OVID 



forsitan ad puntum mater pia venerit Helles, 

mersaque roratis nata fleatur aquis — 
an mare ab inviso privignae nomine dictum 125 

vexat in aequoream versa noverca deam ? 
non favet, ut nunc est, 1 teneris locus iste puellis ; 

hac Helle periit, hae ego laedor aqua, 
at tibi flammarum memori, Neptune, tuarum 

null us erat ventis inpediendus amor — 130 
si neque Amymone nec, laudatissima forma, 

criminis est Tyro fabula vana tui, 
lucidaque Alcyone Calyeeque Hecataeone nata, 2 

et nondum nexis angue Medusa comis, 
flavaque Laudice caeloque recepta Celaeno, 135 

et quarum memini nomina lecta mihi. 
has certe pluresque canunt, Neptune, poetae 

molle latus lateri conposuisse tuo. 
cur igitur, totiens vires expertus amoris, 

adsuetum nobis turbine claudis iter? 140 
parce, ferox, latoque mari tua proelia misce ! 

seducit terras haec brevis unda duas. 
te decet aut magnas magnum iactare carinas, 

aut etiam totis classibus esse trucem ; 
turpe deo pelagi iuvenem terrere natantem, 145 

gloriaque est stagno quolibet ista minor, 
nobilis ille quidem est et clarus origine, sed non 

a tibi suspecto ducit Ulixe genus, 
da veniam servaque duos ! natat ille, sed isdem 

corpus Leandri, spes mea pendet aquis.* 150 

1 utcunique est DiKhey Ehw. 

2 ceuceque et aveone P : celiceque et aveone G : ceyce et 
aveone V : Calyeeque Ecatheone (Hecataeone) Hein. 

a Nephele, mother of Phrixns and Helle. 

6 Ino, second wife of Helle's father Athamas. 

" Such learned enumerations of the love adventures of 



268 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



Helle has corae to the sea, and is lamenting in down- 
pouring tears the drowning of her child " — or is the 
step-dame, turned to a goddess of the waters, vexing 
the sea that is called by her step-ehild's hated name ? 1 
This place, such as 'tis now, is aught but friendly 
to tender maids ; by these waters Helle perished, 
by them my own affliction comes. Yet, Neptune, 
wert thou mindful of thine own heart's flames, thou 
oughtst let no love be hindered by the winds — if 
neither Amymone, nor Tyro much bepraised for 
beauty, are stories idly eharged to thee, nor shining 
Alcyone, and Calyce, child of Hecataeon, nor Medusa 
when her locks were not yet twined with snakes, nor 
golden-haired Laodice and Celaeno taken to the 
skies, nor those whose names I mind me of having 
read. 6 These, surely, Neptune, and many more, the 
poets say in their songs have mingled their soft 
embraces with thine own. Why, then, dost thou, 
who hast felt so many times the power of love, close 
up with whirling storm the way we have learned to 
know ? Spare us, impetuous one, and mingle thy 
battles out upon the open deep ! These waters, that 
separate two lands, are scant. It befits thee, who art 
mighty, either to toss about the mighty keel, or to 
be fierce even with entire fleets ; 'tis shame for the 
god of the great sea to terrify a swimming youth — 
that glory is less than should come from troubling any 
pond. Noble he is, to be sure, and of a famous 
stoek, but he does not trace his line from the Ulysses 
thou dost not trust. Have merey on him, and save 
us both ! It is he who swims, but the limbs of 
Leander and all my hopes hang on the selfsame wave. 

gods appear to have been a form of poetry cultivated by the 
Alexandrines." Purser, in Palmer p. 47">. 

269 



OVID 



Sternuit en 1 lumen ! — posito nam scribimus illo — 

sternuit et nobis prospera signa dedit. 
ecce,, meruin nutrix faustos instillat in ignes, 

"eras " que " erimus plures/' inquit, et ipsa bibit. 
effice nos plures, evicta per aequora lapsus, 155 

o penitus toto corde recepte mihi ! 
in tua eastra redi, socii desertor amoris ; 

ponuntur medio cur mea membra toro ? 
quod timeaSj non est ! auso Venus ipsa favebit, 

sternet et aequoreas aequore nata vias. 160 
ire libet niedias ipsi mihi saepe per undas, 

sed solet hoc maribus tutius esse fretum. 
nam cur hac vectis Phrixo Phrixique sorore 

sola dedit vastis femina nomen aquis ? 
Forsitan ad reditum metuas ne tempora desint, 165 

aut gemini nequeas ferre laboris onus, 
at nos diversi medium coeamus in aequor 

obviaque in summis oscula dermis aquis, 
atque ita quisque suas iterum redeamus ad urbes ; 

exiguum, sed plus quam nihil illud erit ! 170 
vel pudor hie ittinam, qui nos clam cogit amare, 

vel timidus famae cedere vellet amor ! 
nunc male res iunctae, calor et reverentia, pugnant. 

quid sequar, in dubio est ; haec decet, ille iuvat. 
ut semel intravit Colchos Pagasaeus Iason, 175 

inpositam celeri Phasida puppe tulit ; 
ut semel Idaeus Lacedaemona venit adulter, 

cum praeda rediit protinus ille sua. 

1 et MSS.: en Bent. Hem. 

° She drops water into the flame of the lamp, either to 
clear the wick or to honour the omen. 



270 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



161 My lamp has sputtered, see ! — for I am writing 
with it near — it has sputtered and given us favour- 
ing sign. Look, nurse is pouring drops into auspicious 
fires. a "To-morrow," she says, " we shall be more," 
and herself drinks of the wine. Ah, do make us 
more, glide over the conquered wave, O you whom 
I have weleomed to all my inmost heart ! Come 
hack to cam]), deserter of your ally love ; why must 
I lay my limbs in the mid space of my couch ? 
There is naught for you to fear! Venus' self will 
smile upon your venture ; child of the sea, the paths 
of the sea she will make smooth. Oft am 1 prompted 
myself to go through the midst of the waves, but 
'tis the wont of this strait to be safer for men. For 
why, though Phrixus and Phrixus' sister both rode 
this way, did the maiden alone give name to these 
wide waters ? 

165 p er h a p S you fear the time may fail you for 
return, or you may not endure the effort of the 
twofold toil. Then let us both from diverse ways 
come together in mid sea, and give each other kisses 
on the waters' erest, and so return again each to his 
own town ; 'twill be little, but more than naught ! 
Would that either this shame that eompels us to 
secret loving would cease, or else the love that fears 
men's speeeh. Now, two things that ill go together, 
passion and regard for men, are at strife. Which 
I shall follow is in doubt ; the one becomes, the 
other delights. Once had Jason of Pagasae entered 
Colchis, and he set the maid of the Phasis in his 
swift ship and bore her off; once had the lover 
from Ida come to Lacedaemon, and he straight 
returned together with his prize. But you, as oft 

27 1 



OVID 



tu quam saepe petis, quod amas, tarn saepe relinquis, 

et quotiens grave sit 1 puppibus ire, natas. 180 
Sic tamen, o iuvenis tumidarum victor aquarum, 

sic facito spemas, ut vereare, fretum ! 
arte laboratae merguntur ab aequore naves ; 

tu tua plus remis bracchia posse putas ? 
quod cupis, hoc nautae metuunt, Leandre, natare ; 185 

exitus hie fractis puppibus esse solet. 
me miseram ! cupio non persnadere, quod hortor, 

sisque, precor, monitis fortior ipse meis — 
dummodo pervenias excussaque saepe per undas 

inicias umeris bracchia lassa meis ! 190 
Sed mihi, caeruleas quotiens obvertor ad undas, 

nescio quae pavidum frigora 2 pectus habet. 
nec minus hesternae confundor imagine noctis, 

quamvis est sacris ilia piata meis. 
namque sub aurora, iam dormitante lucerna, 195 

sonmia quo cerni tempore vera solent, 
stamina de digitis cecidere sopore remissis, 

collaque pulvino nostra ferenda dedi. 
hie ego ventosas nantem delphina per undas 

eernere non dubia sum mihi visa fide, 200 
quern postquam bibulis inlisit fluctus harenis, 

nnda simul miserum vitaque deseruit. 
quidquid id est, timeo ; nec tu mea somnia ride 

nec nisi tranquillo bracchia crede mari ! 
si tibi non parcis, dilectae parce puellae, 205 

quae numquam nisi te sospite sospes ero ! 

1 sit Vs Bent. Hons.: fit PG. 

2 So Bimn.: quorl P: quae VG : quid G„ : frigora V : 
frigore PG: habent s : ha/// V: habet PG. 

272 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



as you seek your love, so oft you leave her, and 
whene'er 'tis peril for boats to go, you swim. 

1S1 Yet, O my young lover, though victor over 
the swollen waters, so spurn the sea as still to be 
in fear of it! Ships wrought with skill are over- 
whelmed by the wave ; do you think your arms 
more powerful than oars ? What you are eager for, 
Leander — to swim — is the sailor's fear ; 'tis that 
follows ever on the wreck of ships. Ah, wretched 
me ! I am eager not to persuade you to what I 
urge ; may you be too strong, I pray, to yield to 
my admonition — only so you come to me, and cast 
about my neck the wearied arms oft beaten by the 
wave ! 

191 But, as often as I turn my face toward the 
dark blue wave, my fearful breast is seized by some 
hidden chill. Nor am I the less perturbed by a 
dream I had yesternight, though I have cleared 
myself of its threat by sacrifice. For, just before 
dawn, when my lamp was already dying down, 
at the time when dreams are wont to be true, 
my fingers were relaxed by sleep, the threads 
fell from them, and I laid my head down upon the 
pillow to rest. There in vision clear I seemed to 
see a dolphin swimming through the wind-tossed 
waters ; and after the flood had cast it forth upon 
the thirsty sands, the wave, and at the same time 
life, abandoned the unhappy thing. Whatever it 
may mean, I fear ; and you — nor smile at my 
dreams, nor trust your arms except to a tranquil 
sea ! If you spare not yourself, spare the maid 
beloved by you, who never will be safe unless you 
are so ! I have hope none the less that the waves 



273 

T 



OVID 



spes tamen est fractis vicinae pacis in undis ; 

tu 1 placidas toto 2 pectore finde vias ! 
interea nanti, 3 quoniam freta pervia non sunt, 

leniat invisas littera missa moras. 210 

XX 

ACONTIUS CYDIPPAE 

Pone metum ! nihil hie iterum iurabis amanti ; 

promissam satis est te semel esse mihi. 
perlege ! discedat sic corpore languor ab isto, 

quod meus est ulla parte dolere dolor ! 
Quid pudor ante subit ? nam, sicut in aede Dianae, 5 

suspicor ingenuas erubuisse genas. 
coniugium pactamque fidem, non crimina posco ; 

debitus ut coniunx, non ut adulter amo. 
verba licet repetas, quae demptus ab arbore fetus 

pertulit ad castas me iaciente manus ; 10 
invenies illic, id te spondere, quod opto 

te potius, virgo, quam meminisse deam. 
nunc quoque idem timeo, sed idem tamen acrius 
illud ; 

adsumpsit vires auctaque flamma mora est, 
quique fuit numquam parvus, nunc tempore longo 15 
et spe, quam dederas tu mihi, crevit amor. 

1 U\ PGw. turn Pa. 2 toto P Vu : tuto O x s. 

3 nanti s : nandi P G 1 . 

a In the temple of Diana at Delos, Acontius threw before 
Cydippe an apple inscribed: "I swear by the sanctuary 



274 



THE HER01DES XX 



are broken and peace is near ; do you cleave their 
paths while placid with all your might ! Meanwhile, 
since the billows will not let the swimmer come, let 
the letter that 1 send you soften the hated hours of 
delay. 

XX 

ACONTIUS TO CYDIPPE 

Lay aside your fears ! here you will give no second 
oath to your lover ; that you have pledged yourself 
to me once is enough. a Read to the end, and so 
may the languor leave that body of yours ; that it 
feel pain in any part is pain to me ! 

5 Why do your blushes rise before you read ? — for 
I suspect that, just as in the temple of Diana, your 
modest cheeks have reddened. It is wedlock with 
you that I ask, and the faith you pledged me, not a 
crime ; as your destined husband, not as a deceiver, 
do I love. You may recall the words which the 
fruit I plucked from the tree and threw to you 
brought to your chaste hands ; you will find that 
in them you promise me what I pray that you, 
maiden, rather than the goddess, will remember. 
I am still as fearful as ever, but my fear has grown 
keener than it was ; for the flame of my love has 
waxed with being delayed, and taken on strength, 
and the passion that was never slight has now grown 
great, fed by long time and the hope that you 
had given. Hope you had given ; my ardent 

of Diana that I will wed Acontius," which she read aloud, 
thus inadvertently pledging herself. 



275 

T 2 



OVID 



spem mihi tu dedcrus, incus hie tibi credidit ardor. 

11011 potes hoc factum teste riegare dea. 
adfuit et, praesens ut erat, tua verba notavit 

et visa est mota dicta tulisse 1 coma. 20 
Deceptam dicas nostra te fraud e licebit, 

dum fraudis nostra e causa feratur amor, 
fraus raea quid petiit, nisi uti tibi iungerer, unum ? 

id te^ quod quereris, conciliare potest, 
non ego natura nec sum tarn callidus usu ; 25 

sollertem tu me, crede, puelha, facis. 
te mihi conpositis — siquid tamen egimus — a me 

adstrinxit verbis ingeniosus Amor, 
dictatis ab eo feci sponsalia verbis, 

consultoque fui iuris Amore vafer. 30 
sit fraus huic facto nomen, dicarque dolosns, 

si tamen est, quod ames, vfelle tenere dolus ! 
En, iterum scribo mittoque rogantia verba ! 

altera fraus haec est, quodque queraris habes. 
si noceo, quod amo, fateor, sine fine nocebo 35 

teque petam ; caveas tu licet, usque 2 petam. 
per gladios alii placitas rapnere pnellas ; 

scripta mihi caute 3 littera crimen erit ? 
di faciant, possim plures inponere nodos, 

ut tna sit nulla libera parte fides ! 40 
mille doli restant — clivo sndamns in imo ; 

ardor inexpertum nil sinet esse meus. 
sit dubium, possisne capi ; captabere certe. 

exitus in dis est, sed capiere tamen. 

1 tulisse PGu Plan.{?) : probasse «. 

2 usque s : ipse Pw : ipsa G Vs. 3 astute Bent. 

276 



THE HEROIDES XX 



heart put trust in you. You cannot deny that this 
was so — the goddess is my witness. She was there, 
and, present as she was, marked your words, and 
seemed, by the shaking of her locks, to have accepted 
them. 

21 I will give you leave to say you were deceived, 
and by wiles of mine, if only of those wiles my love 
be counted cause. What was the object of my 
wiles but the one thing — to be united with you ? 
The thing you complain of has power to join you 
to me. Neither by nature nor by practice am I 
so cunning ; believe me, maid, it is you who make 
me skilful. It was ingenious Love who bound you 
to me, with words — if I, indeed, have gained aught — 
that I myself drew up. In words dictated by him 
I made our betrothal bond ; Love was the lawyer 
that taught me knavery. Let wiles be the name 
you give my deed, and let me be called crafty — if 
only the wish to possess what one loves be craft ! 

33 Look, a seeond time I write, inditing words 
of entreaty ! A second stratagem is this, and you 
have good ground for complaint. If I wrong you 
by loving, I confess I shall wrong you for ever, 
and strive to win you ; though you shun my suit, 
I shall ever strive. With the sword have others 
stolen away the maids they loved ; shall this letter, 
discreetly written, be called a crime ? May the 
gods give me power to lay more bonds on you, so 
that your pledge may nowhere leave you free ! 
A thousand wiles remain — I am only perspiring 
at the foot of the steep ; my ardour will leave 
nothing unessayed. Grant 'tis doubtful whether 
you can be taken ; the taking shall at least be tried. 
The issue rests with the gods, but you will be 



277 



OVID 



ut partem effugias, non omnia retia falles, 45 

quae tibi, quam eredis, plura tetendit Amor, 
si non proficient artes, veniemus ad anna, 

inque 1 tui cupido rapta ferere siuu. 
non sum, qui soleam Paridis reprehendere factum, 

nec quemquam, qui vir, posset ut esse, fuit. 50 
nos quoque — sed taceo ! mors huius poena rapinae 

ut sit, erit, quam te non habuisse, minor, 
aut esses formosa minus, peterere modeste ; 

audaces facie cogimur esse tua. 
tu facis hoc oculique tui, quibus ignea cedunt 55 

sidera, qui flammae causa fuere meae ; 
hoc faciunt flavi crines et eburnea cervix, 

quaeque, precor, veniant in mea colla manus, 
et decor et vultus 2 sine rusticitate jiudentes, 

et, Thetidis qualis vix rear esse, pedes. 60 
cetera si possem laudare, beatior essem, 

nec dubito, totum quin sibi par sit opus, 
hac ego conpulsus, non est mirabile, forma 

.si pignus volui vocis habere tuae. 
Denique, dum captam tu te cogare fateri, 65 

insidiis esto capta puella meis. 
invidiam patiar ; passo sua praemia dentur. 

cur suus a tanto crimine fructus abest ? 
Hesionen Telamon, Briseida cepit Achilles; 

utraque victorem nempe secuta virum. 70 
quamlibet accuses et sis irata licebit, 

irata liceat dum mihi posse frui. 

1 inque MSS.: vique Pa. 2 motns DiltTiey. 

278 



THE HEROIDES XX 



taken none the less. Yon may evade a part, but you 
will not escape all the nets which Love, in greater 
number than you think, has stretched for you. If 
art will not serve, I shall resort to arms, and you 
will be seized and borne away in the embrace that 
longs for you. I am not the one to chicle Paris for 
what he did, nor any one who, to become a husband, 
has been a man." I, too — but I say nothing ! Allow 
that death is fit punishment for this theft of you, 
it will be less than not to have possessed you. 
Or you should have been less beautiful, would you 
be wooed by modest means ; 'tis by your charms I am 
driven to be bold. This is your work — your work, 
and that of your eyes, brighter than the fiery stars, 
and the cause of my burning love ; this is the work 
of your golden tresses and that ivory throat, and the 
hands which 1 pray to have clasp my neck, and your 
comely features, modest yet not rustic, and feet 
which Thetis' own methinks could scarcely equal. 
If I could praise the* rest of your charms, I should be 
happier; yet I doubt not that the work is like in' all 
its parts. Compelled by beauty such as this, it is no 
cause for marvel if I wished the pledge of your word. 

66 In fine, so only you are forced to confess your- 
self caught, be, if you will, a maid caught by my 
treachery. The reproach I will endure — only let 
him who endures have his just reward. Why should 
so great a charge lack its due profit ? Telamon 
won Hesione, Briseis was taken by Achilles ; each of 
a surety followed the victor as her lord. You may 
chide and be angry as much as you will, if only you 
let me enjoy you while you are angry. 1 who cause 

. a ii yj r " j s usec \ ; n two senses — ' ' husband " and " man of 
courage." 

279 



OVID 



idem, qui facimus, factam tenuabimus iram, 

copia placandi sit modo parva tui. 
ante tuos liceat flentem 1 consistere vultus 75 

et liceat lacrimis addere verba sua, 2 
utque solent famuli, cum verbera saeva verentur, 

tendere submissas ad tua crura manus ! 
ignoras tua iura ; voca ! cur arguor absens ? 

iamdudum dominae more venire iube. 80 
ipsa meos scindas licet imperiosa capillos, 

oraque sint digitis livida nostra tuis. 
omnia perpetiar ; tantum fortasse timebo, 

corpore laedatur ne manus ista raeo. 
Sed neque conpedibus nec me conpesce catenis — 85 

servabor firmo vinctus amore tui ! 
cum bene se quantumque volet satiaverit ira, 

ipsa tibi dices : " quam patienter amat ! " - 
ipsa tibi dices, ubi videris omnia ferre : 

"tarn bene qui servit, serviataste mihi ! " 90 
nunc reus infelix absens agor, et mea, cum sit 

optima, non ullo causa tuente perit. 
Hoc quoque — quantumvis 3 sit scriptum iniuria 
nostrum, 

quod de me solo, nempe queraris habes. 
non meruit falli mecum quoque Delia ; si non 95 

vis mihi promissum reddere, redde deae. 
adfuit et vidit, cum tn decepta l-ubebas, 

et vocem memori condidit aure tuam. 
omina re careant ! nihil est violentius ilia, 

cum sua, quod nolim, numina laesa videt. 100 

1 fle7item G Vs Plan.: flentes P l : flentem liceat u<. 

2 sua Pa.: sni P : suis G: ineis co : tuis s. 

3 quantumvis Pa. at first : quod tu via G Pa. 

280 



THE HEROIDES XX 



it will likewise assuage the wrath I stirred, let me 
but have a slight ehance of appeasing you. Let 
me have leave to stand weeping before your face, 
and my tears have leave to add their own speech ; 
and let me, like a slave in fear of bitter stripes, 
stretch out submissive hands to touch your feet ! 
You know not your own right ; eall me ! Why 
am I accused in absence ? Bid me come, forthwith, 
after the manner of a mistress. With your own 
imperious hand you may tear my hair, and make my 
face livid with your fingers. I will endure all ; my 
only fear perhaps will be lest that hand of yours be 
bruised on me. 

85 But bind me not with shackles nor with 
chains — I shall be kept in bonds by unyielding love 
for you. When your anger shall have had full 
course, and is sated well, you will say to yourself : 
" How enduring is his love ! " You will say to your- 
self, when you have seen me bearing all : " He who 
is a slave so well, let him be slave to me !" Now, 
unhappy, I am arraigned in my absence, and my 
cause, though excellent, is lost because no one 
appears for me. 

93 This further — however much that writing of 
mine was a wrong to you, it is not I alone, you 
must know, of whom you have cause to complain. 
She of*Delos was not deserving of betrayal with 
me ; if faith with me you cannot keep, keep faith 
with the goddess. She was present and saw when 
you blnshed at being ensnared, and stored away 
your word in a remembering ear. May your 
omens be groundless ! Nothing is more violent 
than she when she sees — what I hope will not 
be ! — her godhead wronged. The boar of Calydon 

281 



OVID 



testis erit Calydonis aper, sic saevus, ut illo 

sit magis in natum saeva reperta parens, 
testis et Actaeon, quondum fera creditus illis, 

ipse dedit leto cum quibus ante feras ; 
quaeque superba parens saxo per corpus oborto 105 

nunc quoque Mygdonia flebilis adstat hnmo. 
Ei mihi ! Cydippe, timeo tibi dicere verum, 

ne videar causa falsa monere mea ; 
dicendum tamen est. hoc est, 1 mihi crede, quod 
aegra 

ipso nubendi tempore saepe iaces. 110 
consulit ipsa tibi, neu sis periura, laborat, 

et salvam salva te cupit esse fide, 
inde fit ut, quotiens existere perfida temptas, 

peccatum totiens corrigat ilia tuum. 
parce movere feros animosae virginis arcus ; 115 

mitis adhuc fieri, si patiare, potest, 
parce, precor, teneros corrumpere febribus artus ; 

servetur facies ista fruenda mihi. 
serventur vultus ad nostra incendia nati, 

quique subest niveo lenis 2 in ore rubor. 120 
hostibus et siquis, ne fias nostra, repugnat, 

sic sit ut invalida te solet esse mihi ! 
torqueor ex aequo vel te nubente vel aegra 

dicere nec possum, quid minus ipse velim ; 
maceror interdum, quod sim tibi causa dolenjdi 125 

teque mea laedi calliditate puto. 
in caput ut nostrum dominae periuria quaeso 

eveniant ; poena tuta sit ilia mea ! 

1 tu Ehw. 2 lenis Ps : levis o> : laetns s. 



° Meleager, whose mother Althaea's anger was inspired by 
Diana. 

* Niobe, with the children of whom she boasted, was slain 
282 



THE HEROIDES XX 



will be my witness — fierce, yet so that a mother a 
was found to be fiercer than he against her own 
son. Actaeon, too, will witness, once on a time 
thought a wild beast by those with whom himself 
had given wild beasts to deatli ; and the arrogant 
mother, her body turned to rock, who still sits 
weeping on Mygdonian soil. 6 

507 Alas me ! Cydippe, I fear to tell you the truth, 
lest I seem to warn you falsely, for the sake of my 
plea ; yet tell it I must. This is the reason, believe 
me, why you oft lie ill on the eve of marriage. 
It is the goddess herself, looking to your good, 
and striving to keep you from a false oath ; she 
wishes you kept whole by the keeping whole of 
your faith. This is the reason why, as oft as 
you attempt to break your oath, she corrects your 
sin. Cease to invite forth the cruel bow of the 
spirited virgin ; she still may be appeased, if only you 
allow. Cease, I entreat, to waste with fevers your 
tender limbs ; preserve those charms of yours for me 
to enjoy. Preserve those features that were born to 
kindle my love, and the gentle blush that rises to 
grace your snowy cheek. May my enemies, and any 
who would keep you from my arms, so fare as I when 
you are ill ! 1 am alike in torment whether you 
wed, or whether you are ill, nor can I say which I 
should wish the less ; at times I waste with grief 
at thought that I may be cause of pain to you, and 
my wiles the cause of your wounds. May the false 
swearing of my lady come upon my head, I pray ; 
mine be the penalty, and she thus be safe ! 

by Diana and Apollo. A " weeping Niobe " rock was pointed 
out in Mygdonia, a province of Phrygia. 
c The day was often postponed. 

283 



OVID 



Ne tamen ignorem, quid agas, ad limina crebro 

anxius hue illuc dissimulauter eo ; 130 
subseqnor ancillam furtim famul unique requirens, 

profuerint somni quid tibi quidve cibi. 
me miserum, quod non medicoruiii iussa ministro, 

effingoque manus, insideoque toro ! 
et rursus miserum, quod me procul hide remoto, 135 

quera mininie veil em, forsitan alter adest ! 
ille nianus istas effingit, et adsidet aegrae 

invisus superis cum superisque mihi, 
dumque suo temptat salientem pollice venaru, 

Candida per causam bracchia saepe tenet, 140 
contrectatque sinus, et forsitan oscula hmgit. 

officio merces plenior ista suo est ! 
Quis tibi permisit nostras praecerpere messes ? 

ad spes alterius quis tibi fecit iter ? 
iste sinus meus est ! mea turpiter oscula sumis ! 145 

a mihi promisso corpore tolle nianus ! 
inprobe, tolle nianus ! quani tangis, nostra futura 
est ; 

postmodo si facies istud, adulter eris. 
elige de vacuis quani non sibi vindicet alter ; 

si nescis, dominum res habet ista suum. 150 
nee mihi credideris — recitetur formula pacti ; 

neu falsam dicas esse, fac ipsa legat ! 
alterius thalamo, tibi nos, tibi dicimus, exi ! 

quid facis hie ? exi ! non vacat iste torus ! 
284 



THE HEROIDES XX 



129 Nevertheless, that I may not be ignorant of how 
you tare, now here, now there, I oft walk anxiously 
in secret before your door ; I follow stealthily 
the maid-slave and the lackey, asking what change 
for good your sleep has brought, or what your 
food. Ah me, wretched, that I may not be the 
one to carry out the bidding of your doctors," 
and may not stroke your hands and sit at the side of 
your bed ! and again wretched, because when I am 
far removed from you, perhaps that other, he whom 
I least could wish, is with you ! He is the one 
to stroke those dear hands, and to sit by you while 
ill, hated by me and by the gods above — and 
while he feels with his thumb your throbbing 
artery, he oft. makes this the excuse for holding 
your fair, white arm, and touches your bosom, and, it 
may be, kisses you. A hire like this is too great for 
the service given ! 

143 Who gave you leave to reap my harvests before 
me ? Who laid open the road for you to enter 
upon another's hopes ? That bosom is mine ! mine 
are the kisses you take ! Away with your hands 
from the body pledged to me ! Scoundrel, away 
with your hands ! She whom you touch is to be 
mine ; henceforth, if you do that, you will be 
adulterous. Choose from those who are free one 
whom another does not claim ; if you do not know, 
those goods have a master of their own. Nor need 
you take my word — let the formula of our pact be 
recited ; and, lest you say 'tis false, have her read 
it herself! Out with you from another's chamber, 
out with you, I say ! What are you doing there ? 
Out ! That couch is not free ! Because you, too, 
" Administer the prescriptions. 

23 5 



OVID 



nam quod habes et tu gemini vei'ba altera pacti, 1 55 

non erit idcirco par tua causa ineae. 
haec mihi se pepigit, pater hane tibi, primus 
ab ilia ; 

sed propior certe quam pater ipsa sibi est. 
promisit pater hanc, haec et iuravit amanti ; 

ille homines, haec est testificata deam. 160 
hie metuit mendax, 1 haec et periura vocari ; 

an dubitas, hie sit maior an ille metus ? 
denique, ut amborum conferre pericula possis, 

respice ad eventus — haec cubat, ille valet, 
nos quoque dissimili certamina mente subimus ; 165 

nec spes par nobis nec timor aequus adest. 
tu petis ex tuto ; gravior mihi morte repulsa est, 

idque ego iam, quod tu forsan amabis, amo. 
si tibi iustitiae, si recti cura fuisset, 

cedere debueras ignibus ipse meis. 170 
Nunc, quoniam ferus hie pro causa pugnat iniqua, 

ad quid, Cydippe, littera nostra redit ? 
hie facit ut iaceas et sis suspecta Dianae ; 

hunc tu, si sapias, limen adire vetes. 
hoc faciente subis tam saeva pericula vitae — 175 

atque utinam pro te, qui movet ilia, cadat ! 
quern si reppuleris, nec, quern dea damnat, amaris, 

tu tunc continuo, certe ego salvus ero. 
siste metum, virgo ! stabili potiere salute, 

fac modo polliciti conscia templa colas ; 180 
non bove mactato caelestia numina gaudent, 

sed, quae praestanda est et sine teste, fide. 

1 So P S G \ t oj : ille timet mendax Dilthey P l in erasure. 



THE HEROIDES XX 



have the words of a second pact, the twin of mine, 
your case will not on that account be equal with 
mine. She promised herself to me, her father her 
to } r ou ; he is first after her, but surely she is 
nearer to herself than her father is. Her father 
but gave promise of her, while she, too, made 
oath — to her lover ; he called men to witness, she 
a goddess. He fears to be called false, she to be 
called forsworn also ; do you doubt which — this or 
that — is the greater fear ? In a word, even grant 
you could compare their hazards, regard the issue — 
for she lies ill, and he is strong. You and I, too, are 
entering upon a contest with different minds ; our 
hopes are not equal, nor are our fears the same. 
Your suit is without risk ; for me, repulse is heavier 
than death, and I already love her whom you, 
perhaps, will come to love. If you had cared for 
justice, or cared for what was right, you yourself 
should have given my passion the way. 

171 Now, since his hard heart persists in its unjust 
course, Cydippe, to what conclusion does my letter 
come ? It is he who is the cause of your lying 
ill and under suspicion of Diana ; he is the one 
you would forbid your doors, if you were wise. 
It is his doing that you are facing such dire 
hazards of life — and would that he who causes them 
might perish in your place ! If you shall have 
repulsed him and refused to love one the goddess 
damns, then straightway you — and I assuredlv — 
will be whole. Stay your fears, maiden ! You will 
possess abiding health, if only you honour the 
shrine that is witness of your pledge ; not by slain 
oxen are the spirits of heaven made glad, but 
by good faith, which should be kept even though 

287 



OVID 



ut valeant aline, ferrum patiuntur et ignes, 

fert aliis tristeni sucus amarus openi. 
nil opus est istis ; tantum periuria vita 185 

teque simul serva meque datamque fidem ! 
praeteritae veniam dabit ignorantia culpa e — 

exciderant animo foedera lecta tuo. 
admonita es modo voce mea cum 1 casibus istis, 

quos, quotiens temptas fallere, ferre soles. 190 
his quoque vitatis in partu nempe rogabis, 

ut tibi luciferas adferat ilia maims ? 
audiet haec — repetens quae sunt audita, requiret, 

iste tibi de quo coniuge partus eat. 
promittes votum — scit te promittere falso : 195 

iurabis — scit te fallere posse deos ! 
Non agitur de me ; cura maiore laboro. 

anxia sunt vitae pectora nostra tuae. 
cur modo te dubiam pavidi flevere parentes, 

ignaros culpae quos facis esse tuae ? 200 
et cur ignorent ? matri licet omnia narres. 

nil tua, Cydippe, facta ruboris 2 babent. 
ordine fac referas ut sis mihi cognita primum 

sacra pliaretratae dum facit ipsa deae ; 
ut te conspecta subito, si forte notasti, 205 

restiterim fixis in tua membra genis ; 
et, te dum nimium miror, nota certa furoris, 

deciderint umero pallia lapsa meo 3 ; 
postmodo nescio qua venisse volubile malum, 

verba ferens doctis insidiosa notis, 210 

1 cum Hous.: modo MSS. - pudoris s. 

3 humeris . . . nieis Plnn.{?) JJTerX*. Secll. Ehw. 

" A frequent epithet of Diana. 

288 



THE HEROIDES XX 



without witness. To win their health, some maids 
submit to steel and fire ; to others, bitter juices 
bring their gloomy aid. There is no need of these ; 
only shun false oaths, preserve the. pledg'e you have 
given — and so yourself, and me ! Excuse for past 
offence your ignorance will supply — the agreement 
you read had fallen from your mind. You have 
but now been admonished not only by word of 
mine, but as well by those mishaps of health you 
are wont to suffer as oft as you try to evade your 
promise. Even if you escape these ills, in child-birth 
will you dare pray for aid from her light-bringing a 
hands ? She will hear these words — and then, 
recalling what she has heard, will ask of you from 
what husband eome those Jiangs. You will promise 
a votive gift — she knows your promises are false ; 
you will make oath — she knows you ean deceive 
the gods ! 

197 'Tis not a matter of myself ; the care I labour 
with is greater. It is concern for your life that 
fills my heart. Why, but now when your life was 
in doubt, did your frightened parents weep with 
fear, whom you keep ignorant of your crime ? And 
why should they be ignorant ? — you could tell your 
mother all. What you have done, Cydippe, needs 
no blush. See you relate in order how you first 
became known to me, while she was herself making 
sacrifice to the goddess of the quiver; how at sight 
of you, if perchance you noticed, I straight stood 
still with eyes fixed on your charms ; and how, 
while I gazed on you too eagerly — sure mark of 
love's madness — my cloak slipped from my shoulder 
and fell ; how, after that, in some way came the 
rolling apple, with its treacherous words in clever 

289 

u 



OVID 



quod quia sit lectum sancta praesente Diana, 

esse tuam vinetani n limine teste fidehi 
ne tamen ignoret, seripti sententia quae sit, 

leeta tibi quondam nunc quoque verba refer. 
" nube, precor/' dicet, "cui te bona minima 

iungunt ; 215 

quern fore iurasti, sit gener ille mibi. 
quisquis is est, placeat, quoniam placet ante Dianae ! " 

talis erit mater, si modo mater erit. 
Sed tamen ut quaerat 1 quis sim qualisque, videto. 

inveniet vobis consuluisse deam. 220 
insula, Coryciis quondam celeberrima nymphis, 

cingitur Aegaeo, nomine Cea, mari. 
ilia mihi patria est ; nee, si generosa probatis 

nomina, despectis arguor ortus avis, 
sunt et opes nobis, sunt et sine crimine mores ; 225 

amplius utque nihil, me tibi iungit Amor, 
appeteres talem vel non iurata maritum ; 

iuratae vel non talis babendus erat. 
Haec tibi me in somnis iaculatrix scribere Phoebe ; 

haec tibi me vigilem scribere iussit Amor ; 230 
e quibus alterius mihi iam nocuere sagittae, 

alterius noceant ne tibi tela, cave ! 
iuncta salus nostra est — miserere meique tuique ; 

quid dubitas imam ferre duobus opem ? 
quod si contigerit, cum iam data signa sonabunt, 235 

tinctaque votivo sanguine Delos erit, 
1 ut quaerat s : et quaerat co. 

" For the beginning of the eeremonj'. 

* The sacrifices attendant upon Acontius' marriage to 
Cydlppe. 



290 



THE HEROIDES XX 



character ; and how, because they were read in 
holy Diana's presence, you were bound by a pledge 
with deity to witness. For fear that after all she 
may not know the import of the writing, repeat now 
again to her the words once read by you. "Wed, 
I pray," she will say, " him to whom the good gods 
join you ; the one you swore should be, let be my 
son-in-law. Whoever he is, let him be our choice, 
since he was Diana's choice before ! " Such will be 
your mother's word, if only she is a mother. 

219 And yet, see that she seeks out who I am, and 
of what ways. She will find that the goddess had 
you and yours at heart. An isle once thronged by 
the Coryeian nymphs is girdled by the Aegean sea ; 
its name is Cea. That is the land of my fathers ; 
nor, if you look with favour on high-born names, 
am I to be charged with birth from grandsires of no 
repute. We have wealth, too, and we have a name 
above reproach ; and, though there were nothing 
else, I am bound to you by Love. You would aspire 
to such a husband even though you had not sworn ; 
now that you have sworn, even though he were not 
such, you should accept him. 

22y These words Phoebe, she of the darts, bade 
me in my dreams to write you ; these words in my 
waking hours I.ove bade me write. The arrows 
of the one of them have already wounded me ; 
that the darts of the other wound not you, take 
heed! Your safety is joined with mine — have 
compassion on me and on yourself ; why hesitate to 
ajd us both at once ? If you shall do this, in the 
day when the sounding signals" will be given and 
Delos be stained with votive blood, & a golden image 



291 

u 2 



OVID 



aurea ponetur mali felicis imago, 

causaque versiculis scripta duobus erit : 

EFFIGIE POMI TESTATUR ACONTIUS 11UIUS 

QUAE FUERINT IN EO SCRIPTA FUISSE RATA. 240 

Longior infirmum ne lasset epistula corpus 
clausaque consueto sit sibi fine : vale ! 



XXI 

CVDIPPE ACONTIO 

Pertimui, script um que tuum sine murmure legi, 

iuraret ne quos inscia lingua deos. 
et puto captasses iterum, nisi, ut ipse fateris, 

promissam scires me satis esse semel. 
nec lectura ful, sed, si tibi dura fuissem, 5 

aucta foret saevae forsitan ira deae. 
omnia cum faciam, cum dem pia turn Dianae, 

ilia tamen iusta plus tibi parte favet, 
utque cupis credi, memori te vindicat ira ; 

talis in Hippolyto vix fuit ilia suo. 10 
at melius virgo favisset virginis annis, 

quos vereor paucos ne velit esse mihi. 1 
Languor enim causis non apparentibus haeret ; 

adiuvor et nulla fessa medentis ope. 
quam tibi nunc gracilem vix haec rescribere 

quamque 15 

pallida vix cubito membra levare putas ? 

1 Good MSS. and Plan, do not contain 13 — end. 

a The chaste favourite of the goddess, courted by Phaedra, 
who compassed his death because of his refusal. See iv. 



292 



THE HERO IDES XXI 



of the blessed apple shall be offered up, and the cause 
of its offering shall be set forth in verses twain : 

I3V THIS IMAGE OF THE APPLE DOTH ACOXTIUS DECLARE 
THAT WHAT ONCE WAS WRITTEN ON IT NOW HATH 
HAD FULFILMENT FAIR. 

That too long a letter may not weary your 
weakened frame, and that it may close with the 
aeeustomed end : fare well ! 

XXI 

CvDIPPE TO AcONTIUS 

All fearful, I read what you wrote without so 
much as a murmur, lest my tongue unwittingly 
might swear by some divinity. And I believe you 
would have tried to snare me a seeond time, did 
you not know, as you yourself eonfess, that one 
pledge from me was enough. I should not have 
read at all ; but had I been hard with you, the 
anger of the eruel goddess might have grown. 
Though I clo everything, though 1 offer duteous 
ineense to Diana, she none the less favours you 
more than your due, and, as you are eager for me 
to believe, avenges you with unforgetting anger ; 
scarce was she sueh toward her own Hippolytus.® 
Yet the maiden goddess had done better to favour 
the years of a maiden like me — years which I fear 
she wishes few for me. 

13 For the languor clings to me, for causes that do 
not appear ; worn out, I find no help in the 
physician's art. How thin and wasted am I now, 
think you, searee able to write this answer to you ? 



293 



OVID 



nunc timor accedit, ne quis nisi conscia nutrix 

colloquii nobis sentiat esse vices, 
ante fores sedet haec quid agamque rogantibus intus, 

ut passim tuto scribere, "dormit," ait. 20 
mox, ubi, secreti longi causa optima, somnns 

credibilis tarda desinit esse mora, 
iamque venire videt qnos non admittere durum est, 

excreat et ficta dat mihi signa nota. 
sicut erant, pi*opei'ans verba inperfecta relinquo, 25 

et tegitur trepido littera coepta 1 sinu. 
inde meos digitos iterum repetita fatigat ; 

qnantus sit nobis adspicis ipse labor, 
quo peream si dignus eras, ut vera loqnamur ; 

sed melior iusto quamque mereris ego. 30 
Ergo te propter totiens incerta salutis 

commentis poenas doque dedique tnis ? 
haec nobis formae te laudatore superbae 

contingit merces ? et placuisse nocet ? 
si tibi deformis, quod mallem, visa fuissem, 35 

culpatum nulla corpus egeret ope ; 
nunc landata gemo, nunc me certamine vestro 

perditis, et proprio vulneror ipsa bono, 
dum neque tu cedis, nec se putat ille secundum, 

tn votis obstas illins, ille tuis. 40 
ipsa velut navis iactor quam certus in altum 

propellit Boreas, aestus et unda refert, 
1 cauta MSS.: coepta Dilthey. 

294 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



and how pale the body I scarce can raise upon 
my arm ? And now I feci an added fear, lest 
someone besides the nurse who shares my secret 
may see that we are interchanging words. She 
sits before the door, and when they ask how I 
do within, answers, "She sleeps," that I may write 
in safety. Presently, when sleep, the excellent 
exeuse for my long retreat, no longer wins belief 
because I tarry so, and now she sees those coming 
whom not to admit is hard, she clears her throat 
and thus gives me the sign agreed upon. Just 
as they are, in haste I leave my words un- 
finished, and the letter I have begun is hid in my 
trembling bosom. Taken thence, a second time it 
fatigues my fingers ; how great the toil to me, 
yourself can see. May I perish if, to speak truth, 
you were worthy of it ; but I am kinder than is just 
or you deserve. 

31 So, then, 'tis on your account that I am so 
many times uncertain of health, and 'tis for your 
lying tricks that I am and have been punished ? 
Is this the reward that falls to my beauty, proud 
in your praise ? Must I suffer for having pleased ? 
If I had seemed misshapen to you — and would 1 
had ! — you would have thought ill of my body, and 
now it would need no help ; but I met with 
praise, and now I groan ; now you two with your 
strife are my despair, and my own beauty itself 
wounds me. While neither you yield to him nor 
he deems him second to you, you hinder his 
prayers, he hinders yours. I myself am tossed like 
a ship which steadfast Boreas drives out into the 
deep, and tide and wave bring back, and when the 



295 



OVID 



cumque dies caris optata parentibus instut, 

inmodieus pariter corporis ardor adest — 
ei mihi, couiugii tempus crudelis ad ipsum 45 

Persephone nostras pulsat acerba fores ! 
iam pudet, et timeo, qnamvis mihi conscia non sim, 

offensos videar ne meruisse deos. 
accidere haec aliquis casn contendit, at alter 

acceptum superis hunc negat esse virnm ; 50 
neve nihil credas in te quoque dicere famam, 

facta veneficiis pars putat ista tuis. 
causa latet, mala nostra patent ; vos pace movetis 

aspera submota proelia, plector ego ! 
Die mihi 1 nunc, solitoque tibi ne decipe more : 55 

quid facies odio, sic ubi amore noces ? 
si laedis, quod amas, hostem sapienter amabis — 

rae, precor, ut serves, perdere velle velis ! 
aut tibi iam nulla est speratae cura puellae, 

quam ferns indigna tabe perire sinis, 60 
ant, dea si frustra pro me tibi saeva rogatur, 

quid mihi te iactas ? gratia nulla tua est ! 
elige, qnid fingas : non vis placare Dianam — 

inmemor es nostri ; non potes — ilia tui est ! 
Vel nnmquam mallem vel non mihi tempore in 
illo G5 

esset in Aegaeis cognita Delos aquis ! 
tunc mea difficili deducta est aequore navis, 

et fuit ad coeptas hora sinistra vias. 
quo pede processi ! qno me pede limine movi ! 

pi eta citae tetigi quo pede texta ratis ! 70 

1 dicam MSS.: die a! Pa.: die mihi Bent. 



296 



a Eager and spirited. 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



day longed for by my parents dear draws nigh, at 
the same time unmeasured burning seizes on my 
frame — ah me, at the very time of marriage cruel 
Persephone knocks at my door before her day ! 
I already am shamed, and in fear, though I feel 
no guilt within, lest I appear to have merited the 
displeasure of the gods. One contends that my 
affliction is the work of chance ; another says that 
my destined husband finds not favour with the 
gods ; and, lest you think yourself untouched by 
what men say, there are also some who think you 
the eause, by poisonous arts. Their source is hidden, 
but my ills are clear to see ; you two stir up fierce 
strife and banish peace, and the blows are mine ! 

55 Tell me now, and deceive me not in your 
wonted way : what will you do from hatred, when 
you harm me so from love ? If you injure one you 
love, 'twill be reason to love your foe — to save me, 
I pray you, will to wish my doom ! Either you care 
no longer for the hoped-for maid, whom with hard 
heart you are letting waste away to an unworthy 
death, or if in vain you beseech for me the eruel 
goddess, why boast yourself to me? — you have no 
favour with her! Choose which case you will : you 
do not wish to placate Diana — you have forgotten 
me ; you have no power with her — 'tis she has 
forgotten you ! 

05 I would I had either never — or not at that 
time — known Delos in the Aegean waters ! That 
was the time my ship set forth on a difficult sea, and 
I entered on a voyage in ill-omened hour. With 
what step" I came forth ! With what step I started 
from my threshold ! The painted deck of the 
swift ship — with what step I trod it ! Twice, 



297 



OVID 



bis tamen adverso redierunt carbasa vento — 

mention a demens ! ille secundus erat ! 
ille secundus erat qui me referebat euntem, 

quique parum felix inpediebat iter, 
atque utinam constans contra mea vela fuissct — 75 

sed stultum est venti de levitate queri. 
Mota loci fama properabam visere Delon 

et facere ignava puppe videbar iter, 
quam saepe ut tardis feci convicia remis, 

questaque sum vento lintea parca dari ! 80 
et iam transieram Myconon, iam Tenon et Andron, 

inqiie meis oculis Candida Delos erat; 
quam procul ut vidi, "quid me fugis, insula," dixi, 

"laberis in magno numquid, ut ante, mari ?" 
Institeram terra e, cum iam prope luce peracta 85 

demere purpureis sol iuga vellet equis. 
quos idem solitos postquam revocavit ad ortus, 

comuntur nostrae matre iubente comae, 
ipsa dedit gemmas digitis et crinibus aurum, 

et vestes umeris induit ipsa meis. 90 
protinus egressae superis, quibus insula sacra est, 1 

flava salutatis tura merumque damns ; 
dumque parens aras votivo sanguine tingit, 

festaque fumosis ingerit exta focis, 
sedula me nutrix alias quoque ducit in aedes, 95 

erramusque vago per loca sacra pede. 
et modo porticibus spatior modo munera regum 

miror et in cunctis stantia signa locis ; 

1 grata est Ps Bent. 

298 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



none the less, my canvas put about before an 
adverse wind — ah, senseless that I am, I lie ! — a 
favouring wind was that ! A favouring wind it was 
that brought me back from my going, and hindered 
the way that had little happiness for me. Ah, would 
it had been constant against my sails — but it is 
foolish to complain of fickle winds. 

77 Moved by the fame of the place, I was in eager 
haste to visit Delos, and the craft in which I sailed 
seemed spiritless. How oft did I chide the oars for 
being slow, and complain that sparing canvas was 
given to the wind ! And now I had passed Myconos, 
now Tenos and Andros, and Delos gleamed a before 
my eyes. When I beheld it from afar, " Why dost 
thou fly from me, O isle ? " I cried ; "art thou afloat 
in the great sea, as in days of yore ? " 

S5 I had set foot upon land ; the light was almost 
gone, and the sun was making ready to take their 
yokes from his shining steeds. When he has like- 
wise called them once more to their accustomed 
rising, my hair is dressed at the bidding of my 
mother. With her own hand she sets gems upon 
my fingers and gold in my tresses, and with her own 
hand places the robes about my shoulders. Straight- 
way setting forth, we greet the deities to whom the 
isle is consecrate, and offer up the golden incense 
and the wine ; and while my mother stains the 
altars with votive blood, and piles the solemn entrails 
on the smoking altar-flames, my busy nurse conducts 
me to other temples also, and we stray with wander- 
ing step about the holy precincts. *And now I walk 
in the porticoes, now look with wonder on the gifts 
of kings, and the statues standing everywhere ; I 
" The Creek islands are masses of limestone. 

299 



OVID 



miror et inrmmeris structam de eornibus aram, 

et de qua pariens arbore nixa dea est, 100 
et quae praeterea — neque enim meminive libetve 

quidquid ibi vidi dieere — Delos habet. 
Forsitan haec spectans a te spectabar, Aconti, 

visaque simplicitas est mea posse capi. 
in templum redeo gradibus sublime Diana e — 105 

tutior hoc eequis debuit esse locus ? 
mittitur ante pedes malum cum carmine tali — 

ei mi hi, inravi nunc quoque paene tibi ! 
sustulit hoc nutrix mirataque "perlege ! " dixit. 

insidias legi, magne poeta, tuas ! 110 
nomine coniugii dicto confusa pudore, 

sensi me totis erubuisse genis, 
luminaque in gremio veluti defixa tenebam — 

lumina propositi facta ministra tui. 
inprobe, quid gaudes ? aut quae tibi gloria parta 

est? 115 

quidve vir elusa virgin e laudis habes ? 
non ego constiteram sumpta peltata securi, 

qualis in Iliaco Penthesilea solo ; 
nullus Amazonio caelatus balteus auro, 

sicut ab Hippolyte, praeda relata tibi est. 120 
verba quid exultas tua si mihi verba dederunt, 

sumque parum prudens capta jmella dolis ? 
Cydippen pomum, pomum Schoeneida cejiit ; 

tu nunc Hijipomenes scilicet alter eris ! 

A great wonder in its time ; built by Apollo of the horns 
of his sister's saerifieial victims. 

b Latona, mother of Apollo and Diana. 

c Penthesilea and Hippolyte were queens of the Amazons ; 



300 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



look with wonder, too, on the altar bnilt of countless 
horns/ and the tree that stayed the goddess in her 
throes/ and all things else that Delos holds — for 
memory would not serve, nor mood allow, to tell of 
all I looked on there. 

103 Perhaps, thus gazing, I was gazed upon by you, 
Acontius, and my simple nature seemed an easy prey. 
I return to Diana's temple, with its lofty approach 
of steps — ought any place to be safer than this ? — 
when there is thrown before my feet an apple with 
this verse that follows — ah me, now again I almost 
made oath to you ! Nurse took it up, looked in 
amaze, and " Read it through ! " she said. I read 
your treacherous verse, O mighty poet ! At mention 
of the name of wedlock I was confused and shamed, 
and felt the blushes cover all my face, and my eyes 
I kept upon my bosom as if fastened there — those 
e}*es that were made ministers to your intent. 
Wretch, why rejoice ? or what glory have you 
gained ? or what praise have you won, a man, by 
playing on a maid ? I did not present myself before 
you with buckler and axe in hand, like a Penthesilea 
on the soil of Ilion ; no sword-girdle, chased with 
Amazonian gold, was offered you for spoil by me, as 
by some Hippolyte." Why exult if your words de- 
ceived me, and I, a girl of little wisdom, was taken 
by your wiles ? Cydippe was snared by the apple, an 
apple snared Schoeneus' child ; d you now of a truth 
will be a second Hippomenes ! Yet had it been 

the former was slain by Achilles at Troy, the latter's sword- 
belt was won by Hercules as his sixth labour, and she was 
given by him in marriage to Theseus for his aid. 

d Atalanta, who lost the race by stopping for the golden 
apples dropped by Hippomenes. 



301 



OVID 



at fuerat melius, si te puer iste tenebat, 125 

quern tu nescio quas dicis habere faces, 1 
more bonis solito spem non corrumpere fraude ; 

exoranda tibi, non capienda fui ! 
Cur, me cum peteres, ea non profitenda putabas, 

propter quae nobis ipse petendus eras ? 130 
cogere cur potius quam persuadere volebas, 

si poteram audita condicione capi ? 
quid tibi nunc prodest iurandi formula iuris 

linguaque praesentem testifieata deam ? 
quae iurat, mens est. nil coniuravimus ilia ; 135 

ilia fidem dictis addere sola potest, 
consilium prudensque animi sententia iurat, 

et nisi iudicii vincula nulla valent. 
si tibi coniugium volui promittere nostrum, 

exige polliciti debita iura tori ; 140 
sed si nil dedimus praeter sine pectore vocem, 

verba suis frustra viribus orba tenes. 
non ego iuravi — legi iurantia verba ; 

vir mihi non isto more legendus eras, 
decipe sic alias — succedat epistula porno ! 145 

si valet hoc, magnas ditibus 2 aufer opes ; 
fac iurent reges sua se tibi regna daturos, 

sitque tuum toto quidqnid in orbe placet ! 
maior es hoe ipsa multo, mihi crede, Diana, 

si tua tarn praesens littera numen habet. 150 
Cum tamen haec dixi, cum me tibi firnia negavi, 

cum bene promissi causa peracta mei est, 
confiteor, timeo saevae Latoidos iram 

et corpus laedi suspicor inde meum. 

1 vices Dilthey Ehw. 2 ditibus Hein.: divilis J\fSS. 
102 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



better for you — if that boy really held you captive 
who you say has certain torches — to do as good men 
are wont, and not cheat your hope by dealing falsely ; 
you should have won me by persuasion, not taken 
me whether or no ! 

129 Why, when you sought my hand, did you not 
think worth declaring those things that made your 
own hand worth my seeking ? Why did you wish 
to compel me rather than persuade, if I could be 
Avon by listening to your suit ? Of what avail 
to yoti now the formal words of an oath, and the 
tongue that called on present deity to witness ? It 
is the mind that swears, and I have taken no oath 
with that; it alone can lend good faith to words. 
It is counsel and the prudent reasoning of the soul 
that swear, and, except the bonds of the judgment, 
none avail. If I have willed to pledge my hand to you, 
exact the due rights of the promised marriage-bed ; 
but if I have given you naught but my voice, without 
my heart, you possess in vain but words without a 
force of their own. I took no oath — I read words 
that formed an oath ; that was no way for you to be 
chosen to husband by me. Deceive thus other maids 
— let a letter follow an apple ! If this plan holds, 
win away their great wealth from the rich ; make 
kings take oath to give their thrones to you, and let 
whatsoever pleases you in all the world be yours ! 
You are much greater in this, believe me, than 
Diana's self, if your written word has in it such 
present deity. 

151 Nevertheless, after saying this, after firmly re- 
fusing myself to you, after having finished pleading 
the cause of my promise to you, I confess I fear the 
anger of Leto's eruel daughter and suspect that from 

303 



OVID 



nam quare, quotiens socialia sacra parantur, 155 

nupturae totiens languida membra cadunt ? 
ter mihi iam venieus positas Hymenaeus ad aras 

fugit, et a thalami limine terga dedit, 
vixque manu pigra totiens infusa resurgunt 

lumina, vix moto corripit igne faces. 160 
saepe coronatis stillant imguenta capillis 

et traliitur multo splendida palla croco. 
cum tetigit limen, lacrimas mortisque timorem 

cernit et a eultu multa remota suo, 
proicit ipse sua deductas fronte coronas, 165 

spissaque de nitidis tergit amoma comis ; 
et pudet in tristi laetum consurgere turba, 

quique erat in palla, transit in ora rubor. 1 
At mihi, vae miserae ! torrentur febribus artus 

et gravius iusto pallia pondus habent, 170 
nostraque plorantes video super ora parentes, 

et face pro thalami fax mihi mortis adest. 
parce laboranti, picta dea laeta pharetra, 

daque salutiferam iam mihi fratris opem. 
turpe tibi est, ilium causas depellere leti, 1 75 

te contra titulum mortis habere meae. 
numquid, in umbroso cum velles fonte lavari, 

inprudens vultus ad tua labra tuli ? 
praeteriine tuas de tot caelestibus aras, 

aque tua est nostra spreta parente parens ? 180 
1 167, 16S before 165 Merle. 

a A reference to Oeneus, whose neglect of Diana caused the 
coming of the Calydonian boar. 



3°4 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



her comes my body's ill. For why is it that, as oft 
as the sacraments for marriage are made ready;, so 
oft the limbs of the bride-to-be sink down in 
languor ? Thrice now has Hymenaeus come to 
the altars reared for me and fled, turning his 
back upon the threshold of my wedding-chamber ; 
the lights so oft replenished by his lazy hand 
scarce rise again, scarce does he keep the torch 
alight by waving it. Oft does the perfume distil 
from his wreathed locks, and the mantle he 
sweeps along is splendid with much saffron. 
When he has touched the threshold, and sees 
tears aiid dread of death, and much that is far 
removed from the ways lie keeps, with his own 
hand lie tears the garlands from his brow and 
casts them forth, and dries the dense balsam from 
his glistening locks ; lie shames to stand forth 
glad in a gloomy throng, and the blush that was 
in his mantle passes to his cheeks. 

169 But for me — all, wretched ! — my limbs are 
parched with fever, and the stuffs that cover me are 
heavier than their wont ; I see my parents weeping 
over me, and instead of the wedding-torch the torch 
of death is at hand. Spare a maid in distress, O 
goddess whose joy is the painted quiver, and grant 
me the health-bringing aid of thy brother ! It is 
shame to thee that he drive away the causes of 
doom, and that thou, in contrast, have credit for my 
death. Can it be that, when thou didst wish to bathe 
in shady pool, I without witting cast eyes upon thee 
at thy batli ? Have I passed thy altars by, among 
those of so many deities of heaven ? rt Has thy mother 
been scorned by mine ? b I have sinned in naught 
6 Niobe's boast of her children to Leto. 



3°5 

x 



OVID 



nil ego peccavi, nisi quod peri una legi 

inque parum fausto carmine docta fui. 
Tu quoque pro nobis, si non mentiris amorem, 

tura feras ; prosint, quae nocuere, manus ! 
cur, quae succenset quod adhuc tibi pacta puella 185 

non tua sit, fieri ne tua possit, agit ? 
omnia de viva tibi sunt speranda ; quid aufert 

saeva mihi vitam, spem tibi diva mei ? 
Nec tu credideris illuin, cui destinor uxor, 

aegra superposita membra fovere manu. 190 
adsidet ille quidem, quantum pemiittitur, ipse 

sed meminit nostrum virginis esse torum. 
iam quoque nescio quid de me sensisse videtur ; 

nam lacrimae causa saepe latente cadunt, 
et minus audacter blauditur et oscula rara 195 

appetit 1 et timido me vocat ore suam. 
nec miror sensisse, notis cum prodar apertis ; 

in dextrum versor, cum venit ille, latus, 
nec loquor, et tecto simulatur lumine somnus, 

captantem tactus reicioque manum. 200 
ingemit et tacito suspirat pectore. me quod 

offensain, quainvis non mereatur, habet. 
ei mihi, quod gaudes, et te iuvat ista voluntas ! 2 

ei mihi, quod sensus sum tibi fassa meos ! 
si mihi lingua foret, 3 tu nostra iustius ira, 205 

qui mihi tendebas retia, dignus eras. 
Scribis. ut invalidum liceat tibi visere corpus. 

es procul a nobis, et tamen inde noces. 
mirabar quare tibi nomen Acontius esset ; 

quod faciat longe vulnus, acumen habes. 210 

1 appetit Pa.: accipit 2ISS.: admovet Dilthey Ehw.: 
applicat IIous. 

- voluntas J. F. Heusinger : ista voluntas P: ipsavoluptas 
Dilthey. 3 So Lv. ei mihi lingua labat Ehic: etc. 



306 



THE HERO IDES XXI 



except that I have read a false oath, and been clever 
with unpropitious verse. 

1S3 Do you, too, if your love is not a lie, offer up 
incense for me ; let the hands help which harmed 
me ! Why does the hand which is angered because 
the maiden pledged you is not yet yours so act that 
yours she cannot become ? While still I live you 
have everything to hope; why does the cruel goddess 
take from me my life, your hope of me from you ? 

1S9 Do not believe that he whose destined wife 
I am lavs his hand on me to fondle my sick limbs. 
He sits by me, indeed, as much as he may, but does 
not forget that mine is a virgin bed. He seems 
already, too, to feel in some way suspicion of me ; 
for his tears oft fall for some hidden cause, his 
flatteries are less bold, he asks for few kisses, and 
calls me his own in tones that are but timid. Nor 
do I wonder he suspects, for I betray myself by 
open signs ; I turn upon my right side when he 
comes, and do not speak, and close my eyes in 
simulated sleep, and when he tries to touch me I 
throw off his hand. He groans and sighs in his 
silent breast, for he suffers my displeasure without 
deserving it. Ah me, that you rejoice and are 
pleased by that state of my will ! Ah me, that I 
have confessed my feelings to you ! If my tongue 
should speak my mind, 'twere you more justly de- 
served my anger — you, for having spread the net 
for me. 

207 You write for leave to come and see me in 
my illness. You are far from me, and yet you wrong 
me even from there. I marvelled why your name 
was Acontius ; it is because you have the keen point 



3°7 

x 2 



OVID 



certe ego convalui nondum de vulnere tali, 

ut iaculo seriptis eminus icta tuis. 
quid tamen hue venias ? sane miserabile corpus, 

ingenii videas magna 1 tropaea tui ! 
concidimus macie ; color est sine sanguine, qua- 

lem 215 

in pomo refero mente fuisse tuo, 
Candida nec mixto sublucent ora rubore. 

forma novi talis marmoris esse solet ; 
argenti color est inter convivia talis, 

quod tactum gelidae frigore pallet aquae. 220 
si me nunc videas, visam prius esse negabis, 

"arte nee est," dices, "ista petita mea," 
promissique fidem, ne sim tibi iuncta, remittes, 

et cupies illud non meminisse deam. 
forsitan et facies iurem ut contraria rursus, 225 

quaeque legam mittes altera verba mihi. 
Sed tamen adspiceres vellem, quod et ipse l-oga- 
bas — 

adspiceres sj)onsae languida membra tuae ! 
durius et ferro cum sit tibi pectus, Aconti, 

tu veniam nostris vocibus ipse petas. 230 
ne tamen ignores ope qua revalescere possim, 

quaeritur a Delphis fata canente deo. 
is quoque nescio quam, nunc ut vaga fama susurrat, 

neclectam queritur testis habere fidem. 
hoc deus, hoc vates, hoc et mea carmina dicunt — 235 

at desunt voto carmina nulla tuo ! 
unde tibi favor hie ? nisi si 2 nova forte reperta est 

quae capiat magnos littera lecta deos. 

1 magna Dilthey : bina L : digna mn Loinep. 

2 si Pa.: quod L : forte nova iru. 



308 



a 'Akovtwv, a javelin, iacuhim. 

6 I.e. pray for the remission of my oath. 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



that deals a wound from afar." At any rate, I am 
not yet well of just such a wound, for I was pierced 
by your letter, a far-thrown dart. Yet why should 
you come to me ? Surely but a wretched body you 
would see — the mighty trophy of your skill. I have 
wasted and fallen away : my colour is bloodless, such 
as I recall to mind was the hue of that apple of 
yours, and my face is white, with no rising gleam 
of mingled red. Such is wont to be the fairness of 
fresh marble ; such is the colour of silver at the 
banquet table, pale with the chill touch of icy water. 
Should you see me now, you will declare you have 
never seen me before, and say : " No arts of mine 
e'er sought to win a maid like that." You will remit 
me the keeping of my promise, in fear lest I become 
yours, and will long for the goddess to forget it all. 
Perhaps you will even a second time make me 
swear, but in contrary wise, and will send me words 
a second time to read. 

227 But none the less I could wish you to look 
upon me, as you yourself entreated — to look upon 
the languid limbs of your promised bride ! Though 
your heart were harder than steel, Acontius, you 
yourself would ask pardon for my uttered words. 6 
Yet, that you be not unaware, the god who sings 
the fates at Delphi is being asked by what means 
I may grow strong again. He, too, as vague rumour 
whispers now, complains of the neglect of some 
pledge he was witness to. This is what the god 
says, this his prophet, and this the verses I read 
— surely, the wish of your heart lacks no support in 
prophetic verse ! Whence this favour to you ? — 
unless perhaps you have found some new writing 
the reading whereof ensnares even the mighty gods. 



3°9 



OVID 



teque tenentc deos nuraen sequor ipsa deovum, 

doque libens victas in tua vota manus ; 210 
fassaque sum matri deceptae foedera linguae 

lumina fixa tenens plena pudoris humo. 
cetera eura tua est ; plus hoc quoque virgine factum, 

non timuit tecum quod mea charta loqui. 
iam satis invalid os calamo lassavimus avtus, 245 

et manus officium longius aegra negat. 
quid, nisi quod cupio me iam coniungere tecum, 

restat ? ut adscribat littera nostra : Vale. 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



And since you hold bound the gods, I myself follow 
their will, and gladly yield my vanquished hands in 
fulfilment of your prayers ; with eyes full of shame 
held fast on the ground, I have confessed to my 
mother the pledge my tongue was trapped to 
give. The rest must be your care ; even this, that 
my letter has not feared to speak with you, is more 
than a maid should do. Already have I wearied 
enough with the pen my weakened members, and 
my sick hand refuses longer its office. What remains 
for my letter, if 1 say that 1 long to be united with 
you soon ? nothing but to add : Fare well ! 



II 

THE AMORES 



MANUSCRIPTS AND EDITIONS 
OF THE AM ORES. 



1. Codex Parisinus 8242, formerly called Puteanus, 

of the eleventh century, the best manuscript. 
It contains I. ii. 51 — III. xii. 26; xiv. 3 — xv. 8. 

2. Codex Parisinus 7311 Regius, of the tenth 

century. It contains I. i. 3 — ii. 49. 

3. Codex Sangallensis 864, of the eleventh 

century. It contains I. — III. ix. 10, with 
omission of I. vi. 46 — viii. 74. 

The Amorcs were printed first in the two editiones 
principes of Ovid in 1471 — one at Rome, and the 
other at Bologna, with independent texts. A 
Venetian edition appeared in 1491. They appeared 
in Heinsius in 1661. 

The principal modern editions of the Amoves are 
those of Heinsius-Burmann, Amsterdam, 1727 ; 
Lemaire, Paris, 1820 ; Merkel-Ehwald, Leipzig, 
1888; Riese, 1889; Postgate's Corpus Poetarum 
Latinomm, 1894 ; Nemethy, Budapest, 1907 ; Brandt, 
Leipzig, 1911. 



3M 



SIGNS AND ABBREVIATIONS 



P. — Parisinus. 

S. = Sangallensis. 
Hein. = Heinsius. 
Merk. = Merkel. 
Ehw. = Ehwald. 



Burm. = Burmann. 
Post. - Postdate. 
Nem. = Nemetliy. 

Pa. = Palmer. 

Br. = Brandt. 



3'5 



IN APPRECIATION OF THE 
AM ORES 



The reader •will not look to the Amores for pro- 
fundity of any sort, whether of thought or emotion. 
Except in a general way* they are not even the 
expression of personal experience, to say nothing of 
depth of passion. Corinna is only one of several loves 
to whom the poet pays literary court, and it is more 
than doubtful whether even she is real. 

It is exactly this absence of the serious that gives 
the Amores their peculiar charm — a charm different 
from that of either Catullus, whose passion is real, or 
Tibullus and Propertius, who also sing in somewhat 
serious strain. For all of his much loving, the poet 
of the Amores is philosophic in love, and his light- 
hearted freedom from its pains finds light and airy ex- 
pression. No small number of them, indeed, are but 
slightly connected with love, and only a very few, as 
I. vii. and III. xi., seem prompted by anything that 
approaches genuine feeling. The Amores are above 
all the product of poetic fancy ; the poet's experi- 
ence with love of course contributes, and contributes 
abundantly — but it only contributes ; it is the 
element that serves for the fusing of his artist's 
instinct with the literature of love with which his 
mind is saturated — the poetry of his Greek and 
Roman predecessors. 

The heart that indites the matter of the Amores is 
no less free from suspicion of heaviness than the hand 
that obeys the heart ; their language is limpid, 
smooth, and flowing, fit medium of their fluent and 

316 



THE AMORES I. vii 



my right o'er my lady-love be greater ? The son of 
Tydeus left most vile example of offence. He was 
the first to smite a goddess" — I am the second ! And 
he was less guilty than I. I injured her I professed 
to love ; Tydeus' son was cruel with a foe. 

35 Go now. victor, make ready mighty triumphs, 
circle your hair with laurel and pay your vows to 
Jove, and let the thronging retinue that follow 
your car cry out : " Ho ! our valiant hero has been 
victorious over a girl!" Let her walk before, a 
downcast captive with hair let loose — from head to 
foot pure white, did her wounded cheeks allow ! 
More fit had it been for her to be marked with the 
pressure of my lips, and to bear on her neck the 
print of caressing tooth. Finally, if I must needs 
be swept along like a swollen torrent, and blind 
anger must needs make me its prey, were it not 
enough to have cried out at the frightened girl, 
without the too hard threats I thundered ? or to 
have shamed her by tearing apart her gown from 
top to middle? — her girdle would have come to the 
rescue there. 

40 But, as it was, I could endure to rend cruelly 
the hair from her brow and mark with my nail 
her free-born cheeks. She stood there bereft of 
sense, with face bloodless and white as blocks of 
marble hewn from Parian cliffs. I saw her limbs all 
nerveless and her frame a-tremb!e — like the leaves 
of the poplar shaken by the breeze, like the slender 
reed set quivering by gentle Zephyr, or the surface 
of the wave when ruffled by the warm South-wind ; 
and the tears, long hanging in her eyes, came 
flowing o'er her cheeks even as water distils from 
snow that is cast aside. 'Twas then that first I 



345 



OVID 



tunc ego me primum coepi sentire nocentem — 

sanguis erant lacrimae, quas dabat ilia, meus. 60 
ter tamen ante pedes volui procumbere supplex ; 

ter fonnidatas reppulit 1 ilia manus. 
At tu ne dubita — minuet vindicta dolorem — 

protinus in vultus unguibus ire meos. 
nec nostris oculis nec nostris parce capillis : G5 

quamlibet infirmas adiuvat ira manus ; 
neve mei sceleris tarn tristia signa supersint, 

pone recompositas in statione comas ! 

VIII 

Est quaedam — quicumque volet cognoscere lenam, 

audiat ! — est quaedam nomine Dipsas anus, 
ex re nomen habet — nigri non ilia parentem 

Memnonis in roseis sobria vidit equis. 
ilia magas artes Aeaeaque carmina novit 5 

inque caput liquidas arte recurvat aquas ; 
scit bene, quid gramen, quid torto concita rhombo 

licia, quid valeat virus amantis equae. 
cum voluit, toto glomerantur nubila caelo ; 

cum voluit, puro fulget in orbe dies. 10 
sanguine, siqua fides, stillantia 2 sidera vidi ; 

purpureus Lunae sanguine vultus erat. 
banc ego nocturnas versam volitare per umbras 

suspicor et pluma corpus anile tegi. 

3 retulit P ■. reppulit usual reading : rettudit Ehw. Br. 
2 stillantia usual reading : stellantia P Nem. 

" Meaning " thirsty." 6 Aurora, the dawn. 

346 



THE AM ORES I. viii 



began to feel my guilt — my blood it was that flowed 
when she shed those tears. Thrice, none the less, I 
would have cast myself before her feet a suppliant ; 
though thrice thrust she back my dreadful hands. 

63 But you, stay not — for your vengeance will 
lessen my grief — from straight assailing my features 
with your nails. Spare neither my eyes nor yet 
my hair : however weak the hand, ire gives it 
strength ; or at least, that the sad signs of my 
misdeed may not survive, once more range in due 
rank your ordered locks. 



VIII 

Thehe is a certain — whoso wishes to know of a 
bawd, let him hear ! — a certain old dame there is by 
the name of Dipsas. Her name a accords with fact — 
she has never looked with sober eye upon black 
Memnon's mother, her of the rosy steeds. 6 She 
knows the ways of magic, and Aeaean incantations, 
and by her art turns back the liquid waters upon 
their source ; she knows well what the herb can 
do, what the thread set in motion by the whirl- 
ing magic wheel, what the poison of the mare in 
heat. Whenever she has willed, the clouds are 
rolled together overall the sky; whenever she has 
willed, the day shines forth in a clear heaven. I 
have seen, if you can believe me, the stars letting 
drop down blood ; crimson with blood was the face 
of Luna. I suspect she changes form and flits about 
in the shadows of night, her aged body covered 
with plumage. I suspect, and rumour bears me out. 



347 



OVID 



suspieor, et fama est. oeulis quoque pupula duplex 1 

fulminat, et gemino lumen ab orbe venit. 1 
evocat antiquis proavos atavosque sepuleris 

et solidam longo carmine findit humum. 
Haec sibi proposuit thalamos temerare pudicos ; 

nee tamen eloquio lingua nocente caret. 2 
fors me sermoni testem dedit ; ilia monebat 

talia — me duplices occuluere fores : 
" scis here te, raea lux, iuveni placuisse beato ? 

haesit et in vultu constitit usque tuo. 
et cur non placeas ? nulli tua forma secunda est ; 2 

me miseram, dignus corpore cultus abest ! 
tarn felix esses quam formosissima, vellem — 

non ego, te facta divite, pauper ero. 
Stella tibi oppositi nocuit contraria Martis. 

Mars abiit ; signo nunc Venus apta suo. 3 
prosit ut adveniens, en adspice ! dives amator 

te cupiit ; curae, quid tibi desit, habet. 
est etiam faeies, quae se tibi conparet, illi ; 

si te non emptam vellet, emendus erat." 
Erubuit. " decet alba quidem pudor ora, sed iste, 3 

si simules, prodest ; verus obesse solet. 
cum bene deiectis gremium spectabis ocellis, 

quantum quisque ferat, respiciendus erit. 
forsitan inmnndae Tatio regnante Sabinae 

noluerint habiles pluribns esse viris ; 4 
nunc Mars externis animos exercet in arm is, 

at Venus Aeneae regnat in urbe sui. 

1 venit P: micat P 5 Xem. Br. 

a Pliny, X.II. vii. 16, 17, IS, speaks of women with doubl 
pupils. 

343 



THE AMORES I. viii 



From her eyes, too, double pupils dart their light- 
nings, with rays that issue from twin orbs. rt She 
summons forth from ancient sepulehres the dead of 
generations far remote, and with long incantations 
lays open the solid earth. 

19 This old dame has set herself to profane a 
modest union ; her tongue is none the less with- 
out a baneful eloquence. Chance made me witness 
to what she said ; she was giving these words of 
counsel — the double doors concealed me : " Know 
you, my light, that yesterday you won the favour of 
a wealthy youth ? Caught fast, he could not keep 
his eyes from your faee. And why should you not 
win favour ? Second to none is your beauty. Ah 
me, apparel worthy of your person is your lack ! I 
could wish you as fortunate as you are most fair — 
for with you become rich, I shall not be poor. Mars 
with contrary star is what has hindered you. Mars 
is gone ; now favouring Venus' star is here. How her 
rising brings yon fortune, lo, behold! A rich lover 
has desired yon ; he has interest in your needs. 
He has a faee, too, that may match itself with 
yours ; were he unwilling to buy, he were worthy 
to be bought. 

35 My lady blushed. 

"Blushes, to be sure, become a pale face, but 
the blush one feigns is the one that profits ; real 
blushing is wont to be loss. With eyes becomingly 
cast down you will look into your lap, and regard 
each lover according to what he brings. It may be 
that in Tatins' reign the unadorned Sabine fair 
would not be had to wife by more than one ; but 
now in wars far off Mars tries the souls of men, and 
'tis Venus reigns in the city of her Aeneas. The 



349 



OVID 



ludunt formosae ; casta est, quam nemo rogavit — 

aut, si rustieitas non vetat, ipsa rogat. 
has quoque, quas frontis rugas in vertice poi'tas, 1 45 

excute ; de rugis crimina multa cadent. 
Penelope iuvenum vires temptabat in arcu ; 

qui latus ai-gueret, corneus arcus erat. 
labitur oeculte fallitque volubilis aetas, 

et celer admissis labituv annus equis. 2 50 
aera nitent usu, vestis bona quaerit haberi, 

canescunt turpi tecta relicta situ — 
forma, nisi admittas, nullo exercente senescit. 

nec satis efFectus unus et alter habent ; 
certior e multis nec iani invidiosa rapina est. 55 

plena venit eanis dc grege praeda lupis. 
Ecce, quid istc tuus praeter nova carmina vates 

donat ? amatoris milia multa leges. 3 
ipse deus vatum palla spectabilis aurea 

tractat inauratae consona fila lyrae. GO 
qui dabit, ille tibi magno sit maior Homero ; 

crede mihi, res est ingeniosa dare, 
nec tu, siquis erit capitis mercede redemptus, 

despiee ; gypsati crimen inane pedis, 
nec te decipiant veteres circum atria cerae. 65 

tolle tuos tecum, pauper amator, avos ! 
quin, quia pulcher erit, poseet sine munere noctem ! 

quod det, amatorem flagitet ante suum ! 
Parcius exigito pretium, dum retia tendis, 

ne fugiant; captos legibus ure tuis ! 70 

1 So theMSS.: quae . . . portant Burm. Ehw, Nem. Br. 

2 ut . . . amnis aquis N. Hem. Nem. 3 feres Nem. 



a The wrinkles are those of feigned austerity, the mask of 
a wanton life. 

6 Apollo. c Slaves offered for sale were thus marked. 
35° 



THE AMORES I. viii 



beautiful keep holiday ; chaste is she whom no one 
has asked — or, be she not too countrified, she 
herself asks first. Those wrinkles, too, which you 
carry high on your brow, shake off ; from the 
wrinkles many a naughtiness will fall." Penelope, 
when she used the bow, was making trial of 
the young men's powers ; of horn was the bow 
that proved their strength. The stream of a lifetime 
glides smoothly on and is past before we know, and 
swift the year glides by with horses at full speed. 
Bronze grows bright with use ; a fair garment asks 
for the wearing ; the abandoned dwelling moulders 
with age and corrupting neglect — and beauty, so 
you open not your doors, takes age from lack of use. 
Nor, do one or two lovers avail enough ; more sure 
your spoil, and less invidious, if from many. 'Tis 
from the flock a full prey comes to hoary wolves. 

57 cc Think, what does your fine poet give you 
besides fresh verses ? You will get many thousands 
of lover's lines to read. The god of poets himself 6 
attracts the gaze by his golden robe, and sweeps 
the hjirmonious chords of a lyre dressed in gold. 
Let him who will give be greater for you than great 
Homer ; believe me, giving calls for genius. And 
do not look down on him if he be one redeemed 
with the price of freedom ; the chalk-marked 
foot c is an empty reproach. Nor let yourself be 
deluded by ancient masks about the hall. Take thy 
grandfathers and go, thou lover who art poor ! Nay, 
should he ask your favours without paying because 
he is fair, let him first demand what he may give 
from a lover of his own. 

69 " Exact more cautiously the price while you 
spread the net, lest they take flight ; once taken, 



35 1 



OVID 



nec nocuit simulatus amor ; sine, credat arnari, 

et 1 cave ne gratis hie tibi constet amor ! 
saepe nega noctes. capitis modo finge dolorem, 

et modo, quae causas praebeat, I sis erit. 
mox recipe, ut nullum patiendi colligat usum, 75 

neve relentescat saepe rejmlsus amor, 
surda sit oranti tua ianua, laxa ferenti ; 

audiat exclusi verba receptus amans ; 
et, quasi laesa prior, nonnumquam irascere laeso — 

vanescit cidpa culpa repensa tua. 80 
sed numquam dederis spatiosum tempus in iram ; 

saepe simultates ira morata tacit, 
quin etiam discant oculi lacrimare coacti, 

et faciant udas ille vel ille genas ; 
nec, siquem falles, tu periurare timeto — 85 

commodat in lusus numina surda Venus, 
servus et ad partes sollers ancilla parentur, 

qui doceant, apte quid tibi possit emi ; 
et sibi pauca rogeut — multos si pauca rogabunt, 

postmodo de stipula grandis acervus erit. 90 
et soror et mater, nutrix quoque carpat amantem ; 

fit cito per multas praeda petita manus. 
cum te deficient poscendi munera causae, 

natalem libo testificare tuum ! 
Ne securus amet nullo rivale, caveto ; 95 

non bene, si tollas proelia, durat amor, 
ille viri videat toto vestigia lecto 

factaque lascivis livida colla notis. 
munera praecipue videat, quae miserit alter. 

si dederit nemo, Sacra roganda Via est. 100 

1 et P : at vidg. : sed ed. prin. 
a Where there were man)' shops. 

35 2 



THE AMORES 1. viii 



prey upon them on terms of your own. Nor is there 
harm in pretended love ; allow him to think he is 
loved, and take care lest this love bring you nothing 
in ! Often deny your favours. Feign headache now, 
and now let Isis be what affords you pretext. After 
a time, receive him, lest he grow used to suffering, 
and his love grow slack through being oft repulsed. 
Let your portal be deaf to prayers, but wide to the 
giver ; let the lover you welcome overhear the words 
of the one you have sped ; sometimes, too, when 
you have injured him, be angry, as if injured first — 
charge met by counter-charge will vanish. But 
never give to anger long range of time ; anger 
that lingers long oft causes breach. Nay, even let 
your eyes learn to drop tears at command, and the 
one or the other bedew at will your cheeks ; nor 
fear to swear falsely if deceiving anyone — Venus 
lends deaf ears to love's deceits. Have slave and 
handmaid skilled to act their parts, to point out 
the apt gift to buy for you ; and have them ask 
little gifts for themselves — if they ask little gifts 
from many persons, there will by-and-bye grow from 
straws a mighty heap. And have your sister and 
your mother, and your nurse, too, keep plucking at 
your lover ; quickly comes the spoil that is sought 
by many hands. When pretext fails for asking gifts, 
have a eake to be sign to him your birthday is come. 

■ 95 "Take care lest he love without a rival, and 
feel secure ; love lasts not well if you give it naught 
to fight. Let him see the traces of a lover o'er all 
your couch, and note about your neck the livid marks 
of passion. Above all else, have him see the presents 
another has sent. If no one has sent, you must ask 
of the Sacred Way." When you have taken from 

353 

\ A 



OVID 



cum multa abstuleris, ut non tamen omnia donet, 

quod numquam reddas, commodet, ipsa roga ! 
lingua iuvet mentemque tegat — blandire noceque ; 

inpia sub dulci melle venena latent. 
Haec si praestiteris usu mihi cognita longo, 105 

nec tulerint voces ventus et aura meas, 
saepe mihi dices vivae bene, saepe rogabis, 

ut mea defunctae molliter ossa cubent." 
Vox erat in cursu, cum me mea prodidit umbra, 

at nostrae vix se continuere manus, 110 
quin albam raramque comam lacrimosaque vino 

lumina rugosas distraherentque genas. 
di tibi dent nullosque Lares inopemque senectam, 

et longas hiemes perpetuamque sitim ! 

IX 

Militat omnis amans, et habet sua castra Cupido ; 

Attice, crede mihi, militat omnis amans. 
quae bello est habilis, Veneri quoque convenit aetas. 

turpe senex miles, turpe senilis amor, 
quos petiere duces animos 1 in milite forti, 5 

hos petit in socio bella puella viro. 2 
pervigilant ambo ; terra requiescit uterque — 

ille fores dominae servat, at ille ducis. 
militis officium longa est via ; mitte puellam, 

strenuus exempto fine sequetur amans. 10 

1 Rautenherg 2 toro Hein. Mtrk. 

354 



THE AiMORES I. is 



him many gifts, in ease he still give up not all 
he has, yourself ask him to lend — what you never 
will restore ! Let your tongue aid you, and 
cover up your thoughts — wheedle while you despoil ; 
wicked poisons have for hiding-place sweet honey. 

105 ci jf y OU f u ]fj] these precepts, learned by me 
from long experience, and wind and breeze carry 
not my words away, you will often speak me well as 
long as I live, and often pray my bones lie softly 
when I am dead." 

109 Her words were still running, when my 
shadow betrayed me. But my hands could scarce 
restrain themselves from tearing her sparse white 
hair, and her eyes, all lachrymose from wine, and her 
wrinkled cheeks. May the gods give you no abode 
and helpless age, and long winters and everlasting" 
thirst ! 



IX 

Every lover is a soldier, and Cupid has a camp of 
his own ; Atticus, believe me, every lover is a soldier. 
The age that is meet for the wars is also suited to 
Venus. 'Tis unseemly for the old man to soldier, 
unseemly for the old man to love. The spirit that 
captains seek in the valiant soldier is the same the 
fair maid seeks in the man who mates with her. 
Both wake through the night ; on the ground each 
takes his rest — the one guards his mistress's door, 
the other his captain's. The soldier's duty takes 
him a long road ; send but his love before, and the 
strenuous lover, too, will follow without end. He 



355 

A A 2 



OVID 



ibit in advevsos montes duplieataque nimbo 

flumina, congestas exteret ille nives, 
net 1 f'reta pressurus tumidos cansabitur Euros 

aptaque verrendis sideva quaeret aquis. 
quis nisi vel miles vel amans et frigora noctis 15 

et denso mixtas perferet imbre nives ? 
mittitur infestos alter speculator in hostes ; 

in rivale oculos alter, ut hoste, tenet, 
ille graves urbes, hie durae limen amicae 

obsidet ; hie portas frangit, at ille fores. 20 
Saepe soporatos invadere profuit hostes 

caedere et armata vulgus inerme maim, 
sic fera Threicii ceciderunt agmina Rhesi, 
^et dominum capti deseruistis equi. 
saepe maritorum somnis utuntur amantes, 25 

et sua sopitis hostibus anna movent, 
custodum transire manus vigilumque catervas 

militis et miseri semper amantis opus. 
Mars dubius nec certa Venus ; victique resurgunt, 

quosque neges umquam posse iacere, cadunt. 30 
Ergo desidiam quicumque vocabat amorera, 

desinat. ingenii est experientis amor, 
ardet in abdueta Briseide magnus Achilles — 

dum licet, Argivas frangite, Troes, opes ! 
Hector ab Andromaches conplexibus ibat ad arma, 35 

et, galeam caj)iti quae daret, uxor erat. 
summa ducunv, Atrides, visa Priameide fertur 

Maenadis effusis obstipuisse comis. 



a Under the arms of Ulysses and Diomedes. 

356 



THE AMORES I. ix 



will climb opposing mountains and cross rivers 
doubled by pouring rain, he will tread the high- 
piled snows, and when about to ride the seas he 
will not prate of swollen East-winds and look for 
fit stars ere sweeping the waters with his oar. Who 
but either soldier or lover will bear alike the cold 
of night and the snows mingled with dense rain ? 
The one is sent to scout the dangerous foe ; the 
other keeps eyes upon his rival as on a foeman. 
The one besieges mighty towns, the other the 
threshold of an unyielding mistress ; the other 
breaks in doors, the one, gates. 

21 Oft hath it proven well to rush on the enemy 
sunk in sleep, and to slay with armed hand the 
unarmed rout. Thus fell the lines of Thracian 
Rhesus," and you, O captured steeds, left your lord 
behind. Oft lovers, too, take vantage of the hus- 
band's slumber, and bestir their own weapons while 
the enenrylies asleep. To pass through companies of 
guards and bands of sentinels is ever the task both 
of soldier and wretched lover. Mars is doubtful, 
and Venus, too, not sure ; the vanquished rise 
again, and they fall you would say could never be 
brought low. 

31 Then whoso hath called love spiritless, let him 
cease. Love is for the soul ready for any proof. 
Aflame is great Achilles for Briseis taken away — 
men of Troy, erush while ye may, the Argive 
strength ! Hector from Andromache's embrace 
went forth to arms, and 'twas his wife that set the 
helmet on his head. The greatest of captains, 
Atreus' son, they say, stood rapt at sight of Priam's 
daughter, 6 Maenad-like with her streaming hair. 
* Cassandra and Agamemnon. 

357 



OVID 



Mars quoque deprensus fabrilia vincula sensit ; 

notior in caelo fabula nulla fuit. 40 
ipse ego segnis eram diseinctaque in otia natus ; 

mollierant animos lectus et umbra meos. 
inpulit ignavum formosae cura puellae 

iussit et in eastris aera merere suis. 
inde vides agilem nocturnaque bella gerentem. 45 

qui nolet fieri desidiosus, araet ! 



X 

Qualis ab Eurota Phrygiis avecta carinis 

coniugibus belli causa duobus erat, 
qualis erat Lede, quam plumis abditus albis 

callidus in falsa lusit adulter ave, 
qualis Amymone siccis erravit in agris, 1 5 

cum premeret summi verticis urna comas — 
talis eras ; aquilamque in te taurumque timebam, 

et quidquid magno de love fecit amor. 
Nunc timor omnis abest, animique resanuit error, 

nec facies oculos iam capit ista meos. 10 
cur sim rautatus, quaeris ? quia munera poscis. 

haec te non patitur causa placere mihi. 
donee eras simplex, animum cum corpore amavi ; 

nunc mentis vitio laesa figura tua est. 
et puer est et nudus Amor; sine sordibus annos 15 

et nullas vestes,, ut sit apertus, habet. 

1 Argis Burm. 

° The tale of Mars and Venus and Vulcan, told in Odyssey 
viii. 266-369. 

6 I.e. The couch on which he wrote his verses lying in the 
shade. 

353 



THE AMORES I. x 



Mars, too, was caught, and felt the bonds of the 
smith ; no tale was better known in heaven.' 7 For 
myself, my bent was all to dally in ungirt idleness ; 
my couch and the shade 6 had made my temper 
mild. Love for a beautiful girl has started me from 
craven ways and bidden me take service in her camp. 
For this you see me full of action, and waging the 
wars of night. Whoso would not lose all his spirit, 
let him love ! 



X 

Such as was she who was carried from the 
Eu rotas in Phrygian keel to be cause of war to 
her two lords ; such as was Leda, whom the cunning 
lover deceived in guise of the bird with gleaming 
plumage ; such as was Amymone, going through 
thirsty fields with full urn pressing the loeks on her 
head — such were you ; and in my love for you I 
feared the eagle and the bull, and what other form 
soever love has caused great Jove to take. 

9 Now my fear is all away, and my heart is healed 
of straying ; those charms of yours no longer take 
my eyes. Why am I changed, you ask ? Because 
you demand a price. This is the cause that will 
not let you please me. As long as you were simple, 
I loved you soul and body ; now your beauty is 
marred by the fault of your heart. Love is both a 
child and naked : his guileless years and lack of 
raiment are sign that lie is free. Why bid the child 

c Sent by her father Danaus for water, she attracted 
Neptune. 

359 



OVID 



quid puerum Veneris pretio prostare iubetis? 

quo pretium condat, 1 non habet ille sinum ! 
nec Venus apta feris Veneris nee filius arrais — 

non decet inbelles aera merere deos. 20 
Stat meretrix certo cuivis niercabilis aere, 

et miseras iusso corpore quaerit opes ; 
devovet imperium tamen haec lenonis avari 

et, quod vos facitis sponte, coacta facit. 
Sumite in exemplum pecudes ratione carentes ; 25 

turpe eritj ingenium mitius esse feris. 
non equa munus equum, non taurum vacca poposcit ; 

non aries placitam munere captat ovem. 
sola viro mulier spoliis exultat ademptis, 

sola locat noctes, sola locanda venit, 30 
et vendit quod utrumque iuvat quod uterque petebat, 

et pretium, quanti gaudeat ipsa, facit. 
quae Venus ex aequo ventura est grata duobus, 

altera cur illam vendit et alter emit ? 
cur mihi sit damno, til)i sit lucrosa voluptas, 35 

quam socio motu femina virque ferunt ? 
Non bene conducti vendunt periuria testes, 

non bene selecti iudicis area patet. 
turpe reos empta miseros defendere lingua ; 

quod faciat magnas, turpe tribunal, opes ; 40 
turpe tori reditu census augere paternos, 

et faciem lucro prostituisse suam. 
gratia pro rebus merito debetur inemptis ; 

pro male conducto gratia nulla toro. 

1 condas P. 



a Sinus, a pocket-like fold in the ancient garment. 
6 One of the praetor's panel. 

360 



THE AM ORES I. x 



of Venus offer himself fov gain? He lias no poeket 
where to put away his gain ! a Neither Venus nor 
her son is apt at service of cruel arms — it is not 
meet that unwarlike gods should draw the soldier's 
pay. 

21 'Tis the harlot stands for sale at the fixed price 
to anyone soe'er, and wins her wretched gains with 
body at the call ; yet even she calls curses on the 
power of the greedy pander, and does beeause 
compelled what you perform of your own will. 

25 Look for pattern to the beasts of the field, un- 
reasoning though they are ; 'twill shame you to find 
the wild things gentler than yourself. Mare never 
claimed gift from stallion, nor cow from bull ; the 
ram courts not the favoured ewe with gift. 'Tis only 
woman glories in the spoil she takes from man, she 
only hires out her favours, she only eomes to be 
hired, and makes a sale of what is delight to both 
and what both wished, and sets the priee by the 
measure of her own delight. The love that is to 
be of equal joy to both — why should the one make 
sale of it, and the other purchase ? Why should 
my pleasure cause me loss, and yours to you bring 
gain — the pleasure that man and woman both 
contribute to ? 

37 It is not honour for witnesses to make false 
oaths for gain, nor for the chosen juror's b purse to lie 
open for the bribe. 'Tis base to defend the wretched 
culprit with purchased eloquence ; the court that 
makes great gains is base ; 'tis base to swell a 
patrimony with a revenue from love, and to offer 
one's own beauty for a price. Thanks are due and 
deserved for boons unbought ; no thanks are felt 
for love that is meanly hired. He who has made 

361 



OVID 



omnia conductor solvit ; mercede soluta 45 

non manet officio debitor ille tuo. 
parcite, formosae, pretium pro nocte pacisci ; 

non habet eventus sordida praeda bonos. 
non fuit armillas tanti pepigisse 1 Sabinas, 

ut premerent sacrae virginis anna caput ; 50 
e quibus exierat, traiecit viscera ferro 

Alius, et poenae causa monile fuit. 
Nec tamen indignum est a divite praemia posci ; 

munera poscenti quod dare possit, habet. 
carpite de plenis pendentes vitibus uvas ; 55 

praebeat Alcinoi poma benignus ager ! 
officium pauper numerat studiumque fidemque; 

quod quis habet., dominae conferat omne suae, 
est quoque carminibus meritas celebrare puellas 

dos mea ; quam volui, nota fit arte mea. 60 
scindentur vestes, gemmae frangentur et aurum ; 

carmina quam tribuent, fama perennis erit. 
nec dare, sed pretium posci dedignor et odi ; 

quod nego poscenti, desine velle, dabo ! 

XI 

Colligere incertos et in ordine ponere crines 
docta neque ancillas inter habenda Nape, 
1 eligisse P : tetigisse s : pepigisse sinistras ed. prin. 

a The Vestal Tarpeia asked as the price of her treason 
what the Sabines had on their left arms, meaning their 
armlets of gold, but was crushed beneath the shields they 
carried there. 



362 



THE AMORES I. xi 



the hire pays all ; when the price is paid he remains 
no more a debtor for your favour. Spare, fair ones, 
to ask a price for your love ; a sordid gain can bring 
no good in the end. 'Twas not worth while for the 
holy maid to bargain for the Sabine armlets, only 
that arms should crush her down ; a a son once 
pierced with the sword the bosom whence he came, 
and a necklace was the cause of the mother's pain. 6 

53 And yet it is no shame to ask for presents from 
the rich ; they have wherefrom to give you when 
you ask. Pluck from full vines the hanging clusters ; 
let the genial field of Aleinous yield its fruits ! He 
who is poor counts out to you as pay his service, 
zeal, and faithfulness ; the kind of wealth each has, 
let him bring it all to the mistress of his heart. 
My dower, too, it is to glorify the deserving fair in 
song ; whoever I have willed is made famous by my 
art. Gowns will be rent to rags, and gems and gold 
be broke to fragments ; the glory my songs shall 
give will last for ever. 'Tis not the giving but the 
asking of a price, that 1 despise and hate. What I 
refuse at your demand, cease only to wish, and I 
will give ! 



XI 

Nape, O adept in gathering and setting in order 
scattered locks, and not to be numbered among 
handmaids, O Nape known for useful ministry in 

6 Knowing that the Fates had decreed his death in case 
lie went, Eriphyle, for a necklace, caused her husband 
Amphiaraus to be one of the seven against Thebes, and was 
slain by Alcmaeon, her son. 

3»3 



OVID 



inque ministeriis furtivae cognita noctis 

utilis et dandis ingeniosa notis 
saepe venire ad me dubitantem hortata Corinnam, 5 

saepe laboranti fida reperta mihi — 
accipe et ad dominam peraratas mane tabellas 

perfer et obstantes sedula pelle moras ! 
nee silicum venae nec durum in pectore ferrum, 

nec tibi simplicitas ordine maior adest. 10 .. 

credibile est et te sensisse Cupidinis arcus — 

in me militiae signa tuere tuae ! 
si quaeret quid agam, spe noctis vivere dices ; 

cetera fert blanda cera notata manu. 
Dum loquor, hora fugit. vacuae bene redde 

tabellas, 15 

verum continuo fac tamen ilia legat. 
adspicias oculos mando frontemque legentis ; 

e tacito vultu scire futura licet, 
nec mora, perlectis rescribat multa, iubeto ; 

odi, cum late splendida cera vacat. 20 
conprimat ordinibus versus, oculosque moretur 

margine in extremo littera rasa meos. 
Quid digitos opus est graphio lassare tenendo ? 

hoc habeat scriptum tota tabella " veni ! " 
non ego victrices lauro redimire tabellas 25 

nec Veneris media ponere in aede morer. 
subscribam : " veneri fidas sibi naso ministras 

DEDICAT, AT NUPER VILE FUISTIS ACER." 



3 6 4 



THE AMOHES I. xi 



the stealthy night and skilled in the giving- of the 
signal, oft urging Corinna when in doubt to conic 
to me, often found tried and true to me in times 
of trouble — receive and take early to your mistress 
these tablets I have inscribed, and care that 
nothing hinder or delay ! Your breast has in it 
no vein of flint or unyielding iron, nor are you 
simpler than befits your station. One could believe 
you, too, had felt the darts of Cupid — in aiding 
rne defend the standards of your own campaigns ! 
Should she ask how I fare, you will say 'tis my 
hope of her favour that lets me live ; as for the rest, 
'tis charactered in the wax by my fond hand. 

15 While I speak, the hour is flying. Give her the 
tablets while she is happily free, but none the less 
see that she reads them straight. Regard her eves 
and brow, I enjoin you, as she reads ; though 
she speak not, you may know from her face 
what is to come. And do not wait, but bid her 
write much in answer when she has read ; I hate 
when a fine, fair page is widely blank. See she 
pack the lines together, and long detain mv eyes 
with letters traced on the outermost marge. 

23 What need to tire her fingers by holding of the 
pen ? Let the whole tablet have writ on it only 
this : ' f Come ! " Then straight would I t;ike the 
conquering tablets, and bind them round with laurel, 
and hang them in the mid of Venus' shrine. I 
would write beneath: "to venus naso dedicates his 

FAITHFUL AIDS; YET HUT NOW YOU WERE ONLY MEAN 
MAPLE." 



36S 



OVID 



XII 

Flete meos casus — tristes rediere tabellae 

infelix hodie littera posse negat. 
omina sunt aliquid ; modo cum discedere vellet, 

ad limen digitos restitit icta Nape, 
raissa foras iterum limen transire memento 5 

cautius atque alte sobria ferre pedem ! 
Ite hinc, difficiles, funebria ligna, tabellae, 

tuque, negaturis cera referta notis ! — 
quam, puto, de longae collectam flore cicutae 

melle sub infami Corsica misit apis. 10 
at tamquam minio penitus medicata rubebas — 

ille color vere sanguinolentus erat. 
proiectae triviis iaceatis, inutile lignum, 

vosque rotae frangat praetereuntis onus ! 
ilium etiam, qui vos ex arbore vertit in usum, 15 

convincam puras non habuisse manus. 
praebuit ilia arbor niisero suspendia collo, 

carnifici dii'as praebuit ilia cruces ; 
ilia dedit turpes ravis 1 bubonibus umbras, 

vulturis in ramis et strigis ova tulit. 20 
his ego commisi nostros insanus amores 

molliaque ad dominam verba ferenda dedi ? 
aptius hae capiant vadimonia garrula cerae, 

quas aliquis duro cognitor ore legat ; 
inter ephemeridas melius tabulasque iacerent, 25 

in quibus absumptas fleret avarus opes. 

1 ravis X. Hein.: rasis P: raris Arund.: raucis many. 
3 66 



THE AM ORES I. xii 



XII 

Weep for my misfortune — my tablets have returned 
with gloomy news ! The unhappy missive says : 
" Not possible to-day." There is something in omens ; 
just now as Nape would leave, she tripped her toe 
upon the threshold and stopped. When next you 
are sent abroad, remember to take more care as you 
cross, and soberly to lift your foot full clear ! 

7 Away from me, ill-natured tablets, funereal 
pieces of wood, and you, wax close writ with charac- 
ters that will say me nay ! — wax which I think was 
gathered from the flower of the long hemlock by 
the bee of Corsica and sent us under its ill-famed 
honey. Yet you had a blushing hue, as if tinctured 
deep with minium — but that colour was really a colour 
from blood. Lie there at the crossing of the ways, 
where I throw yon, useless sticks, and may the 
passing wheel with its heavy load crush you ! Yea, 
and the man who converted you from a tree to an' 
object for use, 1 will assure you, did not have pure 
hands. That tree, too, lent itself to the hanging of 
some wretched neck, and furnished the cruel cross to 
the executioner; it gave its foul shade to hoarse 
horned owls, and its branches bore up the eggs of 
the screech-owl and the vulture. To tablets like 
these did I insanely commit my loves and give my 
tender words to be carried to my lady ? More fitly 
would such tablets receive the wordy bond, for some 
judge to read in dour tones ; 'twere better they 
should lie among day-ledgers, and accounts in which 
some miser weeps o'er money spent. 

367 



OVID 



Ergo ego vos rebus duplices pro nomine sensi. 

auspicii numerus lion er;it ipse boni. 
quid precer iratus, nisi vos cariosa senectus 

rodat, et inmundo cera sit alba situ ? 30 

XIII 

I am super oeeanum venit a seniore marito 

flava pruinoso quae vehit axe diem. 
"Quo properas, Aurora? mane! — sic Memnonis 
umbris 

annua sollemni caede parentet avis ! 
nunc iuvat in teneris dominae iacuisse lacertis ; 5 

si quando, lateri nunc bene iuncta meo est. 
nunc etiam somni pingues et frigidus aer, 

et liquidum tenui gutture cantat avis, 
quo properas, ingrata viris, ingrata puellis ? 

roscida purpurea supprime lora manu ! 10 
Ante tuos ortus melius sua sidera servat 

navita nec media nescius errat aqua ; 
te surgit quamvis lassus veniente viator, 

et miles saevas aptat ad arma manus. 
prima bidente vides oneratos arva colentes ; 15 

prima vocas tardos sub iuga panda boves. 
tu pueros somno fraudas tradisque magistris, 

ut subeant tenerae verbera saeva manus ; 1 
1 15-18 omitted by P s : elsewhere after 10. 

a They were tabellae duplices, double tablets. 

6 Tithonus was immortal, but not immortally young. 

From the ashes of Memnon, Aurora's son, king of 

368 



THE AMORES 1. xiii 



27 Yes, I have found you double in your dealings, 
to accord with your name." 6 Your very number was 
an augury not good. What prayer should I make in 
my anger, unless that rotten old age eat you away, 
and your wax grow colourless from foul neglect? 

XIII 

She is coming already over the ocean from her 
too-ancient husband b — she of the golden hair who 
with rimy axle brings the day. 

3 " Whither art thou hasting, Aurora ? Stay ! — so 
may his birds each year make sacrifice to the shades 
of Memnon their sire in the solemn combat ! c 'Tis 
now I delight to lie in the tender arms of my love ; 
if ever, 'tis now I am happy to have her close by my 
side. Now, too, slumber is deep and the air is cool, 
and birds chant liquid song from their slender throats. 
Whither art thou hasting, O unwelcome to men, 
unwelcome to maids ? Check with rosy hand the 
dewy rein ! 

11 " Before thy rising the seaman better observes 
his stars, and does not wander blindly in mid water ; 
at thy coming rises the wayfarer, however wearied, 
and the soldier fits his savage hands to arms. Thou 
art the first to look on men tilling the field with the 
heavy mattock ; thou art the first to summon the 
slow-moving steer beneath the curved yoke. Thou 
cheatest boys of their slumbers and givest them over 
to the master, that their tender hands may yield to 
the cruel stroke ; and likewise many dost thou send 

Ethiopia, sprang the Memnonides, birds which honoured him 
in the manner described. 

369 

H B 



OVID 



atque eadem sponsum multos 1 ante atria mittis, 

unius ut verbi grandia damna ferant. 
nec tu consulto, nee tu iueunda diserto ; 

oogitur ad lites surgere uterque novas. 
tUj cum feminei possint cessare labores, 

lanificam revocas ad sua pensa manuni. 
Omnia perpeterer — sed surgere mane puellas, 

quis nisi cui non est ulla ]>uella ferat ? 
optavi quotiens, ne nox tibi cedere vellet, 

ne fugerent vultus sidera mota tuos ! 
optavi quotiens, aut ventus frangeret axem, 

aut caderet spissa nube retentus equus ! 2 
invida, quo properas ? quod erat tibi filius ater, 

materni fuerat pectoris ille color. 
Titliono vellem de te narrare liceret ; 

femina non caelo turpior ulla foret. 
ilium dum refugis, longo quia grandior aevo, 

surgis ad invisas a sene mane rotas, 
at si, quern mavis, 3 Cephalum conplexa teneres, 

clamares : " lente currite, noctis equi !" 
Cur ego plectar amans, si vir tibi marcet ab annis 

num me nupsisti conciliante seni ? 
adspice, quot somnos iuvcni donarit amato 

Luna ! — neque illius forma secunda tuae. 
ipse deum genitor, ne te tarn saepe videret, 

commisit noctes in sua vota duas." 

1 So Withof: sponsum cultos P : sponsum consulti 
sponsum cives Pa.: atque vades sponsum stultos Ehw. 

2 31, 32 omitted by P s : 

quid, si Cephalio numquam flagraret araore ? 
an putat ignotam nequitiam esse suani ? 

3 ma-sis Iiiese : malis Merk.: magis P : manibus s. 

37° 



OVID 



Vos modo venando, modo rus geniale colendo 

ponitis in varia tempora longa mora. 10 
aut fora vos retinent aut unctae dona 1 palaestrae, 

flectitis aut freno colla sequacis equi ; 
nunc volucrem laqueo, nunc piscem ducitis liamo ; 

diluitur posito serior hora mero. 
his mihi summotae, vel si minus acriter urar, 15 

quod faciani, superest praeter amare nihil, 
quod superest facio, teque, o mea sola voluptas, 

plus quoque, quam reddi quod mihi possit, amo ! 
aut ego cum cara de te nutrice susurro, 

quaeque tuum, miror, causa moretur iter ; 20 
aut mare prospiciens odioso concita vento 

corripio verbis aequora paene tuis ; 
aut, ubi saevitiae paulum gravis unda remisit, 

posse quidem, sed te nolle venire, queror ; 
dumque queror lacrimae per amantia lumina 
nianant, 25 

pollice quas tremulo conscia siccat anus, 
saepe tui specto si sint in litore passus, 

inpositas taniquam servet harena notas ; 
utque rogem de te et scribam tibi, siquis Abvdo 

venerit, aut, quaero, siquis Abydon eat. 30 
quid referam, quotiens dem vestibus oscula, quas tu 

Hellespontiaca ponis iturus aqua? 
Sic ubi lux acta est et noctis amicior hora 

exhibuit pulso sidera clara die, 
protinus in summo vigilantia lumina tecto 35 

ponimus, adsuetae signa notamque viae, 
1 mane Bent. 

260 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



9 You men, now in the chase, and now husband- 
ing the genial acres of the country, consume long 
hours in the varied tasks that keep you. Either 
the market-place holds you, or the sports of the 
supple wrestling-ground, or you turn with bit the 
neck of the responsive steed ; now you take the bird 
with the snare, now the fish with the hook ; and the 
later hours you while away with the wine before you. 
For me who am denied these things, even were I less 
fiercely aflame, there is nothing left to do but love. 
What there is left, 1 do ; and you, O sole delight of 
mine, I love with even greater love than could be 
returned to me ! Either with my dear nurse I 
whisper of you, and marvel what can keep you from 
your way ; or, looking forth upon the sea, I chide 
the billows stirred by the hateful wind, in words 
almost your own ; or, when the heavy wave has a 
little laid aside its fierce mood, I complain that you 
indeed could come, but will not ; and while I com- 
plain tears course from the eyes that love you, and 
the ancient dame who shares my secret dries them 
with tremulous hand. Often I look to see whether 
your footprints are on the shore, as if the sand would 
keep the marks impressed on it ; and, that I may 
inquire about you, and write to you, I still am 
asking if anyone has come from Abydos, or if anyone 
is going to Abydos. Why tell how many times I 
kiss the garments you lay aside when making ready 
to stem the waters of the Hellespont? 

33 Thus, when the light is done and night's 
more friendly hour has driven out day and set forth 
the gleaming stars, straightway I place in the 
highest of our abode my watchful lamps, the signals 
to guide you on the accustomed way. Then, draw- 

261 



OVID 



tortaque versato ducentes stamina fuso 

feminea tardas fallimus arte moras. 
Quid loquar iuterea tarn longo tempore, quaeris ? 

nil nisi Leandri nomen in ore meo est. 40 
"iamne putas exisse domo mea gaudia, nutrix, 

an vigilant omnes, et timet ille suos ? 
iamne suas umeris ilium deponere vestes, 

pallade iam pingui tinguere membra putas ? " 
adnuit ilia fere ; 1 non nostra quod oscula curet, 45 

sed movet obrepens somnus anile caput, 
postque morae minimum "iam certe navigat," 
inquam, 

" lentaque dimotis bracchia iactat aquis." 
paucaque cum tacta perfeci stamina terra, 

an medio possis, quaerimus, esse freto. 50 
et modo prospicimus, timida modo voce precamur, 

ut tibi det faciles utilis aura vias ; 
auribus incertas voces captamus, et omnem 

adventus strepitum credimus esse tui. 
Sic ubi deceptae pars est mihi maxima noctis 55 

acta, subit furtim lumina fessa sopor, 
forsitan invitus mecum tamen, inprobe, dormis, 

et, quamquam non vis ipse venire, venis. 
nam modo te videor prope iam spectare natantem, 

bracchia nunc umeris umida ferre meis, . 60 
nunc dare, quae soleo, madidis velamina membris, 

pectora nunc iuncto nostra fovere sinu 
multaque praeterea linguae reticenda modestae, 

quae fecisse iuvat, facta referre pudet. 
me miseram ! brevis est haec et non vera 
voluptas ; 65 

nam tu cum somno semper abire soles. 

1 fore P Va>. 

262 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



ing with whirling spindle the twisted thread, with 
woman's art Ave beguile the slow hours of waiting. 

39 What, meanwhile, I say through so long a 
time, yon ask ? Naught but Leander's name is 
on my lips. " Do you think my joy has already 
come forth from his home, my nurse ? or are all 
waking, and does he fear his kin ? Now do you 
think he is putting off the robe from his shoulders, 
and now rubbing the rich oil into his limbs ? " She 
signs assent, most likely ; not that she cares for my 
kisses, but slumber creeps upon her and lets nod her 
ancient head. Then, after slightest pause, " Now 
surely he is setting forth on his voyage," I say, " and 
is parting the waters with the stroke of his pliant 
arms." And when I have finished a few strands 
and the spindle has touched the ground, 1 ask 
whether you can be mid way of the strait. And 
now I look forth, and now in timid tones I pray 
that a favouring breeze will give you an easy eourse ; 
my ears catch at uncertain notes, and at every 
sound I am sure thaf you have come. 

65 When the greatest part of the night has gone 
by for me in such delusions, sleep steals upon my 
wearied eyes. Perhaps, false one, you yet pass the 
night with me, though against your will ; perhaps 
you come, though yourself you do not wish to come. 
For now I seem to see you already swimming near, 
and now to feel your wet arms about my neck, and 
now to throw about your dripping limbs the accus- 
tomed coverings, and now to warm our bosoms in 
the close embrace — and many things else a modest 
tongue should say naught of, whose memory delights, 
but whose telling brings a blush. Ah me ! brief 
pleasures these, and not the truth ; for you are 

263 



OVID 



firmius, o, cupidi tandem coeamus amantes, 

nec careant vera gaudia nostra fide ! 
cur ego tot viduas exegi frigida noctes ? 

cur totiens a me, lente morator, 1 abcs ? 70 
est mare, confiteor, uondum tractabile nanti ; 

nocte sed hestenia lenior aura fuit. 
cur ea praeterita est ? cur non ventura timebas ? 

tarn bona cur periit, nec tibi rapta via est ? 
protinus ut similis detur tibi copia cursus, 75 

hoc melior certe, quo prior, ilia fuit. 
At eito mutata est iactati forma profundi. 

tempore, cum properas, saepe minore venis. 
hie, puto, deprensus nil, quod querereris, haberes, 

meque tibi amplexo nulla noceret hiemps. SO 
certe ego turn ventos audirem laeta sonantis, 

et numquam placidas esse precarer aquas, 
quid tamen evenit, cur sis metuentior undae 

contemptumque prius nunc vereare fretum ? 
nam memini, cum te saevum veniente minaxque 85 

non minus, aut multo non minus, aequor erat ; 
cum tibi clamabam : " sic tu temerarius esto, 

ne miserae virtus sit tua Henda mihi ! " 
unde novus timor hie, quoque ilia audacia fugit ? 

magnus ubi est spretis ille natator aquis ? 90 
Sis tamen hoc potius, quam quod prius esse solebas, 

et facias placidum per mare tutus iter— 
dummodo sis idem, dum sic, ut scribis, amemur, 

flammaque non fiat frigidus ilia cinis. 

1 morator FP 1 s : natator co P ? . 

264 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



ever wont to go when slumber goes. O more firmly let 
our eager loves be knit, and our joys be faithful and 
true ! Why have I passed so many cold and lonely 
nights? Why, O tardy loiterer, are you so often 
away from me ? The sea, 1 grant, is not yet fit for 
the swimmer ; but yesternight the gale was gentler. 
Why did you let it pass ? Why did you fear what 
was not to come ? Why did so fair a night go 
by for naught, and you not seize upon the way ? 
Grant that like chance for coming be given you 
soon ; this chance was the better, surely, since 'twas 
the earlier. 

77 But swiftly, you may say, the face of the storm- 
tossed deep was changed. Yet you often come in 
less time, when you are in haste. Overtaken here, 
you would have, methinks, no reason to complain, 
and while you held me close no storm would 
harm you. I surely should hear the sounding winds 
with joy, and should pray for the waters never 
to be calm. But what has come to pass, that you 
are grown more fearful of the wave, and dread the 
sea you before despised ? For I call to mind your 
coming once when the flood was not less fierce and 
threatening — or not much less ; when I cried to you : 
" Be ever rash with such good fortune, lest wretched 
I may have to wee]) for your courage ! " Whence 
this new fear, and whither has that boldness fled ? 
Where is that mighty swimmer who scorned the 
waters ? 

91 But no, be rather as you are than as you were 
wont to be before ; make your way when the sea is 
placid, and be safe — so you are only the same, so we 
only love each other, as you write, and that flame of 
ours turn not to chill ashes. I do not fear so much 



265 



OVID 



non ego tarn ventos timeo mea vota morantes, 95 

quam similis vento ne tuus erret amor, 
ne non sim tanti, superentque pericula causani, 

et videar merces esse labore minor. 
Interdum metuo, patria ne laedar et inpar 

dicar Abydeno Thressa puella toro. 100 
ferre tamen possum patientius omnia, quam si 

otia nescio qua paelice captus agis, 
in tua si veniunt alieni colla lacerti, 

fitque novus nostri finis amoris amor. 
r, potius peream, quam erimine vulnerer isto, 105 

fataque sint culpa nostra priora tua ! 
nec, quia venturi dederis mibi signa doloris, 

haec loquor aut fama sollicitata nova, 
omnia sed vereor — quis enim securus amavit ? 

eogit et absentes plura timere locus. 110 
felices illas, sua quas praesentia nossc 

crimina vera iubet, falsa timere vetat ! 
nos tarn vaua movet, quam facta iniuria fallit, 

incitat et morsus error uterque pares, 
o utinam venias, aut ut ventusve paterve 115 

causaque sit certe femina nulla morae ! 
quodsi quam sciero, moriar, mihi crede, dolendo ; 

iamdudum pecca, si mea fata petis ! 
Sed neque peeeabis, frustraque ego terreor istis, 

quoque minus venias, invida pugnat hiemps. 120 
me miseram ! quanto planguntur litora fluctu, 

et latet obscura condita nube dies ! 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



the winds that hinder my vows as I fear that like 
the wind your love may wander — that I may not 
be worth it all, that your perils may outweigh their 
cause, and I seem a reward too slight for your 
toils. 

99 Sometimes I fear my birthplace may injure 
me, and I be called no match, a Thracian maid, for a 
husband from Abydos. Yet could I bear with greater 
patience all things else than have you linger in the 
bonds of some mistress's charms, see other arms 
clasped round your neck, and a new love end the 
love we bear. Ah, may I rather perish than be 
wounded by such a crime, may fate overtake me 
ere you incur that guilt ! I do not say these 
words because you have given sign that such grief 
will come to me, or because some recent tale has 
made me anxious, but because I fear everything — 
for who that loved was ever free from care ? The 
fears of the absent, too, are multiplied by distance. 
Happy they whom their own presence bids know 
the true charge, and forbids to fear the false ! Me 
wrongs imaginary fret, while the real I cannot know, 
and either error stirs equal gnawings in my heart. 
O, would you only come ! or did I only know that 
the wind, or your father — at least, no woman — kept 
you back ! Were it a woman, and I should know, I 
should die of grieving, believe me ; sin against me 
at once, if you desire my death ! 

119 But you will not sin against me, and my 
fears of such troubles are vain. The reason you 
do not come is the jealous storm that beats you 
back. Ah, wretched me ! with what great waves 
the shores are beaten, and what dark clouds envelop 
and hide the day ! It may be the loving mother of 

267 



OVID 



forsitan ad puntum mater pia venerit Helles, 

mersaque roratis nata fleatur aquis — 
an mare ab inviso privignae nomine dictum 125 

vexat in aequoream versa noverca deam ? 
non favet, ut nunc est, 1 teneris locus iste puellis ; 

hac Helle periit, hae ego laedor aqua, 
at tibi flammarum memori, Neptune, tuarum 

null us erat ventis inpediendus amor — 130 
si neque Amymone nec, laudatissima forma, 

criminis est Tyro fabula vana tui, 
lucidaque Alcyone Calyeeque Hecataeone nata, 2 

et nondum nexis angue Medusa comis, 
flavaque Laudice caeloque recepta Celaeno, 135 

et quarum memini nomina lecta mihi. 
has certe pluresque canunt, Neptune, poetae 

molle latus lateri conposuisse tuo. 
cur igitur, totiens vires expertus amoris, 

adsuetum nobis turbine claudis iter? 140 
parce, ferox, latoque mari tua proelia misce ! 

seducit terras haec brevis unda duas. 
te decet aut magnas magnum iactare carinas, 

aut etiam totis classibus esse trucem ; 
turpe deo pelagi iuvenem terrere natantem, 145 

gloriaque est stagno quolibet ista minor, 
nobilis ille quidem est et clarus origine, sed non 

a tibi suspecto ducit Ulixe genus, 
da veniam servaque duos ! natat ille, sed isdem 

corpus Leandri, spes mea pendet aquis.* 150 

1 utcunique est DiKhey Ehw. 

2 ceuceque et aveone P : celiceque et aveone G : ceyce et 
aveone V : Calyeeque Ecatheone (Hecataeone) Hein. 

a Nephele, mother of Phrixns and Helle. 

6 Ino, second wife of Helle's father Athamas. 

" Such learned enumerations of the love adventures of 



268 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



Helle has corae to the sea, and is lamenting in down- 
pouring tears the drowning of her child " — or is the 
step-dame, turned to a goddess of the waters, vexing 
the sea that is called by her step-ehild's hated name ? 1 
This place, such as 'tis now, is aught but friendly 
to tender maids ; by these waters Helle perished, 
by them my own affliction comes. Yet, Neptune, 
wert thou mindful of thine own heart's flames, thou 
oughtst let no love be hindered by the winds — if 
neither Amymone, nor Tyro much bepraised for 
beauty, are stories idly eharged to thee, nor shining 
Alcyone, and Calyce, child of Hecataeon, nor Medusa 
when her locks were not yet twined with snakes, nor 
golden-haired Laodice and Celaeno taken to the 
skies, nor those whose names I mind me of having 
read. 6 These, surely, Neptune, and many more, the 
poets say in their songs have mingled their soft 
embraces with thine own. Why, then, dost thou, 
who hast felt so many times the power of love, close 
up with whirling storm the way we have learned to 
know ? Spare us, impetuous one, and mingle thy 
battles out upon the open deep ! These waters, that 
separate two lands, are scant. It befits thee, who art 
mighty, either to toss about the mighty keel, or to 
be fierce even with entire fleets ; 'tis shame for the 
god of the great sea to terrify a swimming youth — 
that glory is less than should come from troubling any 
pond. Noble he is, to be sure, and of a famous 
stoek, but he does not trace his line from the Ulysses 
thou dost not trust. Have merey on him, and save 
us both ! It is he who swims, but the limbs of 
Leander and all my hopes hang on the selfsame wave. 

gods appear to have been a form of poetry cultivated by the 
Alexandrines." Purser, in Palmer p. 47">. 

269 



OVID 



Sternuit en 1 lumen ! — posito nam scribimus illo — 

sternuit et nobis prospera signa dedit. 
ecce,, meruin nutrix faustos instillat in ignes, 

"eras " que " erimus plures/' inquit, et ipsa bibit. 
effice nos plures, evicta per aequora lapsus, 155 

o penitus toto corde recepte mihi ! 
in tua eastra redi, socii desertor amoris ; 

ponuntur medio cur mea membra toro ? 
quod timeaSj non est ! auso Venus ipsa favebit, 

sternet et aequoreas aequore nata vias. 160 
ire libet niedias ipsi mihi saepe per undas, 

sed solet hoc maribus tutius esse fretum. 
nam cur hac vectis Phrixo Phrixique sorore 

sola dedit vastis femina nomen aquis ? 
Forsitan ad reditum metuas ne tempora desint, 165 

aut gemini nequeas ferre laboris onus, 
at nos diversi medium coeamus in aequor 

obviaque in summis oscula dermis aquis, 
atque ita quisque suas iterum redeamus ad urbes ; 

exiguum, sed plus quam nihil illud erit ! 170 
vel pudor hie ittinam, qui nos clam cogit amare, 

vel timidus famae cedere vellet amor ! 
nunc male res iunctae, calor et reverentia, pugnant. 

quid sequar, in dubio est ; haec decet, ille iuvat. 
ut semel intravit Colchos Pagasaeus Iason, 175 

inpositam celeri Phasida puppe tulit ; 
ut semel Idaeus Lacedaemona venit adulter, 

cum praeda rediit protinus ille sua. 

1 et MSS.: en Bent. Hem. 

° She drops water into the flame of the lamp, either to 
clear the wick or to honour the omen. 



270 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



161 My lamp has sputtered, see ! — for I am writing 
with it near — it has sputtered and given us favour- 
ing sign. Look, nurse is pouring drops into auspicious 
fires. a "To-morrow," she says, " we shall be more," 
and herself drinks of the wine. Ah, do make us 
more, glide over the conquered wave, O you whom 
I have weleomed to all my inmost heart ! Come 
hack to cam]), deserter of your ally love ; why must 
I lay my limbs in the mid space of my couch ? 
There is naught for you to fear! Venus' self will 
smile upon your venture ; child of the sea, the paths 
of the sea she will make smooth. Oft am 1 prompted 
myself to go through the midst of the waves, but 
'tis the wont of this strait to be safer for men. For 
why, though Phrixus and Phrixus' sister both rode 
this way, did the maiden alone give name to these 
wide waters ? 

165 p er h a p S you fear the time may fail you for 
return, or you may not endure the effort of the 
twofold toil. Then let us both from diverse ways 
come together in mid sea, and give each other kisses 
on the waters' erest, and so return again each to his 
own town ; 'twill be little, but more than naught ! 
Would that either this shame that eompels us to 
secret loving would cease, or else the love that fears 
men's speeeh. Now, two things that ill go together, 
passion and regard for men, are at strife. Which 
I shall follow is in doubt ; the one becomes, the 
other delights. Once had Jason of Pagasae entered 
Colchis, and he set the maid of the Phasis in his 
swift ship and bore her off; once had the lover 
from Ida come to Lacedaemon, and he straight 
returned together with his prize. But you, as oft 

27 1 



OVID 



tu quam saepe petis, quod amas, tarn saepe relinquis, 

et quotiens grave sit 1 puppibus ire, natas. 180 
Sic tamen, o iuvenis tumidarum victor aquarum, 

sic facito spemas, ut vereare, fretum ! 
arte laboratae merguntur ab aequore naves ; 

tu tua plus remis bracchia posse putas ? 
quod cupis, hoc nautae metuunt, Leandre, natare ; 185 

exitus hie fractis puppibus esse solet. 
me miseram ! cupio non persnadere, quod hortor, 

sisque, precor, monitis fortior ipse meis — 
dummodo pervenias excussaque saepe per undas 

inicias umeris bracchia lassa meis ! 190 
Sed mihi, caeruleas quotiens obvertor ad undas, 

nescio quae pavidum frigora 2 pectus habet. 
nec minus hesternae confundor imagine noctis, 

quamvis est sacris ilia piata meis. 
namque sub aurora, iam dormitante lucerna, 195 

sonmia quo cerni tempore vera solent, 
stamina de digitis cecidere sopore remissis, 

collaque pulvino nostra ferenda dedi. 
hie ego ventosas nantem delphina per undas 

eernere non dubia sum mihi visa fide, 200 
quern postquam bibulis inlisit fluctus harenis, 

nnda simul miserum vitaque deseruit. 
quidquid id est, timeo ; nec tu mea somnia ride 

nec nisi tranquillo bracchia crede mari ! 
si tibi non parcis, dilectae parce puellae, 205 

quae numquam nisi te sospite sospes ero ! 

1 sit Vs Bent. Hons.: fit PG. 

2 So Bimn.: quorl P: quae VG : quid G„ : frigora V : 
frigore PG: habent s : ha/// V: habet PG. 

272 



THE HEROIDES XIX 



as you seek your love, so oft you leave her, and 
whene'er 'tis peril for boats to go, you swim. 

1S1 Yet, O my young lover, though victor over 
the swollen waters, so spurn the sea as still to be 
in fear of it! Ships wrought with skill are over- 
whelmed by the wave ; do you think your arms 
more powerful than oars ? What you are eager for, 
Leander — to swim — is the sailor's fear ; 'tis that 
follows ever on the wreck of ships. Ah, wretched 
me ! I am eager not to persuade you to what I 
urge ; may you be too strong, I pray, to yield to 
my admonition — only so you come to me, and cast 
about my neck the wearied arms oft beaten by the 
wave ! 

191 But, as often as I turn my face toward the 
dark blue wave, my fearful breast is seized by some 
hidden chill. Nor am I the less perturbed by a 
dream I had yesternight, though I have cleared 
myself of its threat by sacrifice. For, just before 
dawn, when my lamp was already dying down, 
at the time when dreams are wont to be true, 
my fingers were relaxed by sleep, the threads 
fell from them, and I laid my head down upon the 
pillow to rest. There in vision clear I seemed to 
see a dolphin swimming through the wind-tossed 
waters ; and after the flood had cast it forth upon 
the thirsty sands, the wave, and at the same time 
life, abandoned the unhappy thing. Whatever it 
may mean, I fear ; and you — nor smile at my 
dreams, nor trust your arms except to a tranquil 
sea ! If you spare not yourself, spare the maid 
beloved by you, who never will be safe unless you 
are so ! I have hope none the less that the waves 



273 

T 



OVID 



spes tamen est fractis vicinae pacis in undis ; 

tu 1 placidas toto 2 pectore finde vias ! 
interea nanti, 3 quoniam freta pervia non sunt, 

leniat invisas littera missa moras. 210 

XX 

ACONTIUS CYDIPPAE 

Pone metum ! nihil hie iterum iurabis amanti ; 

promissam satis est te semel esse mihi. 
perlege ! discedat sic corpore languor ab isto, 

quod meus est ulla parte dolere dolor ! 
Quid pudor ante subit ? nam, sicut in aede Dianae, 5 

suspicor ingenuas erubuisse genas. 
coniugium pactamque fidem, non crimina posco ; 

debitus ut coniunx, non ut adulter amo. 
verba licet repetas, quae demptus ab arbore fetus 

pertulit ad castas me iaciente manus ; 10 
invenies illic, id te spondere, quod opto 

te potius, virgo, quam meminisse deam. 
nunc quoque idem timeo, sed idem tamen acrius 
illud ; 

adsumpsit vires auctaque flamma mora est, 
quique fuit numquam parvus, nunc tempore longo 15 
et spe, quam dederas tu mihi, crevit amor. 

1 U\ PGw. turn Pa. 2 toto P Vu : tuto O x s. 

3 nanti s : nandi P G 1 . 

a In the temple of Diana at Delos, Acontius threw before 
Cydippe an apple inscribed: "I swear by the sanctuary 



274 



THE HER01DES XX 



are broken and peace is near ; do you cleave their 
paths while placid with all your might ! Meanwhile, 
since the billows will not let the swimmer come, let 
the letter that 1 send you soften the hated hours of 
delay. 

XX 

ACONTIUS TO CYDIPPE 

Lay aside your fears ! here you will give no second 
oath to your lover ; that you have pledged yourself 
to me once is enough. a Read to the end, and so 
may the languor leave that body of yours ; that it 
feel pain in any part is pain to me ! 

5 Why do your blushes rise before you read ? — for 
I suspect that, just as in the temple of Diana, your 
modest cheeks have reddened. It is wedlock with 
you that I ask, and the faith you pledged me, not a 
crime ; as your destined husband, not as a deceiver, 
do I love. You may recall the words which the 
fruit I plucked from the tree and threw to you 
brought to your chaste hands ; you will find that 
in them you promise me what I pray that you, 
maiden, rather than the goddess, will remember. 
I am still as fearful as ever, but my fear has grown 
keener than it was ; for the flame of my love has 
waxed with being delayed, and taken on strength, 
and the passion that was never slight has now grown 
great, fed by long time and the hope that you 
had given. Hope you had given ; my ardent 

of Diana that I will wed Acontius," which she read aloud, 
thus inadvertently pledging herself. 



275 

T 2 



OVID 



spem mihi tu dedcrus, incus hie tibi credidit ardor. 

11011 potes hoc factum teste riegare dea. 
adfuit et, praesens ut erat, tua verba notavit 

et visa est mota dicta tulisse 1 coma. 20 
Deceptam dicas nostra te fraud e licebit, 

dum fraudis nostra e causa feratur amor, 
fraus raea quid petiit, nisi uti tibi iungerer, unum ? 

id te^ quod quereris, conciliare potest, 
non ego natura nec sum tarn callidus usu ; 25 

sollertem tu me, crede, puelha, facis. 
te mihi conpositis — siquid tamen egimus — a me 

adstrinxit verbis ingeniosus Amor, 
dictatis ab eo feci sponsalia verbis, 

consultoque fui iuris Amore vafer. 30 
sit fraus huic facto nomen, dicarque dolosns, 

si tamen est, quod ames, vfelle tenere dolus ! 
En, iterum scribo mittoque rogantia verba ! 

altera fraus haec est, quodque queraris habes. 
si noceo, quod amo, fateor, sine fine nocebo 35 

teque petam ; caveas tu licet, usque 2 petam. 
per gladios alii placitas rapnere pnellas ; 

scripta mihi caute 3 littera crimen erit ? 
di faciant, possim plures inponere nodos, 

ut tna sit nulla libera parte fides ! 40 
mille doli restant — clivo sndamns in imo ; 

ardor inexpertum nil sinet esse meus. 
sit dubium, possisne capi ; captabere certe. 

exitus in dis est, sed capiere tamen. 

1 tulisse PGu Plan.{?) : probasse «. 

2 usque s : ipse Pw : ipsa G Vs. 3 astute Bent. 

276 



THE HEROIDES XX 



heart put trust in you. You cannot deny that this 
was so — the goddess is my witness. She was there, 
and, present as she was, marked your words, and 
seemed, by the shaking of her locks, to have accepted 
them. 

21 I will give you leave to say you were deceived, 
and by wiles of mine, if only of those wiles my love 
be counted cause. What was the object of my 
wiles but the one thing — to be united with you ? 
The thing you complain of has power to join you 
to me. Neither by nature nor by practice am I 
so cunning ; believe me, maid, it is you who make 
me skilful. It was ingenious Love who bound you 
to me, with words — if I, indeed, have gained aught — 
that I myself drew up. In words dictated by him 
I made our betrothal bond ; Love was the lawyer 
that taught me knavery. Let wiles be the name 
you give my deed, and let me be called crafty — if 
only the wish to possess what one loves be craft ! 

33 Look, a seeond time I write, inditing words 
of entreaty ! A second stratagem is this, and you 
have good ground for complaint. If I wrong you 
by loving, I confess I shall wrong you for ever, 
and strive to win you ; though you shun my suit, 
I shall ever strive. With the sword have others 
stolen away the maids they loved ; shall this letter, 
discreetly written, be called a crime ? May the 
gods give me power to lay more bonds on you, so 
that your pledge may nowhere leave you free ! 
A thousand wiles remain — I am only perspiring 
at the foot of the steep ; my ardour will leave 
nothing unessayed. Grant 'tis doubtful whether 
you can be taken ; the taking shall at least be tried. 
The issue rests with the gods, but you will be 



277 



OVID 



ut partem effugias, non omnia retia falles, 45 

quae tibi, quam eredis, plura tetendit Amor, 
si non proficient artes, veniemus ad anna, 

inque 1 tui cupido rapta ferere siuu. 
non sum, qui soleam Paridis reprehendere factum, 

nec quemquam, qui vir, posset ut esse, fuit. 50 
nos quoque — sed taceo ! mors huius poena rapinae 

ut sit, erit, quam te non habuisse, minor, 
aut esses formosa minus, peterere modeste ; 

audaces facie cogimur esse tua. 
tu facis hoc oculique tui, quibus ignea cedunt 55 

sidera, qui flammae causa fuere meae ; 
hoc faciunt flavi crines et eburnea cervix, 

quaeque, precor, veniant in mea colla manus, 
et decor et vultus 2 sine rusticitate jiudentes, 

et, Thetidis qualis vix rear esse, pedes. 60 
cetera si possem laudare, beatior essem, 

nec dubito, totum quin sibi par sit opus, 
hac ego conpulsus, non est mirabile, forma 

.si pignus volui vocis habere tuae. 
Denique, dum captam tu te cogare fateri, 65 

insidiis esto capta puella meis. 
invidiam patiar ; passo sua praemia dentur. 

cur suus a tanto crimine fructus abest ? 
Hesionen Telamon, Briseida cepit Achilles; 

utraque victorem nempe secuta virum. 70 
quamlibet accuses et sis irata licebit, 

irata liceat dum mihi posse frui. 

1 inque MSS.: vique Pa. 2 motns DiltTiey. 

278 



THE HEROIDES XX 



taken none the less. Yon may evade a part, but you 
will not escape all the nets which Love, in greater 
number than you think, has stretched for you. If 
art will not serve, I shall resort to arms, and you 
will be seized and borne away in the embrace that 
longs for you. I am not the one to chicle Paris for 
what he did, nor any one who, to become a husband, 
has been a man." I, too — but I say nothing ! Allow 
that death is fit punishment for this theft of you, 
it will be less than not to have possessed you. 
Or you should have been less beautiful, would you 
be wooed by modest means ; 'tis by your charms I am 
driven to be bold. This is your work — your work, 
and that of your eyes, brighter than the fiery stars, 
and the cause of my burning love ; this is the work 
of your golden tresses and that ivory throat, and the 
hands which 1 pray to have clasp my neck, and your 
comely features, modest yet not rustic, and feet 
which Thetis' own methinks could scarcely equal. 
If I could praise the* rest of your charms, I should be 
happier; yet I doubt not that the work is like in' all 
its parts. Compelled by beauty such as this, it is no 
cause for marvel if I wished the pledge of your word. 

66 In fine, so only you are forced to confess your- 
self caught, be, if you will, a maid caught by my 
treachery. The reproach I will endure — only let 
him who endures have his just reward. Why should 
so great a charge lack its due profit ? Telamon 
won Hesione, Briseis was taken by Achilles ; each of 
a surety followed the victor as her lord. You may 
chide and be angry as much as you will, if only you 
let me enjoy you while you are angry. 1 who cause 

. a ii yj r " j s usec \ ; n two senses — ' ' husband " and " man of 
courage." 

279 



OVID 



idem, qui facimus, factam tenuabimus iram, 

copia placandi sit modo parva tui. 
ante tuos liceat flentem 1 consistere vultus 75 

et liceat lacrimis addere verba sua, 2 
utque solent famuli, cum verbera saeva verentur, 

tendere submissas ad tua crura manus ! 
ignoras tua iura ; voca ! cur arguor absens ? 

iamdudum dominae more venire iube. 80 
ipsa meos scindas licet imperiosa capillos, 

oraque sint digitis livida nostra tuis. 
omnia perpetiar ; tantum fortasse timebo, 

corpore laedatur ne manus ista raeo. 
Sed neque conpedibus nec me conpesce catenis — 85 

servabor firmo vinctus amore tui ! 
cum bene se quantumque volet satiaverit ira, 

ipsa tibi dices : " quam patienter amat ! " - 
ipsa tibi dices, ubi videris omnia ferre : 

"tarn bene qui servit, serviataste mihi ! " 90 
nunc reus infelix absens agor, et mea, cum sit 

optima, non ullo causa tuente perit. 
Hoc quoque — quantumvis 3 sit scriptum iniuria 
nostrum, 

quod de me solo, nempe queraris habes. 
non meruit falli mecum quoque Delia ; si non 95 

vis mihi promissum reddere, redde deae. 
adfuit et vidit, cum tn decepta l-ubebas, 

et vocem memori condidit aure tuam. 
omina re careant ! nihil est violentius ilia, 

cum sua, quod nolim, numina laesa videt. 100 

1 fle7item G Vs Plan.: flentes P l : flentem liceat u<. 

2 sua Pa.: sni P : suis G: ineis co : tuis s. 

3 quantumvis Pa. at first : quod tu via G Pa. 

280 



THE HEROIDES XX 



it will likewise assuage the wrath I stirred, let me 
but have a slight ehance of appeasing you. Let 
me have leave to stand weeping before your face, 
and my tears have leave to add their own speech ; 
and let me, like a slave in fear of bitter stripes, 
stretch out submissive hands to touch your feet ! 
You know not your own right ; eall me ! Why 
am I accused in absence ? Bid me come, forthwith, 
after the manner of a mistress. With your own 
imperious hand you may tear my hair, and make my 
face livid with your fingers. I will endure all ; my 
only fear perhaps will be lest that hand of yours be 
bruised on me. 

85 But bind me not with shackles nor with 
chains — I shall be kept in bonds by unyielding love 
for you. When your anger shall have had full 
course, and is sated well, you will say to yourself : 
" How enduring is his love ! " You will say to your- 
self, when you have seen me bearing all : " He who 
is a slave so well, let him be slave to me !" Now, 
unhappy, I am arraigned in my absence, and my 
cause, though excellent, is lost because no one 
appears for me. 

93 This further — however much that writing of 
mine was a wrong to you, it is not I alone, you 
must know, of whom you have cause to complain. 
She of*Delos was not deserving of betrayal with 
me ; if faith with me you cannot keep, keep faith 
with the goddess. She was present and saw when 
you blnshed at being ensnared, and stored away 
your word in a remembering ear. May your 
omens be groundless ! Nothing is more violent 
than she when she sees — what I hope will not 
be ! — her godhead wronged. The boar of Calydon 

281 



OVID 



testis erit Calydonis aper, sic saevus, ut illo 

sit magis in natum saeva reperta parens, 
testis et Actaeon, quondum fera creditus illis, 

ipse dedit leto cum quibus ante feras ; 
quaeque superba parens saxo per corpus oborto 105 

nunc quoque Mygdonia flebilis adstat hnmo. 
Ei mihi ! Cydippe, timeo tibi dicere verum, 

ne videar causa falsa monere mea ; 
dicendum tamen est. hoc est, 1 mihi crede, quod 
aegra 

ipso nubendi tempore saepe iaces. 110 
consulit ipsa tibi, neu sis periura, laborat, 

et salvam salva te cupit esse fide, 
inde fit ut, quotiens existere perfida temptas, 

peccatum totiens corrigat ilia tuum. 
parce movere feros animosae virginis arcus ; 115 

mitis adhuc fieri, si patiare, potest, 
parce, precor, teneros corrumpere febribus artus ; 

servetur facies ista fruenda mihi. 
serventur vultus ad nostra incendia nati, 

quique subest niveo lenis 2 in ore rubor. 120 
hostibus et siquis, ne fias nostra, repugnat, 

sic sit ut invalida te solet esse mihi ! 
torqueor ex aequo vel te nubente vel aegra 

dicere nec possum, quid minus ipse velim ; 
maceror interdum, quod sim tibi causa dolenjdi 125 

teque mea laedi calliditate puto. 
in caput ut nostrum dominae periuria quaeso 

eveniant ; poena tuta sit ilia mea ! 

1 tu Ehw. 2 lenis Ps : levis o> : laetns s. 



° Meleager, whose mother Althaea's anger was inspired by 
Diana. 

* Niobe, with the children of whom she boasted, was slain 
282 



THE HEROIDES XX 



will be my witness — fierce, yet so that a mother a 
was found to be fiercer than he against her own 
son. Actaeon, too, will witness, once on a time 
thought a wild beast by those with whom himself 
had given wild beasts to deatli ; and the arrogant 
mother, her body turned to rock, who still sits 
weeping on Mygdonian soil. 6 

507 Alas me ! Cydippe, I fear to tell you the truth, 
lest I seem to warn you falsely, for the sake of my 
plea ; yet tell it I must. This is the reason, believe 
me, why you oft lie ill on the eve of marriage. 
It is the goddess herself, looking to your good, 
and striving to keep you from a false oath ; she 
wishes you kept whole by the keeping whole of 
your faith. This is the reason why, as oft as 
you attempt to break your oath, she corrects your 
sin. Cease to invite forth the cruel bow of the 
spirited virgin ; she still may be appeased, if only you 
allow. Cease, I entreat, to waste with fevers your 
tender limbs ; preserve those charms of yours for me 
to enjoy. Preserve those features that were born to 
kindle my love, and the gentle blush that rises to 
grace your snowy cheek. May my enemies, and any 
who would keep you from my arms, so fare as I when 
you are ill ! 1 am alike in torment whether you 
wed, or whether you are ill, nor can I say which I 
should wish the less ; at times I waste with grief 
at thought that I may be cause of pain to you, and 
my wiles the cause of your wounds. May the false 
swearing of my lady come upon my head, I pray ; 
mine be the penalty, and she thus be safe ! 

by Diana and Apollo. A " weeping Niobe " rock was pointed 
out in Mygdonia, a province of Phrygia. 
c The day was often postponed. 

283 



OVID 



Ne tamen ignorem, quid agas, ad limina crebro 

anxius hue illuc dissimulauter eo ; 130 
subseqnor ancillam furtim famul unique requirens, 

profuerint somni quid tibi quidve cibi. 
me miserum, quod non medicoruiii iussa ministro, 

effingoque manus, insideoque toro ! 
et rursus miserum, quod me procul hide remoto, 135 

quera mininie veil em, forsitan alter adest ! 
ille nianus istas effingit, et adsidet aegrae 

invisus superis cum superisque mihi, 
dumque suo temptat salientem pollice venaru, 

Candida per causam bracchia saepe tenet, 140 
contrectatque sinus, et forsitan oscula hmgit. 

officio merces plenior ista suo est ! 
Quis tibi permisit nostras praecerpere messes ? 

ad spes alterius quis tibi fecit iter ? 
iste sinus meus est ! mea turpiter oscula sumis ! 145 

a mihi promisso corpore tolle nianus ! 
inprobe, tolle nianus ! quani tangis, nostra futura 
est ; 

postmodo si facies istud, adulter eris. 
elige de vacuis quani non sibi vindicet alter ; 

si nescis, dominum res habet ista suum. 150 
nee mihi credideris — recitetur formula pacti ; 

neu falsam dicas esse, fac ipsa legat ! 
alterius thalamo, tibi nos, tibi dicimus, exi ! 

quid facis hie ? exi ! non vacat iste torus ! 
284 



THE HEROIDES XX 



129 Nevertheless, that I may not be ignorant of how 
you tare, now here, now there, I oft walk anxiously 
in secret before your door ; I follow stealthily 
the maid-slave and the lackey, asking what change 
for good your sleep has brought, or what your 
food. Ah me, wretched, that I may not be the 
one to carry out the bidding of your doctors," 
and may not stroke your hands and sit at the side of 
your bed ! and again wretched, because when I am 
far removed from you, perhaps that other, he whom 
I least could wish, is with you ! He is the one 
to stroke those dear hands, and to sit by you while 
ill, hated by me and by the gods above — and 
while he feels with his thumb your throbbing 
artery, he oft. makes this the excuse for holding 
your fair, white arm, and touches your bosom, and, it 
may be, kisses you. A hire like this is too great for 
the service given ! 

143 Who gave you leave to reap my harvests before 
me ? Who laid open the road for you to enter 
upon another's hopes ? That bosom is mine ! mine 
are the kisses you take ! Away with your hands 
from the body pledged to me ! Scoundrel, away 
with your hands ! She whom you touch is to be 
mine ; henceforth, if you do that, you will be 
adulterous. Choose from those who are free one 
whom another does not claim ; if you do not know, 
those goods have a master of their own. Nor need 
you take my word — let the formula of our pact be 
recited ; and, lest you say 'tis false, have her read 
it herself! Out with you from another's chamber, 
out with you, I say ! What are you doing there ? 
Out ! That couch is not free ! Because you, too, 
" Administer the prescriptions. 

23 5 



OVID 



nam quod habes et tu gemini vei'ba altera pacti, 1 55 

non erit idcirco par tua causa ineae. 
haec mihi se pepigit, pater hane tibi, primus 
ab ilia ; 

sed propior certe quam pater ipsa sibi est. 
promisit pater hanc, haec et iuravit amanti ; 

ille homines, haec est testificata deam. 160 
hie metuit mendax, 1 haec et periura vocari ; 

an dubitas, hie sit maior an ille metus ? 
denique, ut amborum conferre pericula possis, 

respice ad eventus — haec cubat, ille valet, 
nos quoque dissimili certamina mente subimus ; 165 

nec spes par nobis nec timor aequus adest. 
tu petis ex tuto ; gravior mihi morte repulsa est, 

idque ego iam, quod tu forsan amabis, amo. 
si tibi iustitiae, si recti cura fuisset, 

cedere debueras ignibus ipse meis. 170 
Nunc, quoniam ferus hie pro causa pugnat iniqua, 

ad quid, Cydippe, littera nostra redit ? 
hie facit ut iaceas et sis suspecta Dianae ; 

hunc tu, si sapias, limen adire vetes. 
hoc faciente subis tam saeva pericula vitae — 175 

atque utinam pro te, qui movet ilia, cadat ! 
quern si reppuleris, nec, quern dea damnat, amaris, 

tu tunc continuo, certe ego salvus ero. 
siste metum, virgo ! stabili potiere salute, 

fac modo polliciti conscia templa colas ; 180 
non bove mactato caelestia numina gaudent, 

sed, quae praestanda est et sine teste, fide. 

1 So P S G \ t oj : ille timet mendax Dilthey P l in erasure. 



THE HEROIDES XX 



have the words of a second pact, the twin of mine, 
your case will not on that account be equal with 
mine. She promised herself to me, her father her 
to } r ou ; he is first after her, but surely she is 
nearer to herself than her father is. Her father 
but gave promise of her, while she, too, made 
oath — to her lover ; he called men to witness, she 
a goddess. He fears to be called false, she to be 
called forsworn also ; do you doubt which — this or 
that — is the greater fear ? In a word, even grant 
you could compare their hazards, regard the issue — 
for she lies ill, and he is strong. You and I, too, are 
entering upon a contest with different minds ; our 
hopes are not equal, nor are our fears the same. 
Your suit is without risk ; for me, repulse is heavier 
than death, and I already love her whom you, 
perhaps, will come to love. If you had cared for 
justice, or cared for what was right, you yourself 
should have given my passion the way. 

171 Now, since his hard heart persists in its unjust 
course, Cydippe, to what conclusion does my letter 
come ? It is he who is the cause of your lying 
ill and under suspicion of Diana ; he is the one 
you would forbid your doors, if you were wise. 
It is his doing that you are facing such dire 
hazards of life — and would that he who causes them 
might perish in your place ! If you shall have 
repulsed him and refused to love one the goddess 
damns, then straightway you — and I assuredlv — 
will be whole. Stay your fears, maiden ! You will 
possess abiding health, if only you honour the 
shrine that is witness of your pledge ; not by slain 
oxen are the spirits of heaven made glad, but 
by good faith, which should be kept even though 

287 



OVID 



ut valeant aline, ferrum patiuntur et ignes, 

fert aliis tristeni sucus amarus openi. 
nil opus est istis ; tantum periuria vita 185 

teque simul serva meque datamque fidem ! 
praeteritae veniam dabit ignorantia culpa e — 

exciderant animo foedera lecta tuo. 
admonita es modo voce mea cum 1 casibus istis, 

quos, quotiens temptas fallere, ferre soles. 190 
his quoque vitatis in partu nempe rogabis, 

ut tibi luciferas adferat ilia maims ? 
audiet haec — repetens quae sunt audita, requiret, 

iste tibi de quo coniuge partus eat. 
promittes votum — scit te promittere falso : 195 

iurabis — scit te fallere posse deos ! 
Non agitur de me ; cura maiore laboro. 

anxia sunt vitae pectora nostra tuae. 
cur modo te dubiam pavidi flevere parentes, 

ignaros culpae quos facis esse tuae ? 200 
et cur ignorent ? matri licet omnia narres. 

nil tua, Cydippe, facta ruboris 2 babent. 
ordine fac referas ut sis mihi cognita primum 

sacra pliaretratae dum facit ipsa deae ; 
ut te conspecta subito, si forte notasti, 205 

restiterim fixis in tua membra genis ; 
et, te dum nimium miror, nota certa furoris, 

deciderint umero pallia lapsa meo 3 ; 
postmodo nescio qua venisse volubile malum, 

verba ferens doctis insidiosa notis, 210 

1 cum Hous.: modo MSS. - pudoris s. 

3 humeris . . . nieis Plnn.{?) JJTerX*. Secll. Ehw. 

" A frequent epithet of Diana. 

288 



THE HEROIDES XX 



without witness. To win their health, some maids 
submit to steel and fire ; to others, bitter juices 
bring their gloomy aid. There is no need of these ; 
only shun false oaths, preserve the. pledg'e you have 
given — and so yourself, and me ! Excuse for past 
offence your ignorance will supply — the agreement 
you read had fallen from your mind. You have 
but now been admonished not only by word of 
mine, but as well by those mishaps of health you 
are wont to suffer as oft as you try to evade your 
promise. Even if you escape these ills, in child-birth 
will you dare pray for aid from her light-bringing a 
hands ? She will hear these words — and then, 
recalling what she has heard, will ask of you from 
what husband eome those Jiangs. You will promise 
a votive gift — she knows your promises are false ; 
you will make oath — she knows you ean deceive 
the gods ! 

197 'Tis not a matter of myself ; the care I labour 
with is greater. It is concern for your life that 
fills my heart. Why, but now when your life was 
in doubt, did your frightened parents weep with 
fear, whom you keep ignorant of your crime ? And 
why should they be ignorant ? — you could tell your 
mother all. What you have done, Cydippe, needs 
no blush. See you relate in order how you first 
became known to me, while she was herself making 
sacrifice to the goddess of the quiver; how at sight 
of you, if perchance you noticed, I straight stood 
still with eyes fixed on your charms ; and how, 
while I gazed on you too eagerly — sure mark of 
love's madness — my cloak slipped from my shoulder 
and fell ; how, after that, in some way came the 
rolling apple, with its treacherous words in clever 

289 

u 



OVID 



quod quia sit lectum sancta praesente Diana, 

esse tuam vinetani n limine teste fidehi 
ne tamen ignoret, seripti sententia quae sit, 

leeta tibi quondam nunc quoque verba refer. 
" nube, precor/' dicet, "cui te bona minima 

iungunt ; 215 

quern fore iurasti, sit gener ille mibi. 
quisquis is est, placeat, quoniam placet ante Dianae ! " 

talis erit mater, si modo mater erit. 
Sed tamen ut quaerat 1 quis sim qualisque, videto. 

inveniet vobis consuluisse deam. 220 
insula, Coryciis quondam celeberrima nymphis, 

cingitur Aegaeo, nomine Cea, mari. 
ilia mihi patria est ; nee, si generosa probatis 

nomina, despectis arguor ortus avis, 
sunt et opes nobis, sunt et sine crimine mores ; 225 

amplius utque nihil, me tibi iungit Amor, 
appeteres talem vel non iurata maritum ; 

iuratae vel non talis babendus erat. 
Haec tibi me in somnis iaculatrix scribere Phoebe ; 

haec tibi me vigilem scribere iussit Amor ; 230 
e quibus alterius mihi iam nocuere sagittae, 

alterius noceant ne tibi tela, cave ! 
iuncta salus nostra est — miserere meique tuique ; 

quid dubitas imam ferre duobus opem ? 
quod si contigerit, cum iam data signa sonabunt, 235 

tinctaque votivo sanguine Delos erit, 
1 ut quaerat s : et quaerat co. 

" For the beginning of the eeremonj'. 

* The sacrifices attendant upon Acontius' marriage to 
Cydlppe. 



290 



THE HEROIDES XX 



character ; and how, because they were read in 
holy Diana's presence, you were bound by a pledge 
with deity to witness. For fear that after all she 
may not know the import of the writing, repeat now 
again to her the words once read by you. "Wed, 
I pray," she will say, " him to whom the good gods 
join you ; the one you swore should be, let be my 
son-in-law. Whoever he is, let him be our choice, 
since he was Diana's choice before ! " Such will be 
your mother's word, if only she is a mother. 

219 And yet, see that she seeks out who I am, and 
of what ways. She will find that the goddess had 
you and yours at heart. An isle once thronged by 
the Coryeian nymphs is girdled by the Aegean sea ; 
its name is Cea. That is the land of my fathers ; 
nor, if you look with favour on high-born names, 
am I to be charged with birth from grandsires of no 
repute. We have wealth, too, and we have a name 
above reproach ; and, though there were nothing 
else, I am bound to you by Love. You would aspire 
to such a husband even though you had not sworn ; 
now that you have sworn, even though he were not 
such, you should accept him. 

22y These words Phoebe, she of the darts, bade 
me in my dreams to write you ; these words in my 
waking hours I.ove bade me write. The arrows 
of the one of them have already wounded me ; 
that the darts of the other wound not you, take 
heed! Your safety is joined with mine — have 
compassion on me and on yourself ; why hesitate to 
ajd us both at once ? If you shall do this, in the 
day when the sounding signals" will be given and 
Delos be stained with votive blood, & a golden image 



291 

u 2 



OVID 



aurea ponetur mali felicis imago, 

causaque versiculis scripta duobus erit : 

EFFIGIE POMI TESTATUR ACONTIUS 11UIUS 

QUAE FUERINT IN EO SCRIPTA FUISSE RATA. 240 

Longior infirmum ne lasset epistula corpus 
clausaque consueto sit sibi fine : vale ! 



XXI 

CVDIPPE ACONTIO 

Pertimui, script um que tuum sine murmure legi, 

iuraret ne quos inscia lingua deos. 
et puto captasses iterum, nisi, ut ipse fateris, 

promissam scires me satis esse semel. 
nec lectura ful, sed, si tibi dura fuissem, 5 

aucta foret saevae forsitan ira deae. 
omnia cum faciam, cum dem pia turn Dianae, 

ilia tamen iusta plus tibi parte favet, 
utque cupis credi, memori te vindicat ira ; 

talis in Hippolyto vix fuit ilia suo. 10 
at melius virgo favisset virginis annis, 

quos vereor paucos ne velit esse mihi. 1 
Languor enim causis non apparentibus haeret ; 

adiuvor et nulla fessa medentis ope. 
quam tibi nunc gracilem vix haec rescribere 

quamque 15 

pallida vix cubito membra levare putas ? 

1 Good MSS. and Plan, do not contain 13 — end. 

a The chaste favourite of the goddess, courted by Phaedra, 
who compassed his death because of his refusal. See iv. 



292 



THE HERO IDES XXI 



of the blessed apple shall be offered up, and the cause 
of its offering shall be set forth in verses twain : 

I3V THIS IMAGE OF THE APPLE DOTH ACOXTIUS DECLARE 
THAT WHAT ONCE WAS WRITTEN ON IT NOW HATH 
HAD FULFILMENT FAIR. 

That too long a letter may not weary your 
weakened frame, and that it may close with the 
aeeustomed end : fare well ! 

XXI 

CvDIPPE TO AcONTIUS 

All fearful, I read what you wrote without so 
much as a murmur, lest my tongue unwittingly 
might swear by some divinity. And I believe you 
would have tried to snare me a seeond time, did 
you not know, as you yourself eonfess, that one 
pledge from me was enough. I should not have 
read at all ; but had I been hard with you, the 
anger of the eruel goddess might have grown. 
Though I clo everything, though 1 offer duteous 
ineense to Diana, she none the less favours you 
more than your due, and, as you are eager for me 
to believe, avenges you with unforgetting anger ; 
scarce was she sueh toward her own Hippolytus.® 
Yet the maiden goddess had done better to favour 
the years of a maiden like me — years which I fear 
she wishes few for me. 

13 For the languor clings to me, for causes that do 
not appear ; worn out, I find no help in the 
physician's art. How thin and wasted am I now, 
think you, searee able to write this answer to you ? 



293 



OVID 



nunc timor accedit, ne quis nisi conscia nutrix 

colloquii nobis sentiat esse vices, 
ante fores sedet haec quid agamque rogantibus intus, 

ut passim tuto scribere, "dormit," ait. 20 
mox, ubi, secreti longi causa optima, somnns 

credibilis tarda desinit esse mora, 
iamque venire videt qnos non admittere durum est, 

excreat et ficta dat mihi signa nota. 
sicut erant, pi*opei'ans verba inperfecta relinquo, 25 

et tegitur trepido littera coepta 1 sinu. 
inde meos digitos iterum repetita fatigat ; 

qnantus sit nobis adspicis ipse labor, 
quo peream si dignus eras, ut vera loqnamur ; 

sed melior iusto quamque mereris ego. 30 
Ergo te propter totiens incerta salutis 

commentis poenas doque dedique tnis ? 
haec nobis formae te laudatore superbae 

contingit merces ? et placuisse nocet ? 
si tibi deformis, quod mallem, visa fuissem, 35 

culpatum nulla corpus egeret ope ; 
nunc landata gemo, nunc me certamine vestro 

perditis, et proprio vulneror ipsa bono, 
dum neque tu cedis, nec se putat ille secundum, 

tn votis obstas illins, ille tuis. 40 
ipsa velut navis iactor quam certus in altum 

propellit Boreas, aestus et unda refert, 
1 cauta MSS.: coepta Dilthey. 

294 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



and how pale the body I scarce can raise upon 
my arm ? And now I feci an added fear, lest 
someone besides the nurse who shares my secret 
may see that we are interchanging words. She 
sits before the door, and when they ask how I 
do within, answers, "She sleeps," that I may write 
in safety. Presently, when sleep, the excellent 
exeuse for my long retreat, no longer wins belief 
because I tarry so, and now she sees those coming 
whom not to admit is hard, she clears her throat 
and thus gives me the sign agreed upon. Just 
as they are, in haste I leave my words un- 
finished, and the letter I have begun is hid in my 
trembling bosom. Taken thence, a second time it 
fatigues my fingers ; how great the toil to me, 
yourself can see. May I perish if, to speak truth, 
you were worthy of it ; but I am kinder than is just 
or you deserve. 

31 So, then, 'tis on your account that I am so 
many times uncertain of health, and 'tis for your 
lying tricks that I am and have been punished ? 
Is this the reward that falls to my beauty, proud 
in your praise ? Must I suffer for having pleased ? 
If I had seemed misshapen to you — and would 1 
had ! — you would have thought ill of my body, and 
now it would need no help ; but I met with 
praise, and now I groan ; now you two with your 
strife are my despair, and my own beauty itself 
wounds me. While neither you yield to him nor 
he deems him second to you, you hinder his 
prayers, he hinders yours. I myself am tossed like 
a ship which steadfast Boreas drives out into the 
deep, and tide and wave bring back, and when the 



295 



OVID 



cumque dies caris optata parentibus instut, 

inmodieus pariter corporis ardor adest — 
ei mihi, couiugii tempus crudelis ad ipsum 45 

Persephone nostras pulsat acerba fores ! 
iam pudet, et timeo, qnamvis mihi conscia non sim, 

offensos videar ne meruisse deos. 
accidere haec aliquis casn contendit, at alter 

acceptum superis hunc negat esse virnm ; 50 
neve nihil credas in te quoque dicere famam, 

facta veneficiis pars putat ista tuis. 
causa latet, mala nostra patent ; vos pace movetis 

aspera submota proelia, plector ego ! 
Die mihi 1 nunc, solitoque tibi ne decipe more : 55 

quid facies odio, sic ubi amore noces ? 
si laedis, quod amas, hostem sapienter amabis — 

rae, precor, ut serves, perdere velle velis ! 
aut tibi iam nulla est speratae cura puellae, 

quam ferns indigna tabe perire sinis, 60 
ant, dea si frustra pro me tibi saeva rogatur, 

quid mihi te iactas ? gratia nulla tua est ! 
elige, qnid fingas : non vis placare Dianam — 

inmemor es nostri ; non potes — ilia tui est ! 
Vel nnmquam mallem vel non mihi tempore in 
illo G5 

esset in Aegaeis cognita Delos aquis ! 
tunc mea difficili deducta est aequore navis, 

et fuit ad coeptas hora sinistra vias. 
quo pede processi ! qno me pede limine movi ! 

pi eta citae tetigi quo pede texta ratis ! 70 

1 dicam MSS.: die a! Pa.: die mihi Bent. 



296 



a Eager and spirited. 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



day longed for by my parents dear draws nigh, at 
the same time unmeasured burning seizes on my 
frame — ah me, at the very time of marriage cruel 
Persephone knocks at my door before her day ! 
I already am shamed, and in fear, though I feel 
no guilt within, lest I appear to have merited the 
displeasure of the gods. One contends that my 
affliction is the work of chance ; another says that 
my destined husband finds not favour with the 
gods ; and, lest you think yourself untouched by 
what men say, there are also some who think you 
the eause, by poisonous arts. Their source is hidden, 
but my ills are clear to see ; you two stir up fierce 
strife and banish peace, and the blows are mine ! 

55 Tell me now, and deceive me not in your 
wonted way : what will you do from hatred, when 
you harm me so from love ? If you injure one you 
love, 'twill be reason to love your foe — to save me, 
I pray you, will to wish my doom ! Either you care 
no longer for the hoped-for maid, whom with hard 
heart you are letting waste away to an unworthy 
death, or if in vain you beseech for me the eruel 
goddess, why boast yourself to me? — you have no 
favour with her! Choose which case you will : you 
do not wish to placate Diana — you have forgotten 
me ; you have no power with her — 'tis she has 
forgotten you ! 

05 I would I had either never — or not at that 
time — known Delos in the Aegean waters ! That 
was the time my ship set forth on a difficult sea, and 
I entered on a voyage in ill-omened hour. With 
what step" I came forth ! With what step I started 
from my threshold ! The painted deck of the 
swift ship — with what step I trod it ! Twice, 



297 



OVID 



bis tamen adverso redierunt carbasa vento — 

mention a demens ! ille secundus erat ! 
ille secundus erat qui me referebat euntem, 

quique parum felix inpediebat iter, 
atque utinam constans contra mea vela fuissct — 75 

sed stultum est venti de levitate queri. 
Mota loci fama properabam visere Delon 

et facere ignava puppe videbar iter, 
quam saepe ut tardis feci convicia remis, 

questaque sum vento lintea parca dari ! 80 
et iam transieram Myconon, iam Tenon et Andron, 

inqiie meis oculis Candida Delos erat; 
quam procul ut vidi, "quid me fugis, insula," dixi, 

"laberis in magno numquid, ut ante, mari ?" 
Institeram terra e, cum iam prope luce peracta 85 

demere purpureis sol iuga vellet equis. 
quos idem solitos postquam revocavit ad ortus, 

comuntur nostrae matre iubente comae, 
ipsa dedit gemmas digitis et crinibus aurum, 

et vestes umeris induit ipsa meis. 90 
protinus egressae superis, quibus insula sacra est, 1 

flava salutatis tura merumque damns ; 
dumque parens aras votivo sanguine tingit, 

festaque fumosis ingerit exta focis, 
sedula me nutrix alias quoque ducit in aedes, 95 

erramusque vago per loca sacra pede. 
et modo porticibus spatior modo munera regum 

miror et in cunctis stantia signa locis ; 

1 grata est Ps Bent. 

298 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



none the less, my canvas put about before an 
adverse wind — ah, senseless that I am, I lie ! — a 
favouring wind was that ! A favouring wind it was 
that brought me back from my going, and hindered 
the way that had little happiness for me. Ah, would 
it had been constant against my sails — but it is 
foolish to complain of fickle winds. 

77 Moved by the fame of the place, I was in eager 
haste to visit Delos, and the craft in which I sailed 
seemed spiritless. How oft did I chide the oars for 
being slow, and complain that sparing canvas was 
given to the wind ! And now I had passed Myconos, 
now Tenos and Andros, and Delos gleamed a before 
my eyes. When I beheld it from afar, " Why dost 
thou fly from me, O isle ? " I cried ; "art thou afloat 
in the great sea, as in days of yore ? " 

S5 I had set foot upon land ; the light was almost 
gone, and the sun was making ready to take their 
yokes from his shining steeds. When he has like- 
wise called them once more to their accustomed 
rising, my hair is dressed at the bidding of my 
mother. With her own hand she sets gems upon 
my fingers and gold in my tresses, and with her own 
hand places the robes about my shoulders. Straight- 
way setting forth, we greet the deities to whom the 
isle is consecrate, and offer up the golden incense 
and the wine ; and while my mother stains the 
altars with votive blood, and piles the solemn entrails 
on the smoking altar-flames, my busy nurse conducts 
me to other temples also, and we stray with wander- 
ing step about the holy precincts. *And now I walk 
in the porticoes, now look with wonder on the gifts 
of kings, and the statues standing everywhere ; I 
" The Creek islands are masses of limestone. 

299 



OVID 



miror et inrmmeris structam de eornibus aram, 

et de qua pariens arbore nixa dea est, 100 
et quae praeterea — neque enim meminive libetve 

quidquid ibi vidi dieere — Delos habet. 
Forsitan haec spectans a te spectabar, Aconti, 

visaque simplicitas est mea posse capi. 
in templum redeo gradibus sublime Diana e — 105 

tutior hoc eequis debuit esse locus ? 
mittitur ante pedes malum cum carmine tali — 

ei mi hi, inravi nunc quoque paene tibi ! 
sustulit hoc nutrix mirataque "perlege ! " dixit. 

insidias legi, magne poeta, tuas ! 110 
nomine coniugii dicto confusa pudore, 

sensi me totis erubuisse genis, 
luminaque in gremio veluti defixa tenebam — 

lumina propositi facta ministra tui. 
inprobe, quid gaudes ? aut quae tibi gloria parta 

est? 115 

quidve vir elusa virgin e laudis habes ? 
non ego constiteram sumpta peltata securi, 

qualis in Iliaco Penthesilea solo ; 
nullus Amazonio caelatus balteus auro, 

sicut ab Hippolyte, praeda relata tibi est. 120 
verba quid exultas tua si mihi verba dederunt, 

sumque parum prudens capta jmella dolis ? 
Cydippen pomum, pomum Schoeneida cejiit ; 

tu nunc Hijipomenes scilicet alter eris ! 

A great wonder in its time ; built by Apollo of the horns 
of his sister's saerifieial victims. 

b Latona, mother of Apollo and Diana. 

c Penthesilea and Hippolyte were queens of the Amazons ; 



300 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



look with wonder, too, on the altar bnilt of countless 
horns/ and the tree that stayed the goddess in her 
throes/ and all things else that Delos holds — for 
memory would not serve, nor mood allow, to tell of 
all I looked on there. 

103 Perhaps, thus gazing, I was gazed upon by you, 
Acontius, and my simple nature seemed an easy prey. 
I return to Diana's temple, with its lofty approach 
of steps — ought any place to be safer than this ? — 
when there is thrown before my feet an apple with 
this verse that follows — ah me, now again I almost 
made oath to you ! Nurse took it up, looked in 
amaze, and " Read it through ! " she said. I read 
your treacherous verse, O mighty poet ! At mention 
of the name of wedlock I was confused and shamed, 
and felt the blushes cover all my face, and my eyes 
I kept upon my bosom as if fastened there — those 
e}*es that were made ministers to your intent. 
Wretch, why rejoice ? or what glory have you 
gained ? or what praise have you won, a man, by 
playing on a maid ? I did not present myself before 
you with buckler and axe in hand, like a Penthesilea 
on the soil of Ilion ; no sword-girdle, chased with 
Amazonian gold, was offered you for spoil by me, as 
by some Hippolyte." Why exult if your words de- 
ceived me, and I, a girl of little wisdom, was taken 
by your wiles ? Cydippe was snared by the apple, an 
apple snared Schoeneus' child ; d you now of a truth 
will be a second Hippomenes ! Yet had it been 

the former was slain by Achilles at Troy, the latter's sword- 
belt was won by Hercules as his sixth labour, and she was 
given by him in marriage to Theseus for his aid. 

d Atalanta, who lost the race by stopping for the golden 
apples dropped by Hippomenes. 



301 



OVID 



at fuerat melius, si te puer iste tenebat, 125 

quern tu nescio quas dicis habere faces, 1 
more bonis solito spem non corrumpere fraude ; 

exoranda tibi, non capienda fui ! 
Cur, me cum peteres, ea non profitenda putabas, 

propter quae nobis ipse petendus eras ? 130 
cogere cur potius quam persuadere volebas, 

si poteram audita condicione capi ? 
quid tibi nunc prodest iurandi formula iuris 

linguaque praesentem testifieata deam ? 
quae iurat, mens est. nil coniuravimus ilia ; 135 

ilia fidem dictis addere sola potest, 
consilium prudensque animi sententia iurat, 

et nisi iudicii vincula nulla valent. 
si tibi coniugium volui promittere nostrum, 

exige polliciti debita iura tori ; 140 
sed si nil dedimus praeter sine pectore vocem, 

verba suis frustra viribus orba tenes. 
non ego iuravi — legi iurantia verba ; 

vir mihi non isto more legendus eras, 
decipe sic alias — succedat epistula porno ! 145 

si valet hoc, magnas ditibus 2 aufer opes ; 
fac iurent reges sua se tibi regna daturos, 

sitque tuum toto quidqnid in orbe placet ! 
maior es hoe ipsa multo, mihi crede, Diana, 

si tua tarn praesens littera numen habet. 150 
Cum tamen haec dixi, cum me tibi firnia negavi, 

cum bene promissi causa peracta mei est, 
confiteor, timeo saevae Latoidos iram 

et corpus laedi suspicor inde meum. 

1 vices Dilthey Ehw. 2 ditibus Hein.: divilis J\fSS. 
102 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



better for you — if that boy really held you captive 
who you say has certain torches — to do as good men 
are wont, and not cheat your hope by dealing falsely ; 
you should have won me by persuasion, not taken 
me whether or no ! 

129 Why, when you sought my hand, did you not 
think worth declaring those things that made your 
own hand worth my seeking ? Why did you wish 
to compel me rather than persuade, if I could be 
Avon by listening to your suit ? Of what avail 
to yoti now the formal words of an oath, and the 
tongue that called on present deity to witness ? It 
is the mind that swears, and I have taken no oath 
with that; it alone can lend good faith to words. 
It is counsel and the prudent reasoning of the soul 
that swear, and, except the bonds of the judgment, 
none avail. If I have willed to pledge my hand to you, 
exact the due rights of the promised marriage-bed ; 
but if I have given you naught but my voice, without 
my heart, you possess in vain but words without a 
force of their own. I took no oath — I read words 
that formed an oath ; that was no way for you to be 
chosen to husband by me. Deceive thus other maids 
— let a letter follow an apple ! If this plan holds, 
win away their great wealth from the rich ; make 
kings take oath to give their thrones to you, and let 
whatsoever pleases you in all the world be yours ! 
You are much greater in this, believe me, than 
Diana's self, if your written word has in it such 
present deity. 

151 Nevertheless, after saying this, after firmly re- 
fusing myself to you, after having finished pleading 
the cause of my promise to you, I confess I fear the 
anger of Leto's eruel daughter and suspect that from 

303 



OVID 



nam quare, quotiens socialia sacra parantur, 155 

nupturae totiens languida membra cadunt ? 
ter mihi iam venieus positas Hymenaeus ad aras 

fugit, et a thalami limine terga dedit, 
vixque manu pigra totiens infusa resurgunt 

lumina, vix moto corripit igne faces. 160 
saepe coronatis stillant imguenta capillis 

et traliitur multo splendida palla croco. 
cum tetigit limen, lacrimas mortisque timorem 

cernit et a eultu multa remota suo, 
proicit ipse sua deductas fronte coronas, 165 

spissaque de nitidis tergit amoma comis ; 
et pudet in tristi laetum consurgere turba, 

quique erat in palla, transit in ora rubor. 1 
At mihi, vae miserae ! torrentur febribus artus 

et gravius iusto pallia pondus habent, 170 
nostraque plorantes video super ora parentes, 

et face pro thalami fax mihi mortis adest. 
parce laboranti, picta dea laeta pharetra, 

daque salutiferam iam mihi fratris opem. 
turpe tibi est, ilium causas depellere leti, 1 75 

te contra titulum mortis habere meae. 
numquid, in umbroso cum velles fonte lavari, 

inprudens vultus ad tua labra tuli ? 
praeteriine tuas de tot caelestibus aras, 

aque tua est nostra spreta parente parens ? 180 
1 167, 16S before 165 Merle. 

a A reference to Oeneus, whose neglect of Diana caused the 
coming of the Calydonian boar. 



3°4 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



her comes my body's ill. For why is it that, as oft 
as the sacraments for marriage are made ready;, so 
oft the limbs of the bride-to-be sink down in 
languor ? Thrice now has Hymenaeus come to 
the altars reared for me and fled, turning his 
back upon the threshold of my wedding-chamber ; 
the lights so oft replenished by his lazy hand 
scarce rise again, scarce does he keep the torch 
alight by waving it. Oft does the perfume distil 
from his wreathed locks, and the mantle he 
sweeps along is splendid with much saffron. 
When he has touched the threshold, and sees 
tears aiid dread of death, and much that is far 
removed from the ways lie keeps, with his own 
hand lie tears the garlands from his brow and 
casts them forth, and dries the dense balsam from 
his glistening locks ; lie shames to stand forth 
glad in a gloomy throng, and the blush that was 
in his mantle passes to his cheeks. 

169 But for me — all, wretched ! — my limbs are 
parched with fever, and the stuffs that cover me are 
heavier than their wont ; I see my parents weeping 
over me, and instead of the wedding-torch the torch 
of death is at hand. Spare a maid in distress, O 
goddess whose joy is the painted quiver, and grant 
me the health-bringing aid of thy brother ! It is 
shame to thee that he drive away the causes of 
doom, and that thou, in contrast, have credit for my 
death. Can it be that, when thou didst wish to bathe 
in shady pool, I without witting cast eyes upon thee 
at thy batli ? Have I passed thy altars by, among 
those of so many deities of heaven ? rt Has thy mother 
been scorned by mine ? b I have sinned in naught 
6 Niobe's boast of her children to Leto. 



3°5 

x 



OVID 



nil ego peccavi, nisi quod peri una legi 

inque parum fausto carmine docta fui. 
Tu quoque pro nobis, si non mentiris amorem, 

tura feras ; prosint, quae nocuere, manus ! 
cur, quae succenset quod adhuc tibi pacta puella 185 

non tua sit, fieri ne tua possit, agit ? 
omnia de viva tibi sunt speranda ; quid aufert 

saeva mihi vitam, spem tibi diva mei ? 
Nec tu credideris illuin, cui destinor uxor, 

aegra superposita membra fovere manu. 190 
adsidet ille quidem, quantum pemiittitur, ipse 

sed meminit nostrum virginis esse torum. 
iam quoque nescio quid de me sensisse videtur ; 

nam lacrimae causa saepe latente cadunt, 
et minus audacter blauditur et oscula rara 195 

appetit 1 et timido me vocat ore suam. 
nec miror sensisse, notis cum prodar apertis ; 

in dextrum versor, cum venit ille, latus, 
nec loquor, et tecto simulatur lumine somnus, 

captantem tactus reicioque manum. 200 
ingemit et tacito suspirat pectore. me quod 

offensain, quainvis non mereatur, habet. 
ei mihi, quod gaudes, et te iuvat ista voluntas ! 2 

ei mihi, quod sensus sum tibi fassa meos ! 
si mihi lingua foret, 3 tu nostra iustius ira, 205 

qui mihi tendebas retia, dignus eras. 
Scribis. ut invalidum liceat tibi visere corpus. 

es procul a nobis, et tamen inde noces. 
mirabar quare tibi nomen Acontius esset ; 

quod faciat longe vulnus, acumen habes. 210 

1 appetit Pa.: accipit 2ISS.: admovet Dilthey Ehw.: 
applicat IIous. 

- voluntas J. F. Heusinger : ista voluntas P: ipsavoluptas 
Dilthey. 3 So Lv. ei mihi lingua labat Ehic: etc. 



306 



THE HERO IDES XXI 



except that I have read a false oath, and been clever 
with unpropitious verse. 

1S3 Do you, too, if your love is not a lie, offer up 
incense for me ; let the hands help which harmed 
me ! Why does the hand which is angered because 
the maiden pledged you is not yet yours so act that 
yours she cannot become ? While still I live you 
have everything to hope; why does the cruel goddess 
take from me my life, your hope of me from you ? 

1S9 Do not believe that he whose destined wife 
I am lavs his hand on me to fondle my sick limbs. 
He sits by me, indeed, as much as he may, but does 
not forget that mine is a virgin bed. He seems 
already, too, to feel in some way suspicion of me ; 
for his tears oft fall for some hidden cause, his 
flatteries are less bold, he asks for few kisses, and 
calls me his own in tones that are but timid. Nor 
do I wonder he suspects, for I betray myself by 
open signs ; I turn upon my right side when he 
comes, and do not speak, and close my eyes in 
simulated sleep, and when he tries to touch me I 
throw off his hand. He groans and sighs in his 
silent breast, for he suffers my displeasure without 
deserving it. Ah me, that you rejoice and are 
pleased by that state of my will ! Ah me, that I 
have confessed my feelings to you ! If my tongue 
should speak my mind, 'twere you more justly de- 
served my anger — you, for having spread the net 
for me. 

207 You write for leave to come and see me in 
my illness. You are far from me, and yet you wrong 
me even from there. I marvelled why your name 
was Acontius ; it is because you have the keen point 



3°7 

x 2 



OVID 



certe ego convalui nondum de vulnere tali, 

ut iaculo seriptis eminus icta tuis. 
quid tamen hue venias ? sane miserabile corpus, 

ingenii videas magna 1 tropaea tui ! 
concidimus macie ; color est sine sanguine, qua- 

lem 215 

in pomo refero mente fuisse tuo, 
Candida nec mixto sublucent ora rubore. 

forma novi talis marmoris esse solet ; 
argenti color est inter convivia talis, 

quod tactum gelidae frigore pallet aquae. 220 
si me nunc videas, visam prius esse negabis, 

"arte nee est," dices, "ista petita mea," 
promissique fidem, ne sim tibi iuncta, remittes, 

et cupies illud non meminisse deam. 
forsitan et facies iurem ut contraria rursus, 225 

quaeque legam mittes altera verba mihi. 
Sed tamen adspiceres vellem, quod et ipse l-oga- 
bas — 

adspiceres sj)onsae languida membra tuae ! 
durius et ferro cum sit tibi pectus, Aconti, 

tu veniam nostris vocibus ipse petas. 230 
ne tamen ignores ope qua revalescere possim, 

quaeritur a Delphis fata canente deo. 
is quoque nescio quam, nunc ut vaga fama susurrat, 

neclectam queritur testis habere fidem. 
hoc deus, hoc vates, hoc et mea carmina dicunt — 235 

at desunt voto carmina nulla tuo ! 
unde tibi favor hie ? nisi si 2 nova forte reperta est 

quae capiat magnos littera lecta deos. 

1 magna Dilthey : bina L : digna mn Loinep. 

2 si Pa.: quod L : forte nova iru. 



308 



a 'Akovtwv, a javelin, iacuhim. 

6 I.e. pray for the remission of my oath. 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



that deals a wound from afar." At any rate, I am 
not yet well of just such a wound, for I was pierced 
by your letter, a far-thrown dart. Yet why should 
you come to me ? Surely but a wretched body you 
would see — the mighty trophy of your skill. I have 
wasted and fallen away : my colour is bloodless, such 
as I recall to mind was the hue of that apple of 
yours, and my face is white, with no rising gleam 
of mingled red. Such is wont to be the fairness of 
fresh marble ; such is the colour of silver at the 
banquet table, pale with the chill touch of icy water. 
Should you see me now, you will declare you have 
never seen me before, and say : " No arts of mine 
e'er sought to win a maid like that." You will remit 
me the keeping of my promise, in fear lest I become 
yours, and will long for the goddess to forget it all. 
Perhaps you will even a second time make me 
swear, but in contrary wise, and will send me words 
a second time to read. 

227 But none the less I could wish you to look 
upon me, as you yourself entreated — to look upon 
the languid limbs of your promised bride ! Though 
your heart were harder than steel, Acontius, you 
yourself would ask pardon for my uttered words. 6 
Yet, that you be not unaware, the god who sings 
the fates at Delphi is being asked by what means 
I may grow strong again. He, too, as vague rumour 
whispers now, complains of the neglect of some 
pledge he was witness to. This is what the god 
says, this his prophet, and this the verses I read 
— surely, the wish of your heart lacks no support in 
prophetic verse ! Whence this favour to you ? — 
unless perhaps you have found some new writing 
the reading whereof ensnares even the mighty gods. 



3°9 



OVID 



teque tenentc deos nuraen sequor ipsa deovum, 

doque libens victas in tua vota manus ; 210 
fassaque sum matri deceptae foedera linguae 

lumina fixa tenens plena pudoris humo. 
cetera eura tua est ; plus hoc quoque virgine factum, 

non timuit tecum quod mea charta loqui. 
iam satis invalid os calamo lassavimus avtus, 245 

et manus officium longius aegra negat. 
quid, nisi quod cupio me iam coniungere tecum, 

restat ? ut adscribat littera nostra : Vale. 



THE HEROIDES XXI 



And since you hold bound the gods, I myself follow 
their will, and gladly yield my vanquished hands in 
fulfilment of your prayers ; with eyes full of shame 
held fast on the ground, I have confessed to my 
mother the pledge my tongue was trapped to 
give. The rest must be your care ; even this, that 
my letter has not feared to speak with you, is more 
than a maid should do. Already have I wearied 
enough with the pen my weakened members, and 
my sick hand refuses longer its office. What remains 
for my letter, if 1 say that 1 long to be united with 
you soon ? nothing but to add : Fare well ! 



II 

THE AMORES 



MANUSCRIPTS AND EDITIONS 
OF THE AM ORES. 



1. Codex Parisinus 8242, formerly called Puteanus, 

of the eleventh century, the best manuscript. 
It contains I. ii. 51 — III. xii. 26; xiv. 3 — xv. 8. 

2. Codex Parisinus 7311 Regius, of the tenth 

century. It contains I. i. 3 — ii. 49. 

3. Codex Sangallensis 864, of the eleventh 

century. It contains I. — III. ix. 10, with 
omission of I. vi. 46 — viii. 74. 

The Amorcs were printed first in the two editiones 
principes of Ovid in 1471 — one at Rome, and the 
other at Bologna, with independent texts. A 
Venetian edition appeared in 1491. They appeared 
in Heinsius in 1661. 

The principal modern editions of the Amoves are 
those of Heinsius-Burmann, Amsterdam, 1727 ; 
Lemaire, Paris, 1820 ; Merkel-Ehwald, Leipzig, 
1888; Riese, 1889; Postgate's Corpus Poetarum 
Latinomm, 1894 ; Nemethy, Budapest, 1907 ; Brandt, 
Leipzig, 1911. 



3M 



SIGNS AND ABBREVIATIONS 



P. — Parisinus. 

S. = Sangallensis. 
Hein. = Heinsius. 
Merk. = Merkel. 
Ehw. = Ehwald. 



Burm. = Burmann. 
Post. - Postdate. 
Nem. = Nemetliy. 

Pa. = Palmer. 

Br. = Brandt. 



3'5 



IN APPRECIATION OF THE 
AM ORES 



The reader •will not look to the Amores for pro- 
fundity of any sort, whether of thought or emotion. 
Except in a general way* they are not even the 
expression of personal experience, to say nothing of 
depth of passion. Corinna is only one of several loves 
to whom the poet pays literary court, and it is more 
than doubtful whether even she is real. 

It is exactly this absence of the serious that gives 
the Amores their peculiar charm — a charm different 
from that of either Catullus, whose passion is real, or 
Tibullus and Propertius, who also sing in somewhat 
serious strain. For all of his much loving, the poet 
of the Amores is philosophic in love, and his light- 
hearted freedom from its pains finds light and airy ex- 
pression. No small number of them, indeed, are but 
slightly connected with love, and only a very few, as 
I. vii. and III. xi., seem prompted by anything that 
approaches genuine feeling. The Amores are above 
all the product of poetic fancy ; the poet's experi- 
ence with love of course contributes, and contributes 
abundantly — but it only contributes ; it is the 
element that serves for the fusing of his artist's 
instinct with the literature of love with which his 
mind is saturated — the poetry of his Greek and 
Roman predecessors. 

The heart that indites the matter of the Amores is 
no less free from suspicion of heaviness than the hand 
that obeys the heart ; their language is limpid, 
smooth, and flowing, fit medium of their fluent and 

316 



THE AMORES 111. x 



of our oracles,* brought forth the acorn ; this, and 
the herb that sprang- from the tender turf, were his 
food. 'Twas Ceres first taught the seed to swell 
in the fields, and cut with sickle the coloured locks 
of the corn ; 'twas she first made the steer bend 
neck to the yoke, and turned with the share's curved 
tooth the ancient mould. 

15 Does any think this a goddess to joy in the 
tears of lovers, and to see fit worship in the torments 
of lying apart ? However much she loves her fruitful 
fields, she is yet no simple rustic, nor has heart void 
of love. The Cretans will be my witness — and the 
Cretans are not wholly false. 6 Crete is the land 
proud of the nurture of Jove. 'Twas there that he 
who sways the starry heights of the world drank 
in the milk with the tender mouth of a little child. 

23 We have great faith in their witness — witness 
approved by their foster-son. Ceres herself, I think, 
will own to my impeachment. Under Cretan Ida 
the goddess had seen lasius with sure hand piercing 
the wild beast's side. She looked on him, and when 
her tender heart had caught the fire, she was victim 
now of shame, and now again of love. Her shame 
was overcome by love ; you might see the furrows 
of the field grown dry and the sown grain return- 
ing with seantest part of itself. When the well- 
wielded mattock had wrought upon the acre, and 
the hooked share had broken the dour glebe, and 
the seed had gone forth* equal over the broad 
plowed fields, the deluded husbandman had vowed 
in vain. The goddess potent over increase dallied 
in the dee]) woods ; fallen from her long tresses 
were the woven spikes of corn. Crete only was 
fruitful with fecund year ; wherever the goddess 

487 



OVID 



ipse 1 locus lienioninij canebat frugibus Ide, 2 

et ferns in silva farra metebat aper. 40 
optavit Minos similes sibi legifer annos, 

optavit, Cereris longus ut esset amor. 
Quod tibi secubitus tristes, dea flava, fuissent, 

hoc cogor sacris nunc ego ferre tuis ? 
cur ego sim tristis, cum sit tibi nata reperta 45 

regnaque quam Iuno sorte minore regat ? 
festa dies Veneremque vocat cantusque merumque ; 

haec decet ad dominos munera ferre deos. 

XI a 

Multa diuque tuli ; vitiis patientia victa est ; 

cede fatigato pectore, turpis amor ! 
scilicet adserui iam me fugique catenas, 

et quae non puduit ferre, tnlisse pudet. 
vicimus et domitum pedibus calcamus amorem ; 5 

venerunt capiti cornua sera meo. 
perfer et obdura ! 3 dolor hie tibi proderit olim ; 

saepe tulit lassis sucus amarus opem. 
Ergo ego sustinui, foribus tarn saepe repulsus, 

ingenuum dura ponerS corpus humo ? 10 
ergo ego nescio cui, quern tu conplexa tenebas, 

excubui clausam servus ut ante domum ? 

1 ipsa Ntm. 2 Ide vulgr. Idae P. 
3 So vidg.: perferre obdura, P x Merk. 

488 



THE AMORES III. xi 



had bent her step, all was rich with the garner ; t 
Ida, the very home of forests, was white with 
harvest, and the wild boar reaped the grain in the 
woodland. Minos, giver of laws, wished for seasons 
ever like this, wished that Ceres' love might long 
endure. 

43 Because tying apart was sad for thee, O golden 
Goddess, must I now suffer thus on thy holy day ? 
Why must I be sad, when for thee thy daughter 
is found,' 1 and reigns o'er realms of lesser state than 
only Juno's ? A festal day calls for love, and songs, 
and wine ; these are the gifts that are fitly tendered 
the gods our masters. 

XI a 

Much have I endured, and for long time ; my 
wrongs have overcome my patience ; withdraw from 
my tired-out breast, base love ! Surely, now I 
have claimed my freedom, and fled my fetters, 
ashamed of having borne what I felt no shame while 
bearing. Victory is mine, and I tread under foot my 
conquered love ; courage has entered my heart, 
though late. Persist, and endure ! this smart will 
some day bring thee good ; oft has bitter potion 
brought help to the languishing. 

9 Can it be I" have endured it — to be so oft 
repulsed from your doors, and to lay my body down, 
a free born man, on the hard ground ? Can it be 
that, for some no one you held in your embrace, 
I have lain, like a slave keeping vigil, before your 
tight-closed home ? I have seen when the lover 
" Proserpina. 

489 



OVID 



vidi, cum foribus lassus prodiret amator, 

invalidum referens emeritumque latus ; 
hoc tamen est levins, quam quod sum visus ab 
illo— 15' 

eveniat nostris hostibus ille pudor ! 
Quando ego non fixus lateri patienter adhaesi, 

ipse tuus custos, ipse vir, ipse comes ? 
scilicet et populo per me comitata 1 placebas ; 

causa fuit multis noster amoris amor. 20 
turpia quid referam vanae mendacia linguae 

et periuratos in mea damna deos ? 
quid iuvenum tacitos inter convivia nutus 

verbaque eonpositis dissimulata notis ? 
dicta erat aegra mihi — praeccps amensque cucurri ; 25 

veni, et rivali non erat aegra meo ! 
His et quae taceo duravi saepe ferendis ; 

quaere alium pro me, qui queat ista pati. 
iam mea votiva puppis redimita corona 

lenta tumescentes aequoris audit aquas. 30 
desine blanditias et verba, potentia quondam, 

perdere — non ego sum stultus, ut ante fui ! 2 

b 

Luctantur pectusque leve in contraria tendunt 
hac amor hac odium, sed, j)uto, vincit amor. 

odero, si potero ; si non, invitus amabo. 35 
nec iuga taurus a mat ; quae tamen odit, liabet. 

nequitiam fugio — fugientem forma reducit ; 
aversor morum crimina — corpus amo. 

1 comitata P: cantata Burnt , from Frcuicf. M,S. 

2 Mueller makes the division. 

49° 



THE AMORES III. xi 



came forth from your doors fatigued, with frame 
exhausted and weak from love's campaign ; yet this 
is a slighter thing than being seen by him — may 
shame like that befall my enemies ! 

17 When have I not in patience clung close to your 
side, myself your guard, myself your lover, myself 
your companion ? Be sure, too, that people liked 
you because you were at my side ; my love for you 
has won you love from many. Why repeat the 
shameful lies of your empty tongue, and recall the 
perjured oaths to the gods you have sworn to my 
undoing ? Why tell of the silent nods of young 
lovers at the banquet board, and of words eoneealed 
in the signal agreed upon ? Say I had been told she 
was ill — headlong and madly I ran to her ; I came, 
and she was not ill — to my rival ! 

27 Oft bearing such-like things, and others I say 
naught of, I have hardened ; seek another in my 
stead who can submit to them. Already my eraft 
is decked with votive wreath, and listens undisturbed 
to the sea's swelling waters. Cease wasting your 
earesses, and the words that once had weight — I am 
not a fool, as once I was ! 

b 

Struggling over my tickle heart, love draws it now 
this way, and now hate that — but love, I think, is 
winning. I will hate, if I have strength ; if not, 
I shall love unwilling. The ox, too, loves not the 
yoke ; what he hates he none the less bears. I fly 
from your baseness — as I fly, your beauty draws me 
back ; I shun the wickedness of your ways — your 

491 



OVID 



sic ego nec sine te nec tecum vivere possum, 

et videor voti nescius esse mei. 
aut formosa fores minus, aut minus inproba, vellen 

non facit ad mores tarn bona forma malos. 
facta merent odium, faeies exorat amorcm — 

me miserum, vitiis plus valet ilia suis ! 
Parce, per o lecti socialia iura, per omnis 

qui dant fallendos se tibi saepe deos, 
perque tuam faciem, magni mihi numinis instar, 

perque tuos oculos, qui rapuere meos ! 
quidquid eris, mea semper eris ; tu selige tantum, 

me quoque velle velis, anne coactus amem ! 
lintea dem potius ventisque ferentibus utar, 

ut, 1 quamvis nolim, cogar amare velim. 



XII 

Quis fuit ille dies, quo tristia semper amanti 

omina non albae concinuistis aves ? 
quodve putem sidus nostris occurrere fatis, 

quosve deos in me bella movere querar ? 
quae modo dicta mea est, quam coepi solus amare, 

cum multis vereor ne sit habenda mihi. 
Fallimur, an nostris innotuit ilia libellis ? 

sic erit — ingenio prostitit ilia raeo. 
et merito ! quid enim formae praeconia feci ? 

vendibilis culpa facta puella mea est. 

1 ut MSS.: quam Bautenbery. 



THE AMORES III. xii 



person I love. Tims I can live neither with you 
nor without, and seem not to know my own heart's 
prayer. I would you were either less beauteous or 
less base ; beauty so fair mates not with evil ways. 
Your actions merit hate, your face pleads winningly 
for love — ah ! wretched me, it has more power than 
its owner's misdeeds. 

45 Spare me, O by the laws of love's comradeship, 
by all the gods who oft lend themselves for you to 
deceive, and bv that face of yours, to me the image 
of high divinity, and by your eyes, that have taken 
captive mine ! Whatever you be, mine ever will 
you be ; choose you only whether you wish me also 
willing, or to love because constrained ! Let me 
rather spread my sails and use the favouring breeze, 
that I may wish, though against my will, for love's 
constraint. 



XII 

What day was that, ye birds not white, on which 
you chanted omens ill-boding to the poet ever in 
love ? or what ill star shall I think is rising on my 
fate, or what gods shall I complain are moving war 
against me ? She who but now was called my own, 
whom I began alone to love, must now, I fear, be 
shared with many. 

7 Am I mistaken, or is it my books of verse 
have made her known ? So will it prove — 'tis my 
genius has made her common. And I deserve it ! 
for why was I the crier of her beauty ? Through 
my fault she I love has become a thing of sale. I 



493 



OVID 



me lenone placet, duce me perductus amator, 

iamia per nostras est adaperta maims. 
An prosint, dubium, nocuerunt carmina semper ; 

invidiae nostris ilia fuere bonis, 
cum Thebe, cum Troia foret, cum Caesaris acta, 15 

ingenium movit sola Corinna raeuni. 
aversis utinam tetigissem carmina Musis, 

Phoebus et inceptum destituisset opus ! 
Nec tamen ut testes mos est audire poetas ; 

malueram verbis pondus abesse meis. 20 
per nos Scylla patri caros furata capillos 

pube ])remit rapidos 1 inguinibusque canes; 
nos pedibus pinnas dedimus, nos crinibus angues ; 

victor Abantiades alite fertur equo. 
idem j)er spatium Tityon porreximus ingens, 25 

et tria vipereo fecimus ora cani ; 
f'ecimus Enceladon iaculantem mille lacertis, 

ambiguae captos virginis ore viros. 
Aeolios Ithacis inclusimus utribus Euros ; 

proditor in medio Tantalus amne sitit. 30 
de Niobe silicem, de virgine fecimus ursam. 

concinit Odrysium Cecropis ales Ityn ; 
Iuppiter aut in aves aut se transformat in aurum 

aut secat inposita virgine taurus aquas. 
Protea quid referam Thebanaque semina, dentes ; 35 

qui vomerent Mammas ore, fuisse boves ; 

1 rabidos vulg.; rapidos P. 

a Scylla, daughter of Nisus, king of Megara, took from her 
father's head the purple lock on which his life depended, 
and was afterward changed to the monster. 

b Perseus and Mercury ; Medusa ; Perseus, Pegasus, and 
Andromeda. 



494 



THE AMORES III. xii 



am the pander has helped her to please, I have been 
guide to lead the lover, by my hand has her door 
been opened. 

13 Whether verses are good for aught, I doubt; 
they have always been my bane, and stood in the 
light of my good. Though there was Thebes, though 
Troy, though Caesar's deeds, Corinna only has stirred 
my genius. Would that the Muses had looked away 
when I first touched verse, and Phoebus refused me 
aid when my attempt was new ! 

19 And yet 'tis not the custom to heed the poet's 
witness ; my verses, too, I had preferred should 
have no weight. 'Twas we poets made Scylla steal 
from her sire a his treasured locks, and hide in her 
groin the devouring dogs ; 'tis we have placed wings 
on feet, and mingled snakes with hair ; our song 
made Abas' child a victor with the winged horse. 6 
We, too, stretched Tit} r os out through a mighty 
space, and gave to the viperous dog three mouths; 
we made Enceladus, hurling the spear with a thousand 
arms, and the heroes snared by the voice of the 
doubtful maid. c We shut in the skins of the Ithacan 
the East-winds of Aeolus ; made the traitor Tantalus 
thirst in the midst of the stream. Of Niobe we made 
a rock, and turned a maiden to a bear. d 'Tis due to 
us that the bird of Cecrops e sings Odrysian Itys ; 
that Jove transforms himself now to a bird, and now 
to gold, or cleaves the waters a bull with a maiden 
on his back. Why tell of Proteus, and those Theban 
seeds, the dragon's teeth ; that cattle once there 
were that spewed forth flames from their mouths ; 

c The Sirens. 

d Callisto, transformed by Juno and placed in the sky by 
Jove as Ursa Major. ' Philomela, the nightingale. 



495 



OVID 



flere genis electra tuas, Amiga, sorores ; 

quaeque rates fuerint, nunc maris esse deas ; 
aversumque diem mensis furialibus Atrei, 

duraque percussam saxa secuta lyram ? 40 
Exit in imnensum fecunda licentia vatimij 

obligat historica nec sua verba fide, 
et mea debuerat falso laudata videri 

femina ; eredulitas nunc mihi vestra nocet. 

XIII 

Cum mihi pomiferis coniunx foret orta Faliscis, 

moenia contigimus victa, Camille, tibi. 
casta sacerdotes Iunoni festa parabant 

per celebres ludos indigenanique bovem ; 
grande morae pretium ritus cognosce^ quamvis 5 

difficilis clivis hue via praebet iter. 
Stat vetus et densa praenubilus arbore lucus ; 

adspice — concedas nuinen inesse loco. 1 
accipit ara preces votivaque tnra piorum — 

ara per antiquas facta sine arte manus. 10 
hinc, ubi praesonuit sollemni tibia cantu, 

it per velatas annua pompa vias ; 
ducuntur niveae populo plaudente iuvencae^ 

quas aluit campis herba Falisca suis, 
et vituli nondum metuenda fronte minaces, 15 

et minor ex humili victima porcus hara, 
1 numinis esse locum vuhj. 

" The sisters of Phaethon, the charioteer, were changed to 
trees, and their tears to amber. 



496 



THE AM ORES III. xiii 



of thy sisters, Auriga, weeping tears of amber o'er 
their cheeks a ; of what were ships, but now are 
goddesses of the sea 6 ; of the ill-starred day at 
Atreus' maddened tables, and the rocks that followed 
at stroke of the lyre ? 

41 Measureless pours forth the creative wantonness 
of bards, nor trammels its utterance with history's 
truth. My praising of my lady, too, you should have 
taken for false ; now your easy trust is my undoing. 

XIII 

Since she I wed was sprung from the fruit-bearing 
Faliscan town, it chanced Ave came to the walls 
brought low, Camillus, by thee. The priestesses were 
making ready chaste festival to Juno, with solemn 
games and a cow of native stock ; 'twas well worth 
while to tarry and learn the rites, though the way 
thither is a toilsome road with steep ascents. 

7 There stands an ancient sacred grove, all dark 
with shadows from dense trees ; behold it — you would 
agree a deity indwelt the place. An altar receives 
the prayers and votive incense of the faithful — an 
artless altar, upbuilt by hands of old. From here, 
when the pipe has sounded forth in solemn strain, 
advances over carpeted ways the annual pomp ; snowy 
heifers are led along mid the plaudits of the crowd, 
heifers reared in their native meadows of Faliscan 
grass, and calves that threaten with brow not yet to 
be feared, and, lesser victim, a pig from the lowly sty, 

* Aeneas' ships, transformed that Turnus might not burn 
them. 

c Usually called Falerii. Its site is occupied by Civite 
Castellana. 

497 



OVID 



duxque gregis cornu per tempora dura recurvo. 

invisa est dominae sola capella deae ; 
illins indicio silvis inventa sub altis 

dicitur inceptain destituisse fugam. 20 
nunc quoque per pueros iaculis incessitur index 

et pretium auctori vulneris ipsa datur. 
Qua ventura dea est, iuvenes timidaeque puellae 

praeverrunt latas veste iacente vias. 
virginei crines auro gemmaque premuntur, 25 

et tegit auratos palla superba pedes : 
more patrum Graio velatae vestibus albis 

tradita supposito vertice sacra ferunt. 
ore favent populi tunc cum venit aurea pompa, 

ipsa sacerdotes subsequiturque suas. 30 
Argiva est pompae facies ; Agamemnone caeso 

et scelus et patrias fugit Halaesus opes 
iamque pererratis profugus terraque fretoque 

moenia felici condidit alta manu. 
ille suos docuit Iunonia sacra Faliscos. 35 

sint mikij sint populo semper arnica suo ! 

XIV 

Non ego^ ne pecces, cum sis formosa^ recuso, 

sed ne sit misero scire necesse mihi ; 
nec te nostra iubet fieri censura pudicanij 

sed tamen, ut temptes dissimulare^ rogat. 



498 



THE AMORES III. xiv 



and the leader of the flock, with hard temples over- 
hung by the curving horn. The .she-goat only is hate- 
ful to the mistress-deity ; through her tale-telling, 
they say, the goddess was found in the deep forest 
and made to cease the flight she had entered on." 
Now, even children assail the tattler with their darts, 
and she herself is prize to whoever deals the wound. 

23 Wherever the goddess will pass, youths and 
timid maidens go before, sweeping the broad ways 
with trailing robe. The maidens' locks are pressed 
by gold and gems, and the proud palla covers feet 
that are bright with gold ; in the manner of their 
Grecian sires of yore, veiled in white vestments they 
bear on their heads the sacred offerings of old. The 
crowd keep reverent silence as the golden pomp 
comes on, with the goddess' self close in the wake 
of her ministers. 

31 From Argos is the form of the pomp ; when 
Agamemnon fell, Halaesus left behind both the crime 
and the riches of his fatherland, and after wandering 
an exile over land and sea founded with auspicious 
hand these lofty walls. 'Twas he who taught his 
Faliscans the holy rites of Juno. Ever friendly to 
me, and ever to their folk, may those rites be. 



XIV 

That you should not err, since vou are fair, is not 
my plea, but that I be not compelled, poor wretch, 
to know it ; no censor am I who demands that you 
become chaste, but one who asks that you attempt 

" A story not otherwise known. 



499 



OVID 



lion peewit, quaecumque potest peccasse negare, 5 

solaque famosam culpa professa faeit. 
quis furor est, quae nocte latent, in luce fateri, 

et quae clam facias facta referre palam ? 
ignoto meretrix corpus iunctura Quiriti 

opposita populum summovet ante sera ; 10 
tu tua prostitues famae peccata sinistrac 

commissi perages indiciumque tui ? 
sit tiln mens melior, saltemve imitare pudicas, 

teque probam, quamvis non eris, esse putem. 
quae facis, haec facito ; tantum fecisse negato, 15 

nec pudcat coram verba modesta loqui ! 
Est qui nequitiam locus exigat ; omnibus ilium 

deliciis inple, stet procul inde pudor ! 
hinc simul exieris, lascivia protinus omnis 

absit, et in lecto crimina pone tuo. '20 
illic nec tunicam tibi sit posuisse pudori 

nec femori inpositum sustinuisse femur ; 
illic purpurcis condatur lingua labellis, 

inque modos Venerem mille figuret amor ; 
illic nec voces nec verba iuvantia cessent, 25 

spondaque lasciva mobilitate tremat ! 
indue cum tunicis metuentem crimina vultum, 

et pudor obscenum diffiteatur opus ; 
da populo, da verba mihi ; sine nescius errem, 

et liceat stulta credulitate frui ! 30 
Cur totiens video mitti recipique tabellas ? 

cur pressus prior est interiorque torus ? 
cur plus quam sonino turbatos esse capillos 

collaque conspicio dentis habere notam ? 
tantum non oculos crimen deducis ad ipsos ; 35 

si dubitas famae parcere, parce mihi ! 
mens abit et morior quotiens peccasse fateris, 

perque meos artus frigida gutta fluit. 

500 



THE AMORES III. xiv 



to feign. She does not sin who c;m deny her sin, 
and 'tis only the fault avowed that brings dishonour. 
What madness is this, to confess in the light of day 
the hidden things of night, and spread abroad your 
seeret deeds ? Even the jade that receives some 
unknown son of Quirinus is careful first to slip the 
bolt and exclude the crowd ; and you — will you 
expose your faults to the mercy of evil tongues 
and be the informer to tell of your own misdeeds ? 
Put on a better mind, and imitate, at least, the 
modest of } r our sex, and let me think you honest 
though you are not. What you are doing, continue 
to do ; only deny that you have done, nor be ashamed 
to use modest speech in public. 

17 There is a spot that calls for wantonness ; fill 
that with all delights, and let blushing be far away. 
Once you are forth from there, straight lay all lewd- 
ness aside, and leave your faults in the couch . . . . 
Put on with your dress a face that shrinks from 
guilt, and let a modest aspeet deny the harlot's trade. 
Cheat the people, cheat me ; allow me to mistake 
through ignorance, to enjoy a fool's belief in you ! 

31 Why must I see so often the sending and 
getting of notes ? Why that your couch has been 
pressed in every place? Why do I gaze on hair 
disordered by more than sleep, and see the mark 
of a tooth upon your neck ? Yon all but bring 
your sin before my very eyes ; if you hesitate to 
spare your name, at least spare me ! My mind fails 
me and I suffer death each time you confess your 
sin, and through my frame the blood runs cold. 

S 01 



OVID 



tunc amOj tunc odi frustra quod amare necesse est ; 

tunc ego, sed tecum, mortuus esse veliru ! 40 
Nil equidem inquiram, nee quae celare parabis 

insequar, et falli muneris instar erit. 
si tamen in media deprensa tenebere culpa, 

et fuerint oculis probra videnda meis, 
quae bene visa mihi fuerint, bene visa negato — 45 

concedent verbis lumina nostra tuis. 
prona tibi vinci cupientem vincere palma est, 

sit modo " non feci ! " dicere lingua memor. 
cum tibi contingat verbis superare duobus, 

etsi non causa, iudice vince tuo ! 50 

XV 

Quaere novum vatem, tenerorum mater Amorum ! 

raditur hie elegis ultima meta meis ; 
quos ego conposui, Paeligni ruris alumnus — 

nee me deliciae dedecuere meae — 
siquid id est, usque a proavis vetus ordinis heres, 5 

non modo militiae turbine factus eques. 
Mantua Vergilio, gaudet Verona Catullo ; 

Paelignae dicar gloria gentis ego, 
quam sua libertas ad honesta coegerat arma, 

cum timuit socias anxia Roma manus. 10 

502 



THE AMORES III. xv 



Then do I love you, tlien try in vain to hate what 
I love perforce ; then would I gladly be dead — but 
dead with you ! 

41 I will make no inquiry, be assured, and will 
not follow out what you will make ready to hide ; 
to be deceived shall be as a duty. If none the less 
I shall find you out in the midst of a fault, and my 
eyes perforce shall have looked upon your shame, 
see } T ou deny that I clearly saw what was clearly 
seen — my eyes will yield to your words. 'Twill 
be an easy palm for you — to be victor over one who 
is eager to be vanquished ; all that you need is a 
tongue that remembers "1 did not do it ! " When 
you may win the day by a mere two words, if you 
cannot through your cause, be victor through your 
judge ! 

XV 

Seek a new bard, mother of tender Loves ! I am 
come to the last turning-post my elegies will graze ; 
the elegies whose poet am I — nor have these my 
delights dishonoured me — child reared on Paelignian 
acres, and heir, if that be aught, of a line of grand- 
sires far removed, no knight created but now amid 
the whirlwind of war. 

7 Mantua joys in Virgil, Verona in Catullus ; 'tis I 
shall be called the glory of the Paelignians, race 
whom their love of freedom compelled to honour- 
able arrns when anxious Rome was in fear of the 
allied bands ; a and some stranger, looking on 

a The Social War, 90-89 B.C., by which Rome was com- 
pelled to grant citizenship to the Italians. The Pacligni 
were leaders. 

5°3 



OVID 



atque aliquis spectans hospes Sulmonis aquosi 

moenia, quae campi iugera pauca tenent, 
" Quae tan turn " dicat " potuistis ferre poetam 

quantulacumque estis, vos ego magna voco.' 
Culte puer puerique parens Amathusia culti^ 

aurea de campo vellite signa meo ! 
corniger increpuit thyrso graviore Lyaeus : 

pulsanda est magnis area maior equis. 
inbelles elegit genialis»Musa, valete, 

post mea mansnrum fata superstes opus ! 



504 



THE AMORES III. xv 



watery Sulmo's walls, that guard the scant acres 
of her plain, may say : " O thou who couldst beget 
so great a poet, however small thou art, I name 
thee mighty ! " 

15 O worshipful child, and thou of Amathus, 
mother of the worshipful child, pluck ye up from 
my field your golden standards ! The horned Lyaean 
hath dealt me a sounding blow with weightier 
thyrsus ; I must smite the earth with mighty steeds 
on a mightier course. Unwarlike elegies, congenial 
Muse, O fare ye well, work to live on when I am 
no more ! 



5 °S 



OVID 



VII 

• 

At non formosa est., at non bene culta puella, 

at, puto, non votis saepe petita meis ! 
hanc tamen in nullos tenui male languidus usus, 

sed iacui pigro crimen onusque toro ; 
nec potui cupiens, pariter cupiente puella, 5 

inguinis effeti parte iuvante frui. 
ilia quidem nostro subiecit eburnea collo 

bracchia Sithonia candidiora nive, 
osculaque inseruit cupide luctantia linguis 

lascivum femori supposuitque femur, 10 
et mihi blanditias dixit dominumque voeavit, 

et quae praeterea publica verba iuvant. 
tacta tamen veluti gelida mea membra cicuta 

segnia propositum destituere meum ; 
truncus iners iacui, species et inutile pondus, 15 

et non exactum, corpus an umbra forem. 
Quae mihi ventura est, siquidem ventura, senectus, 

cum desit numeris ipsa iuventa suis ? 
a, pudet annorum cum 1 me iuvenemque virumque 

nec iuvenem nec me sensit arnica virum ! 20 
sic flammas aditura pias aeterna sacerdos 

surgit et a caro fratre verenda soror. 
at nuper bis flava Chlide, ter Candida Pitho, 

ter Libas officio continuata meo est ; 
exigere a nobis angusta nocte Corinnam 25 

me memini numeros sustinuisse novem. 
Num mea Thessalico languent devota veneno 

corpora ? num misero carmen et herba nocent, 

1 cum (quom) Pa.: quo P Br.: quod vulg.: cur Merk.: 
quare Nlm. 

506 



THE AMORES III. vii 



sagave poenicea 1 deftxit nomina cera 

et medium tenuis in iecur egit acus ? 30 
carmine laesa Ceres sterilem vanescit in herbam, 

deficiunt laesi carmine fontis aquae, 
ilicibus glandes cantataque vitibus uva 

decidit, et nullo poma movente fluunt. 
quid vetat et nervos magicas torpere per artes ? 35 

forsitan inpatiens sit latus inde meiim. 
hue pudor accessit facti ; pudor ipse nocebat ; 

ille fuit vitii causa secunda mei. 
At qualem vidi tantum tetigique puellam ! 

sic etiam tunica tangitur ilia sua. 40 
illius ad tactum Pylius iuvenescere possit 

Tithonosque annis fortior esse suis. 
haec mihi contigerat ; sed vir non contigit illi. 

quas nunc concipiam per nova vota preces ? 
credo etiam magnos, quo sum tarn turpiter usus, 45 

muneris oblati paenituisse deos. 
optabam certe recipi — sum nempe reeeptus ; 

oscula ferre — tuli ; proximus esse — fui. 
quo mihi fortunae tantum ? quo regna sine usu? 

quid, nisi possedi dives avarus opes ? 50 
sic aret mediis taciti vulgator in undis 

pomaque, quae nullo tempore tangat, habet. 
a tenera quisquam sic surgit mane puella, 

protinus ut sanctos possit adire deos ? 
Sed, puto, non blande, non optima perdidit in 

me 55 

oscula ; non omni sollicitavit ope ! 
ilia graves potuit quercus adamantaque durum 

surdaque blanditiis saxa movere suis. 
digna movere fuit certe vivosque virosque ; 

sed neque turn vixi nec vir, ut ante, fui. 60 
1 poenicea mdg.; sanguinea P s. 

5°7 



OVID 



quid iuvet, ad surdas si cantet Phemius aures ? 

quid raiserum Thamyran picta tabella iuvat ? 
At quae non tacita formavi gaudia mente ! 

quos ego non finxi disposuique modos ! 
nostra tamen iacuere velut praemortua membra 65 

turpiter hesterna languidiora rosa — 
quae nunc, ecce, vigent intempestiva valentque, 

nunc opus exposcunt militiamque suam. 
quin istic pudibunda iaces, pars pessima nostri ? 

sic sum pollicitis captus et ante tuis. 70 
tu dominum fallis ; per te deprensus inermis 

tristia cum magno damna pudore tuli. 
Hanc etiam non est mea dedignata puella 

molliter admota sollicitare manu ; 
sed postquam nullas consurgere posse per artes 75 

inmemoremque sui procubuisse videt, 
"quid me ludis ? " ait, "quis te, male sane, iubebat 

invitum nostro ponere membra toro ? 
aut te traiectis Aeaea venefica lanis 

devovet, aut alio lassus amore venis." 80 
nec mora, desiluit tunica velata soluta — 

et decuit nudos proripuisse pedes ! — 
neve suae possent intactam scire ministrae, 

dedecus hoc sumpta dissimulavit aqua. 



S o8 



INDEX 



I. HEROIDES 



Abydestus: XYin. 1 ; xix. 100 
Abydos, a town on the Hellespont, 

opposite Sestus: xvm. 12, 127; 

xix. 29, 30 
Acastus, a Greek prince : xin. 25 
Aehaeiades, women of Greece: in. 

71 

Achaia : xvi. 187; xvn. 209 

Achaius : viil. 13 

Acheloius : xvi. 207 

Achclous, a river-god: IX. 139 

Achilles, son of Pel?us and Thetis, 
and lover of Briseis : in. 2f>, 41, 
137; VIII. 45, 87; XX. 69 

Aclullides, Pyrrhus, son of Achilles : 
VIII, 3 

Achivi, a name of the Greeks : l. 21 
Acontius, a youth of Ceos, in love 

with Cydippc of Athens : xx. 239 ; 

XXI. 103, 209, 229 
Actaeon, transformed to a stag by 

Diana, and torn by his own 

hounds : xx. 103 
Actaeus, of Acte, an old name for 

Attica : II. 6 ; xvm. 42 
Actiacus : XV. 166, 185 
Aeacides, Aeacus' son, Achilles : 

I. 35; ni. 87 ; Vin. 7, 33, 55 
Aeetes, Aeeta, father of Medea, 

king of Colchis : VI. 50 ; xn. 

29, 51; XVII. 123 
Aeetine, daughter of Aeetes, 

Medea : vi. 103 
Aegacus : xvi. 118; xxi. 66 
Aegeus, husband of Aethra and 

father of Theseus : x. 131 
Aegidcs, descendants of Aegeus, 

king of Athens, among whom 

was Theseus: II. 67; iv. 59; 

xvi. 327 

Aegiua, bride of Jove, mother of 
Aeacua, father of Peleus : in. 73 

OVID. 



Aegisthus, son of Thyestes, seducer 
of Clytemnestra, murderer of 
Agamemnon : vm. 53 

Aeneas, a Trojan hero, lover of 
Dido, and founder of the Latin 
power: vn. 9, 25, 26, 29, 195 

Aeolis : xi. 5, 34 

Aeolius : xv. 200 

Aeolus, god of the winds : x. 06; 

XI. 65, 95 
Aesonides, Jason, son of Aeson : 

VI. 25, 103, 109; XII. 16. 
Aesonius : XII. 134; xvn. 230 
Aethra, companion of Helen : xvi. 

259; xvn. 150, 267 
Aethra, wife of Aegeus and mother 

of Theseus : x. 131 
Aetna : xv. 11 
Aetnaeus : xv. 12 
Aetolis : ix. 131 
Afer : vn. 169 
Agamemnon : III. 83 
Agamemnonius : ill. 38 
Agrios, brother of Oeneus : ix. 153 
Alcaeus, the poet-friend of Sappho : 

XV. 29 

Alcides, Hercules, grandson of 

Aleeus : IX. 75, 133; XVI. 207 
Alciinedc, Jason's mother : vi. 105 
Alcyone, transformed to a king- 
fisher : xvm. 81 ; xix. 133 
Allecto, one of the Furies : II. 119 
Amazonius : IV. 2; xxi. 119 
Ambracia, a town in Epirus : xv. 
164 

Amor : IV. 11, 148: VII. 32, 59; 

xv. 179; xvi. 16, 203; xvm. 

190; XX. 28, 30, 46, 230 
Amphitryon, husband of Alcincne, 

mother of Hercules: IX. 44 
Amymone, daughter of Danaus, 

loved by Poseidon : Xix. 131 

509 



INDEX 



Amyntor, father of Phoenix, Hi. 27 
Anactorie, a friend of Sappho : xv. 
17 

Ancliises, father of Aeneas : vii. 
162; XVI. 203 

Audrogeus, brother of Ariadne and 
son of Minos of Crete, who im- 
posed on Athens the tribute of 
seven youths and seven maidens 
because of his son's death there : 
X. 99 

Andromache : v. 107; vm. 13 
Andromede, Andromeda, daughter 

of Cepheus, rescued by Perseus : 

xv. 36; xvni. 151 
Andros, an island in the Aegean : 

xxi. 81 
Anna : vii. 191 

Antaeus, King of Libya, the famous 
wrestler throttled by Hercules : 
ix. 71 

Antenor, a Trojan warrior, coun- 
sellor of Priam : v. 95 

Antilochus, son of Nestor. 3lain 
by Meinnon • I. 15 

Antinous, suitor of Penelope : I. 92 

Aonius, of the Aonian mountains, 
in Boeotia : ix. 133 

Apollo : vm. 83; XV. 23 

Aquilo, the north-wind: XI. 13; 
XVI. 345 

Arabs : xv. 76 

Arctophylax, Bootes : xvm. 188 
Arctos, the Lesser Bear : xvm, 149 
Argo, the ship of the Argonauts : 

VI. 65; XII. 9 
Argolicus: I. 25; VI. 80; vm. 74; 

xm. 71 
Argolides : vi. 31 
Argos : xiv. 34 

Ariadne, daughter of Minos, king 
of Crete. Having aided Theseus 
of Athens to find his way in the . 
Labyrinth and thus slay her own 
brother the Minotaur, she flies 
with him, but is abandoned by 
him on the isle of Kaxos, v. hence 
her letter is written : x., title 

Ascanius, son of Aeneas : vii. 77 

Asia : xvi. 177. 355 

Atalanta, daughter of Iasius of 
Arcadia, loved by Meleager : rv. 99 

Athamas, son of Aeolus and father 
of Phrixus and Helle : xvm. 137 

5 10 



Athenae : II. 83 

Atlans, Atlas, who supported the 

world : IX. 18; xvi. 62 
Atracis, of Atrax. a town • in 

Thessaly : xvn. 248 
Atreus, father of Agamemnon and 

Menelaus : vm. 27 
Atrides, Atreus' son, Agamemnon 

or Menelaus : ill. 39, 148 ; v. 

101; xvi. 357, 366 
Atthis, a friend of Sappho • xv. 18 
Auge, a princess of Arcadia, loved 

by Hercules : ix. 49 
Aulis, the port from which the 

Greeks sailed for Troy : xm. 3 
Aurora, the dawn-goddess : iv. 95 ; 

XV. 87; XVI. 201; XVIII. 112 

Baccha : x. 48 

Bacchus : IV. 47 ; v. 115 ; xv. 24, 25 
Beiides, descendant of Belus, father 

of Danaus and Aegyptus : xiv. 73 
Bicorniger, Bacchus : xm. 33 
Bistonis, Tliracian : xvi. 346 
Bistonius, Tliracian, from the Bis- 

tones : II. 90 
Boreas: xm. 15; xvm. 39, 209; 

XXI. 42 

Briseis, the Mysian captive loved 
by Achilles, from whom she was 
taken by Agamemnon to replace 
Chryseis, his own love, an act 
which caused the Wrath of 
Achilles. She writes to reproach 
her lover for not claiming her : 
m. 1, 137; xx. 69 

Busiris, tyrant of Egypt, who 
sacrificed strangers to his god : 
IX. 69 

Calyce, mother of Cycnus : xix 133 

Calydon, home of the famous boar, 
in Aetolia : xx. 101 

Canace, daughter of Aeolus, guilty 
with her brother Macareus, whose 
deep love -he returns. Discovered 
by her father, and bidden to take 
her own life, she writes Macareus 
of her fate. The subject is un- 
pleasant, but the letter one of 
the best: xi., title 

Carthage : <ti. 11, 19 

Cassandra, sister of Paris, a 
prophetess : xvi. 121 



INDEX— HEROIDES 



Cea, an island in the Aegean : XX. 
222 

Oeeropis, Athenian : x. 100 
Oecropins, of Ceerops, Athenian : 
X. 125 

Ceiaeno, a Pleiad : XIX. 135 

Centaurus : XVII. 247 

Cephalus, a hunter loved by 

Aurora : IV. 93; XV. S7 
Cephcius : xv. 35 
Cerberus, a monster of the lower 

world : IX. 94 
Cerealis, sacred to Ceres : iv. 67 
Ceyx, husband of Alcyone and son 

of Lucifer : xvm. 81 
Chalciope : xvn. 232 
Charaxus : XV. 117 
Cinyras, loved by Venus, and father 

of Adonis : iv. 97 
Clymene, companion of Helen : 

XVI. 259; xvn. 267 
Colchi, Medea's home : XII. 23, 

159; XVIII. 157; xix. 175 
Colchus : VI. 131, 130; XII. 1, 9, 

159; xvi. 348 
Corona, a constellation, the Crown : 

xvm, 151 
Corycius, of the Corycian cave on 

Mt. Parnassus : xx. 221 
Creon, king of Corinth : xn. 54 
Cres : xvi. 350 
Cresins : xvi. 301 

Cressa, the Cretan maid Ariadne 
abandoned by Theseus on the 
isle of Naxos : II. 76; IV. 2 

Cretaeus : x. 106 

Crete : x. 67; xvn. 163 

Creusa, daughter of Creon, king 
of Corinth, Jason's wife after 
Medea : XII. 54 

Cupido : xv. 215; xvi. 115 

Cydippe, a maiden of Athens, loved 
byAcontius: xx. 107, 172, 202; 
XXI. 123 

Cydro, a friend of Sappho : xv. 17 
Cynthia, the moon-goddess : xvm. 
74 

Cythcrea : xvi. 20, 138; xvn. 241 
Cytheriacus, of Cythera, the isle 

near which Venus rose from the 

sea : vn. 00 

Daedalus, father of Icarus : xvm. 
49 



Danaus, Danaan or Greek : I. 3; 

III. 86, 1 13, 127; V. 93, 157; 
VIII. 14, 24; XIII. 02, 91. 131 

Danaus, driven with hi* fifty 
d lughters from Africa to Argo; 
by Iih bio!h°r Aegyptus with his 
fifty sons, who wished to slay 
them in order to possess fh whnl" 
kingdom. Overtaken in Argis, 
DLin;ius instructed his daughters 
to many their cousins and slay 
them all : xiv. 15, 79 

Daphne, loved by Apollo : XV. 25 

Dardania, Troy : xvi. 57 

Dardanides, descendant of Dar- 
danus, Trojan: XIII. 79; XVII. 
212 

Dardanius : VIII. 42; xvi. 196, 333 
Dardanus, Trojan: vn. 158; XIII. 
140 

Daulias, Daulian, of Daulis in 
Phocis, the home of Tercus : xv . 
154 

Deianira, daughter of Oeneus and 
Althaea, sister of Meleager, and 
wife of Hercules. Having re- 
ceived news of Oechalii's f ill 
and Hercules' passion for lolc, 
princess of the place, she writes 
a letter of indignation and re- 
proach. As she writes, the mes- 
sage reaches her that Hercules is 
in hi s death agony on Mount 
Oet i, poisoned by the cloak of the 
Centaur .Nes^us, which -die ignor- 
antly sent him supposing it a 
charm (o bring back his love : ix. 
131, 140, 152, 158, 104; XVI. 208 

Deiphobus, brother of Hector, who 
,, married Helen after Paris' death : 
V. 94; XVI. 302 

Delia, the Delian goddess, Diana : 

IV. 40; XX. 95 

Delos : xx. 236 ; xxi. 66, 77, 82, 
102 

Delphi : XXI. 232 

Demophoon, son of Theseus of 
Athens and lover of Phyllis, 
queen of Thrace : n. 1, 25, 98, 
107, 147 

Deucalion, the Greek Noah : xv. 
107, 170 

Diana : IV. 87; xn. 09, 79; xx. 5, 
173, 211, 217; XXI. 7, 03, 105, 149 

CI r 



INDEX 



Dido, queen of Carthage, en- 
nmoured of Aeneas, who touches 
at her city after the fall of Troy, 
but is soon bidden by the gods to 
continue on his way. Learning 
of his intended departure, she 
writes him a letter of mingled 
repro.ich, entreaty, and despair : 
VII. 7, 17, 68, 133, 168, 196 

Diomedes, king of the Bistones of 
Thrace, owner of man-eating 
horses : IX. 67 

Dodonis : VI. 47 

Dolon, a Trojan spy slain by Ulysses 
and Diomedes on the night of 
their expedition to the camp of 
Khesus : I. 39 

Doricus : xvi. 372 

Dryades, mythical beings of the 
wood : iv. 49 

Dulichius, of Dulichium, an island 
near Ithaea : i. 87 

Dysparis, Paris : xin. 43 



Eleleides, followers of Eleleus, or 
Bacchus, from their cry eleleu : 
IV. 47 

Eleus, of Elis in Olympia : XVIII. 
166 

Eleusin : IV. 67 

Elissa, Dido : vn. 102, 193 

Endymion, the shepherd loved by 

Diana : xvm. 63 
Enyo, identified with Bellona. 

goddess of war : xv. 139 
Eos, the dawn : in. 57 
Ephyre, old name of Corinth : xn. 

27 

Erechthis, Orithyia, daughter of 
Erechtheus, king of Atheifs : 
xvi. 345 

Erinys, one of the Furies : vi. 45; 
xi. 103 

Eryeina, epithet of Venus, from 

her mount Eryx in Sicily : xv. 57 
Erymanthus. a mountain of 

Arcadia : IX. 87 
Euenus, a river of Aetolia : IX. 141 
Europe, or Europa, carried off by 

Jove in form of a bull : iv. 55 
Eurns : VII. 42; XI. 9, 14; XV. 9 
Eurybates, herald of Agamemnon : 

III. 9 

512 



Eurymaehus, suitor of Penelope : 

I. 92 

Eurystheus, king of Mycenae, who 
imposed the twelve labors on 
Hereules : IX. 7, 45 

Eurytis, Iole, daughter of Eurytus, 
king of Oechalia : ix. 133 

Faunus : rv. 49 

Gaetulus, of a certain North African 
tribe : vn. 125 

Gargara, part of Ida : xvi. 109 

Geryones, three-bodied monster, 
owner of cattle stolen by Her- 
cules : ix. 92 

Gnosis, Ariadne of Gnosus, or 
Cnossus, in Crete : xv. 26. 

Gnosius. Cretan : iv. 68 

Gorge, sister of Deianira : IX. 165 

Graeeia : in. 84; xvi. 342 

Graecus : 111. 2 

Graiusrv. 117, 118;vin. 112; 
XII. 10, 30, 203; xvi. 33 

Haemonis : xni. 2 

Haemonius, Thracian : vi. 23 ; XII, 

127; xin. 2; xvii. 248 
Haemus, a mountain of Thrace : 

II. 113 

Hebrus, a river of Thrace : 11. 15, 
114 

Heeataeon, father of Calyce : xix. 
133 

Hecate, deity of enchantment : 
xii. 168 

Heetor: 1. 36; in. 86; v. 93; xm. 

65, 68; XVI. 367; xvii. 255 
Hectoreus : I. 14; ill. 126 
Hecuba, Priam's queen : v. 84 
Helene, of Troy : v. 75 ; VIII. 99 ; 

XVI. 2S1, 287; XVII. 134 
Helice, the Great Bear : xvm. 149 
Helle, see I'hrixus : xvm. 141 ; xix, 

123, 128 

Hellespontiacus : xvm. 108; xix. 
32 

Hercules, son of Jove and Alcmena : 
IX. 18, 27, 129, 149 

Hereuleus : IX. 57, 64 

Hennione, daughter of Menelaus 
and Helen, given in marriaga 
against her will by Agamemnon 
to Achilles" son Pyrrhus, in fulfil- 



INDEX— HEROIDES 



ment ol a promise made at Troy. 
Her letter is a pathetic appeal to 
her lover Orestes, Agamemnon's 
son and her own cousin, to whom 
she hud previously been promised 
by her grandfather Tyndareus, 
to assert his right : vm. 59; xvi. 
25G 

Hero, a maid of Sestus. In Mus- 
aeus, a late- Greek poet, she i3 
priestess of Aphrodite: xviii., 
xix., titles 

Hesione, daughter of Laomedon, 
loved by Telamon, and mother of 
Teucer : xx. 69 

Hiberus, Spanish : ix. 91 

Hippodamia, bride of Pelops : 
vm. 70; xvi. 266; bride of 
Pirithous : xvn. 248 

Hippolytc : xxi. 120 

Hippolytus, son of Theseus and 
Hippolyte : IV. 36, 164; xxi. 10 

Hippomenes, lover of Atalanta, 
who won the race with her, and 
herself, t>y dropping golden apples 
to delay her: xvi. 265; xxi. 124 

Hippotades, Aeolus, son of Hippotes , 
king of the winds : xvm. 46 

Hyllus : IX. 44, 168 

Hymen: VI. 44, 45; IX. 134; XII. 
137, 143; xrv. 27 

Hymenaeus : n. 33; xi. 101; xn. 
143; xiv. 27; xxi. 157 

Hypermestra, one of the fifty 
daughters of Danaus bidden by 
their father to slay in one night 
their husbands, the fifty sons of 
Danaus" brother Aegyptus. She 
was tho only one to disobey, and 
writes from the prison into which 
herfath n rhas cast her to Lynceus, 
the husband she spared and 
helped escape : xiv. 1, 53, 129 

Hypsipyle, queen of Lemnos, with 
whom Jason, on the Argonautic 
expedition, remained two years 
as lover and promised husband. 
She writes after hearing of his 
flight with Medea and the Golden 
Fleece: VI. 8, 59, 132, 152; xvn. 
193 

Iarbas, a Gactulian prince who 
courted Dido : vn. 125 

OVID 



Iardania, Omphale, daughter of 
Iardanus, a queen of Lydia loved 
by Hercules : IX. 103 

Iason, leader of the expedition for 
the Golden Fleece : vi. 37, 77, 
119, 139; XII. 151; XIX. 175 

Icarius, father of Penelope : I. 81 

Ida, Ide: v. 73, 138; XIII. 53; xvi. 
53, 110; xvn. 115 

Idaeus : rv. 48; vm. 73; XVI. 204, 
303; XIX. 177 

Idyia, mother of Medea : xvti. 232 

Uiacus : xm. 38; xvil. 215, 221; 
xxi. 118 

llias, a woman of Uion : xvi. 333 

llioneus, a Trojan : xvi. 362 

llios, Ilion, a name of Troy : 1. 43; 
vii. 151 ; xm. 53 

Iole, princess of Oechalia, loved by 
Hercules : ix. 6, 133 

Ioniacus, Ionian : ix. 73 

Iphiclus, father of Protesilaus of 
Phylace, in Thessaly : xni. 25 

Inachis, of Inachus, Argive : Xiv, 
23, 105 

Inachius : XIII. 134 

Io, transformed into a heifer, 
guarded by Argus, delivered by 
Hermes, tormented by Juno'a 
gadfly, and changed back to 
human form in Egypt, where she 
became Isis : referred to in xrv. 84 

Irus, the beggar in Ulysses' palace : 
I. 95 

Ismarius, of Ismarus, In Thrace, 
Thracian : I. 46; XV. 154 

Isthmos, of Corinth : vm. 69 ; xn. 
104 

Italus, Italian, of King Italus : vn. 
• 9 

Itys. son of Tereus and Procne : 

xv. 154, 155 

lulus, son of Aeneas, called also 
Ascanius: vu. 75, 83, 137, 153 

Iuno : II. 41; IV. 35; v. 35; VI. 
43, 45; ix. 5, 11, 26, 45; xn. 87; 

xvi. 65; xvn. 133. 
Iunonius : xiv. 84 

Iuppiter: m. 73; IV. 36, 55, 163; 
VI. 152; VTII. 48, 68, 78; IX. 22; 
X. 68; XI. 18; xm. 50, 144; 
xiv. 28, 88 95, 99; xvi. 72.81, 
166, 175, 214, 252, 274, 292, 294; 
xvn. 50, 53, 55; xvin, 153 

513 

i.r. 



THE AMORES I. vii 



my right o'er my lady-love be greater ? The son of 
Tydeus left most vile example of offence. He was 
the first to smite a goddess" — I am the second ! And 
he was less guilty than I. I injured her I professed 
to love ; Tydeus' son was cruel with a foe. 

35 Go now. victor, make ready mighty triumphs, 
circle your hair with laurel and pay your vows to 
Jove, and let the thronging retinue that follow 
your car cry out : " Ho ! our valiant hero has been 
victorious over a girl!" Let her walk before, a 
downcast captive with hair let loose — from head to 
foot pure white, did her wounded cheeks allow ! 
More fit had it been for her to be marked with the 
pressure of my lips, and to bear on her neck the 
print of caressing tooth. Finally, if I must needs 
be swept along like a swollen torrent, and blind 
anger must needs make me its prey, were it not 
enough to have cried out at the frightened girl, 
without the too hard threats I thundered ? or to 
have shamed her by tearing apart her gown from 
top to middle? — her girdle would have come to the 
rescue there. 

40 But, as it was, I could endure to rend cruelly 
the hair from her brow and mark with my nail 
her free-born cheeks. She stood there bereft of 
sense, with face bloodless and white as blocks of 
marble hewn from Parian cliffs. I saw her limbs all 
nerveless and her frame a-tremb!e — like the leaves 
of the poplar shaken by the breeze, like the slender 
reed set quivering by gentle Zephyr, or the surface 
of the wave when ruffled by the warm South-wind ; 
and the tears, long hanging in her eyes, came 
flowing o'er her cheeks even as water distils from 
snow that is cast aside. 'Twas then that first I 



345 



OVID 



tunc ego me primum coepi sentire nocentem — 

sanguis erant lacrimae, quas dabat ilia, meus. 60 
ter tamen ante pedes volui procumbere supplex ; 

ter fonnidatas reppulit 1 ilia manus. 
At tu ne dubita — minuet vindicta dolorem — 

protinus in vultus unguibus ire meos. 
nec nostris oculis nec nostris parce capillis : G5 

quamlibet infirmas adiuvat ira manus ; 
neve mei sceleris tarn tristia signa supersint, 

pone recompositas in statione comas ! 

VIII 

Est quaedam — quicumque volet cognoscere lenam, 

audiat ! — est quaedam nomine Dipsas anus, 
ex re nomen habet — nigri non ilia parentem 

Memnonis in roseis sobria vidit equis. 
ilia magas artes Aeaeaque carmina novit 5 

inque caput liquidas arte recurvat aquas ; 
scit bene, quid gramen, quid torto concita rhombo 

licia, quid valeat virus amantis equae. 
cum voluit, toto glomerantur nubila caelo ; 

cum voluit, puro fulget in orbe dies. 10 
sanguine, siqua fides, stillantia 2 sidera vidi ; 

purpureus Lunae sanguine vultus erat. 
banc ego nocturnas versam volitare per umbras 

suspicor et pluma corpus anile tegi. 

3 retulit P ■. reppulit usual reading : rettudit Ehw. Br. 
2 stillantia usual reading : stellantia P Nem. 

" Meaning " thirsty." 6 Aurora, the dawn. 

346 



THE AM ORES I. viii 



began to feel my guilt — my blood it was that flowed 
when she shed those tears. Thrice, none the less, I 
would have cast myself before her feet a suppliant ; 
though thrice thrust she back my dreadful hands. 

63 But you, stay not — for your vengeance will 
lessen my grief — from straight assailing my features 
with your nails. Spare neither my eyes nor yet 
my hair : however weak the hand, ire gives it 
strength ; or at least, that the sad signs of my 
misdeed may not survive, once more range in due 
rank your ordered locks. 



VIII 

Thehe is a certain — whoso wishes to know of a 
bawd, let him hear ! — a certain old dame there is by 
the name of Dipsas. Her name a accords with fact — 
she has never looked with sober eye upon black 
Memnon's mother, her of the rosy steeds. 6 She 
knows the ways of magic, and Aeaean incantations, 
and by her art turns back the liquid waters upon 
their source ; she knows well what the herb can 
do, what the thread set in motion by the whirl- 
ing magic wheel, what the poison of the mare in 
heat. Whenever she has willed, the clouds are 
rolled together overall the sky; whenever she has 
willed, the day shines forth in a clear heaven. I 
have seen, if you can believe me, the stars letting 
drop down blood ; crimson with blood was the face 
of Luna. I suspect she changes form and flits about 
in the shadows of night, her aged body covered 
with plumage. I suspect, and rumour bears me out. 



347 



OVID 



suspieor, et fama est. oeulis quoque pupula duplex 1 

fulminat, et gemino lumen ab orbe venit. 1 
evocat antiquis proavos atavosque sepuleris 

et solidam longo carmine findit humum. 
Haec sibi proposuit thalamos temerare pudicos ; 

nee tamen eloquio lingua nocente caret. 2 
fors me sermoni testem dedit ; ilia monebat 

talia — me duplices occuluere fores : 
" scis here te, raea lux, iuveni placuisse beato ? 

haesit et in vultu constitit usque tuo. 
et cur non placeas ? nulli tua forma secunda est ; 2 

me miseram, dignus corpore cultus abest ! 
tarn felix esses quam formosissima, vellem — 

non ego, te facta divite, pauper ero. 
Stella tibi oppositi nocuit contraria Martis. 

Mars abiit ; signo nunc Venus apta suo. 3 
prosit ut adveniens, en adspice ! dives amator 

te cupiit ; curae, quid tibi desit, habet. 
est etiam faeies, quae se tibi conparet, illi ; 

si te non emptam vellet, emendus erat." 
Erubuit. " decet alba quidem pudor ora, sed iste, 3 

si simules, prodest ; verus obesse solet. 
cum bene deiectis gremium spectabis ocellis, 

quantum quisque ferat, respiciendus erit. 
forsitan inmnndae Tatio regnante Sabinae 

noluerint habiles pluribns esse viris ; 4 
nunc Mars externis animos exercet in arm is, 

at Venus Aeneae regnat in urbe sui. 

1 venit P: micat P 5 Xem. Br. 

a Pliny, X.II. vii. 16, 17, IS, speaks of women with doubl 
pupils. 

343 



THE AMORES I. viii 



From her eyes, too, double pupils dart their light- 
nings, with rays that issue from twin orbs. rt She 
summons forth from ancient sepulehres the dead of 
generations far remote, and with long incantations 
lays open the solid earth. 

19 This old dame has set herself to profane a 
modest union ; her tongue is none the less with- 
out a baneful eloquence. Chance made me witness 
to what she said ; she was giving these words of 
counsel — the double doors concealed me : " Know 
you, my light, that yesterday you won the favour of 
a wealthy youth ? Caught fast, he could not keep 
his eyes from your faee. And why should you not 
win favour ? Second to none is your beauty. Ah 
me, apparel worthy of your person is your lack ! I 
could wish you as fortunate as you are most fair — 
for with you become rich, I shall not be poor. Mars 
with contrary star is what has hindered you. Mars 
is gone ; now favouring Venus' star is here. How her 
rising brings yon fortune, lo, behold! A rich lover 
has desired yon ; he has interest in your needs. 
He has a faee, too, that may match itself with 
yours ; were he unwilling to buy, he were worthy 
to be bought. 

35 My lady blushed. 

"Blushes, to be sure, become a pale face, but 
the blush one feigns is the one that profits ; real 
blushing is wont to be loss. With eyes becomingly 
cast down you will look into your lap, and regard 
each lover according to what he brings. It may be 
that in Tatins' reign the unadorned Sabine fair 
would not be had to wife by more than one ; but 
now in wars far off Mars tries the souls of men, and 
'tis Venus reigns in the city of her Aeneas. The 



349 



OVID 



ludunt formosae ; casta est, quam nemo rogavit — 

aut, si rustieitas non vetat, ipsa rogat. 
has quoque, quas frontis rugas in vertice poi'tas, 1 45 

excute ; de rugis crimina multa cadent. 
Penelope iuvenum vires temptabat in arcu ; 

qui latus ai-gueret, corneus arcus erat. 
labitur oeculte fallitque volubilis aetas, 

et celer admissis labituv annus equis. 2 50 
aera nitent usu, vestis bona quaerit haberi, 

canescunt turpi tecta relicta situ — 
forma, nisi admittas, nullo exercente senescit. 

nec satis efFectus unus et alter habent ; 
certior e multis nec iani invidiosa rapina est. 55 

plena venit eanis dc grege praeda lupis. 
Ecce, quid istc tuus praeter nova carmina vates 

donat ? amatoris milia multa leges. 3 
ipse deus vatum palla spectabilis aurea 

tractat inauratae consona fila lyrae. GO 
qui dabit, ille tibi magno sit maior Homero ; 

crede mihi, res est ingeniosa dare, 
nec tu, siquis erit capitis mercede redemptus, 

despiee ; gypsati crimen inane pedis, 
nec te decipiant veteres circum atria cerae. 65 

tolle tuos tecum, pauper amator, avos ! 
quin, quia pulcher erit, poseet sine munere noctem ! 

quod det, amatorem flagitet ante suum ! 
Parcius exigito pretium, dum retia tendis, 

ne fugiant; captos legibus ure tuis ! 70 

1 So theMSS.: quae . . . portant Burm. Ehw, Nem. Br. 

2 ut . . . amnis aquis N. Hem. Nem. 3 feres Nem. 



a The wrinkles are those of feigned austerity, the mask of 
a wanton life. 

6 Apollo. c Slaves offered for sale were thus marked. 
35° 



THE AMORES I. viii 



beautiful keep holiday ; chaste is she whom no one 
has asked — or, be she not too countrified, she 
herself asks first. Those wrinkles, too, which you 
carry high on your brow, shake off ; from the 
wrinkles many a naughtiness will fall." Penelope, 
when she used the bow, was making trial of 
the young men's powers ; of horn was the bow 
that proved their strength. The stream of a lifetime 
glides smoothly on and is past before we know, and 
swift the year glides by with horses at full speed. 
Bronze grows bright with use ; a fair garment asks 
for the wearing ; the abandoned dwelling moulders 
with age and corrupting neglect — and beauty, so 
you open not your doors, takes age from lack of use. 
Nor, do one or two lovers avail enough ; more sure 
your spoil, and less invidious, if from many. 'Tis 
from the flock a full prey comes to hoary wolves. 

57 cc Think, what does your fine poet give you 
besides fresh verses ? You will get many thousands 
of lover's lines to read. The god of poets himself 6 
attracts the gaze by his golden robe, and sweeps 
the hjirmonious chords of a lyre dressed in gold. 
Let him who will give be greater for you than great 
Homer ; believe me, giving calls for genius. And 
do not look down on him if he be one redeemed 
with the price of freedom ; the chalk-marked 
foot c is an empty reproach. Nor let yourself be 
deluded by ancient masks about the hall. Take thy 
grandfathers and go, thou lover who art poor ! Nay, 
should he ask your favours without paying because 
he is fair, let him first demand what he may give 
from a lover of his own. 

69 " Exact more cautiously the price while you 
spread the net, lest they take flight ; once taken, 



35 1 



OVID 



nec nocuit simulatus amor ; sine, credat arnari, 

et 1 cave ne gratis hie tibi constet amor ! 
saepe nega noctes. capitis modo finge dolorem, 

et modo, quae causas praebeat, I sis erit. 
mox recipe, ut nullum patiendi colligat usum, 75 

neve relentescat saepe rejmlsus amor, 
surda sit oranti tua ianua, laxa ferenti ; 

audiat exclusi verba receptus amans ; 
et, quasi laesa prior, nonnumquam irascere laeso — 

vanescit cidpa culpa repensa tua. 80 
sed numquam dederis spatiosum tempus in iram ; 

saepe simultates ira morata tacit, 
quin etiam discant oculi lacrimare coacti, 

et faciant udas ille vel ille genas ; 
nec, siquem falles, tu periurare timeto — 85 

commodat in lusus numina surda Venus, 
servus et ad partes sollers ancilla parentur, 

qui doceant, apte quid tibi possit emi ; 
et sibi pauca rogeut — multos si pauca rogabunt, 

postmodo de stipula grandis acervus erit. 90 
et soror et mater, nutrix quoque carpat amantem ; 

fit cito per multas praeda petita manus. 
cum te deficient poscendi munera causae, 

natalem libo testificare tuum ! 
Ne securus amet nullo rivale, caveto ; 95 

non bene, si tollas proelia, durat amor, 
ille viri videat toto vestigia lecto 

factaque lascivis livida colla notis. 
munera praecipue videat, quae miserit alter. 

si dederit nemo, Sacra roganda Via est. 100 

1 et P : at vidg. : sed ed. prin. 
a Where there were man)' shops. 

35 2 



THE AMORES 1. viii 



prey upon them on terms of your own. Nor is there 
harm in pretended love ; allow him to think he is 
loved, and take care lest this love bring you nothing 
in ! Often deny your favours. Feign headache now, 
and now let Isis be what affords you pretext. After 
a time, receive him, lest he grow used to suffering, 
and his love grow slack through being oft repulsed. 
Let your portal be deaf to prayers, but wide to the 
giver ; let the lover you welcome overhear the words 
of the one you have sped ; sometimes, too, when 
you have injured him, be angry, as if injured first — 
charge met by counter-charge will vanish. But 
never give to anger long range of time ; anger 
that lingers long oft causes breach. Nay, even let 
your eyes learn to drop tears at command, and the 
one or the other bedew at will your cheeks ; nor 
fear to swear falsely if deceiving anyone — Venus 
lends deaf ears to love's deceits. Have slave and 
handmaid skilled to act their parts, to point out 
the apt gift to buy for you ; and have them ask 
little gifts for themselves — if they ask little gifts 
from many persons, there will by-and-bye grow from 
straws a mighty heap. And have your sister and 
your mother, and your nurse, too, keep plucking at 
your lover ; quickly comes the spoil that is sought 
by many hands. When pretext fails for asking gifts, 
have a eake to be sign to him your birthday is come. 

■ 95 "Take care lest he love without a rival, and 
feel secure ; love lasts not well if you give it naught 
to fight. Let him see the traces of a lover o'er all 
your couch, and note about your neck the livid marks 
of passion. Above all else, have him see the presents 
another has sent. If no one has sent, you must ask 
of the Sacred Way." When you have taken from 

353 

\ A 



OVID 



cum multa abstuleris, ut non tamen omnia donet, 

quod numquam reddas, commodet, ipsa roga ! 
lingua iuvet mentemque tegat — blandire noceque ; 

inpia sub dulci melle venena latent. 
Haec si praestiteris usu mihi cognita longo, 105 

nec tulerint voces ventus et aura meas, 
saepe mihi dices vivae bene, saepe rogabis, 

ut mea defunctae molliter ossa cubent." 
Vox erat in cursu, cum me mea prodidit umbra, 

at nostrae vix se continuere manus, 110 
quin albam raramque comam lacrimosaque vino 

lumina rugosas distraherentque genas. 
di tibi dent nullosque Lares inopemque senectam, 

et longas hiemes perpetuamque sitim ! 

IX 

Militat omnis amans, et habet sua castra Cupido ; 

Attice, crede mihi, militat omnis amans. 
quae bello est habilis, Veneri quoque convenit aetas. 

turpe senex miles, turpe senilis amor, 
quos petiere duces animos 1 in milite forti, 5 

hos petit in socio bella puella viro. 2 
pervigilant ambo ; terra requiescit uterque — 

ille fores dominae servat, at ille ducis. 
militis officium longa est via ; mitte puellam, 

strenuus exempto fine sequetur amans. 10 

1 Rautenherg 2 toro Hein. Mtrk. 

354 



THE AiMORES I. is 



him many gifts, in ease he still give up not all 
he has, yourself ask him to lend — what you never 
will restore ! Let your tongue aid you, and 
cover up your thoughts — wheedle while you despoil ; 
wicked poisons have for hiding-place sweet honey. 

105 ci jf y OU f u ]fj] these precepts, learned by me 
from long experience, and wind and breeze carry 
not my words away, you will often speak me well as 
long as I live, and often pray my bones lie softly 
when I am dead." 

109 Her words were still running, when my 
shadow betrayed me. But my hands could scarce 
restrain themselves from tearing her sparse white 
hair, and her eyes, all lachrymose from wine, and her 
wrinkled cheeks. May the gods give you no abode 
and helpless age, and long winters and everlasting" 
thirst ! 



IX 

Every lover is a soldier, and Cupid has a camp of 
his own ; Atticus, believe me, every lover is a soldier. 
The age that is meet for the wars is also suited to 
Venus. 'Tis unseemly for the old man to soldier, 
unseemly for the old man to love. The spirit that 
captains seek in the valiant soldier is the same the 
fair maid seeks in the man who mates with her. 
Both wake through the night ; on the ground each 
takes his rest — the one guards his mistress's door, 
the other his captain's. The soldier's duty takes 
him a long road ; send but his love before, and the 
strenuous lover, too, will follow without end. He 



355 

A A 2 



OVID 



ibit in advevsos montes duplieataque nimbo 

flumina, congestas exteret ille nives, 
net 1 f'reta pressurus tumidos cansabitur Euros 

aptaque verrendis sideva quaeret aquis. 
quis nisi vel miles vel amans et frigora noctis 15 

et denso mixtas perferet imbre nives ? 
mittitur infestos alter speculator in hostes ; 

in rivale oculos alter, ut hoste, tenet, 
ille graves urbes, hie durae limen amicae 

obsidet ; hie portas frangit, at ille fores. 20 
Saepe soporatos invadere profuit hostes 

caedere et armata vulgus inerme maim, 
sic fera Threicii ceciderunt agmina Rhesi, 
^et dominum capti deseruistis equi. 
saepe maritorum somnis utuntur amantes, 25 

et sua sopitis hostibus anna movent, 
custodum transire manus vigilumque catervas 

militis et miseri semper amantis opus. 
Mars dubius nec certa Venus ; victique resurgunt, 

quosque neges umquam posse iacere, cadunt. 30 
Ergo desidiam quicumque vocabat amorera, 

desinat. ingenii est experientis amor, 
ardet in abdueta Briseide magnus Achilles — 

dum licet, Argivas frangite, Troes, opes ! 
Hector ab Andromaches conplexibus ibat ad arma, 35 

et, galeam caj)iti quae daret, uxor erat. 
summa ducunv, Atrides, visa Priameide fertur 

Maenadis effusis obstipuisse comis. 



a Under the arms of Ulysses and Diomedes. 

356 



THE AMORES I. ix 



will climb opposing mountains and cross rivers 
doubled by pouring rain, he will tread the high- 
piled snows, and when about to ride the seas he 
will not prate of swollen East-winds and look for 
fit stars ere sweeping the waters with his oar. Who 
but either soldier or lover will bear alike the cold 
of night and the snows mingled with dense rain ? 
The one is sent to scout the dangerous foe ; the 
other keeps eyes upon his rival as on a foeman. 
The one besieges mighty towns, the other the 
threshold of an unyielding mistress ; the other 
breaks in doors, the one, gates. 

21 Oft hath it proven well to rush on the enemy 
sunk in sleep, and to slay with armed hand the 
unarmed rout. Thus fell the lines of Thracian 
Rhesus," and you, O captured steeds, left your lord 
behind. Oft lovers, too, take vantage of the hus- 
band's slumber, and bestir their own weapons while 
the enenrylies asleep. To pass through companies of 
guards and bands of sentinels is ever the task both 
of soldier and wretched lover. Mars is doubtful, 
and Venus, too, not sure ; the vanquished rise 
again, and they fall you would say could never be 
brought low. 

31 Then whoso hath called love spiritless, let him 
cease. Love is for the soul ready for any proof. 
Aflame is great Achilles for Briseis taken away — 
men of Troy, erush while ye may, the Argive 
strength ! Hector from Andromache's embrace 
went forth to arms, and 'twas his wife that set the 
helmet on his head. The greatest of captains, 
Atreus' son, they say, stood rapt at sight of Priam's 
daughter, 6 Maenad-like with her streaming hair. 
* Cassandra and Agamemnon. 

357 



OVID 



Mars quoque deprensus fabrilia vincula sensit ; 

notior in caelo fabula nulla fuit. 40 
ipse ego segnis eram diseinctaque in otia natus ; 

mollierant animos lectus et umbra meos. 
inpulit ignavum formosae cura puellae 

iussit et in eastris aera merere suis. 
inde vides agilem nocturnaque bella gerentem. 45 

qui nolet fieri desidiosus, araet ! 



X 

Qualis ab Eurota Phrygiis avecta carinis 

coniugibus belli causa duobus erat, 
qualis erat Lede, quam plumis abditus albis 

callidus in falsa lusit adulter ave, 
qualis Amymone siccis erravit in agris, 1 5 

cum premeret summi verticis urna comas — 
talis eras ; aquilamque in te taurumque timebam, 

et quidquid magno de love fecit amor. 
Nunc timor omnis abest, animique resanuit error, 

nec facies oculos iam capit ista meos. 10 
cur sim rautatus, quaeris ? quia munera poscis. 

haec te non patitur causa placere mihi. 
donee eras simplex, animum cum corpore amavi ; 

nunc mentis vitio laesa figura tua est. 
et puer est et nudus Amor; sine sordibus annos 15 

et nullas vestes,, ut sit apertus, habet. 

1 Argis Burm. 

° The tale of Mars and Venus and Vulcan, told in Odyssey 
viii. 266-369. 

6 I.e. The couch on which he wrote his verses lying in the 
shade. 

353 



THE AMORES I. x 



Mars, too, was caught, and felt the bonds of the 
smith ; no tale was better known in heaven.' 7 For 
myself, my bent was all to dally in ungirt idleness ; 
my couch and the shade 6 had made my temper 
mild. Love for a beautiful girl has started me from 
craven ways and bidden me take service in her camp. 
For this you see me full of action, and waging the 
wars of night. Whoso would not lose all his spirit, 
let him love ! 



X 

Such as was she who was carried from the 
Eu rotas in Phrygian keel to be cause of war to 
her two lords ; such as was Leda, whom the cunning 
lover deceived in guise of the bird with gleaming 
plumage ; such as was Amymone, going through 
thirsty fields with full urn pressing the loeks on her 
head — such were you ; and in my love for you I 
feared the eagle and the bull, and what other form 
soever love has caused great Jove to take. 

9 Now my fear is all away, and my heart is healed 
of straying ; those charms of yours no longer take 
my eyes. Why am I changed, you ask ? Because 
you demand a price. This is the cause that will 
not let you please me. As long as you were simple, 
I loved you soul and body ; now your beauty is 
marred by the fault of your heart. Love is both a 
child and naked : his guileless years and lack of 
raiment are sign that lie is free. Why bid the child 

c Sent by her father Danaus for water, she attracted 
Neptune. 

359 



OVID 



quid puerum Veneris pretio prostare iubetis? 

quo pretium condat, 1 non habet ille sinum ! 
nec Venus apta feris Veneris nee filius arrais — 

non decet inbelles aera merere deos. 20 
Stat meretrix certo cuivis niercabilis aere, 

et miseras iusso corpore quaerit opes ; 
devovet imperium tamen haec lenonis avari 

et, quod vos facitis sponte, coacta facit. 
Sumite in exemplum pecudes ratione carentes ; 25 

turpe eritj ingenium mitius esse feris. 
non equa munus equum, non taurum vacca poposcit ; 

non aries placitam munere captat ovem. 
sola viro mulier spoliis exultat ademptis, 

sola locat noctes, sola locanda venit, 30 
et vendit quod utrumque iuvat quod uterque petebat, 

et pretium, quanti gaudeat ipsa, facit. 
quae Venus ex aequo ventura est grata duobus, 

altera cur illam vendit et alter emit ? 
cur mihi sit damno, til)i sit lucrosa voluptas, 35 

quam socio motu femina virque ferunt ? 
Non bene conducti vendunt periuria testes, 

non bene selecti iudicis area patet. 
turpe reos empta miseros defendere lingua ; 

quod faciat magnas, turpe tribunal, opes ; 40 
turpe tori reditu census augere paternos, 

et faciem lucro prostituisse suam. 
gratia pro rebus merito debetur inemptis ; 

pro male conducto gratia nulla toro. 

1 condas P. 



a Sinus, a pocket-like fold in the ancient garment. 
6 One of the praetor's panel. 

360 



THE AM ORES I. x 



of Venus offer himself fov gain? He lias no poeket 
where to put away his gain ! a Neither Venus nor 
her son is apt at service of cruel arms — it is not 
meet that unwarlike gods should draw the soldier's 
pay. 

21 'Tis the harlot stands for sale at the fixed price 
to anyone soe'er, and wins her wretched gains with 
body at the call ; yet even she calls curses on the 
power of the greedy pander, and does beeause 
compelled what you perform of your own will. 

25 Look for pattern to the beasts of the field, un- 
reasoning though they are ; 'twill shame you to find 
the wild things gentler than yourself. Mare never 
claimed gift from stallion, nor cow from bull ; the 
ram courts not the favoured ewe with gift. 'Tis only 
woman glories in the spoil she takes from man, she 
only hires out her favours, she only eomes to be 
hired, and makes a sale of what is delight to both 
and what both wished, and sets the priee by the 
measure of her own delight. The love that is to 
be of equal joy to both — why should the one make 
sale of it, and the other purchase ? Why should 
my pleasure cause me loss, and yours to you bring 
gain — the pleasure that man and woman both 
contribute to ? 

37 It is not honour for witnesses to make false 
oaths for gain, nor for the chosen juror's b purse to lie 
open for the bribe. 'Tis base to defend the wretched 
culprit with purchased eloquence ; the court that 
makes great gains is base ; 'tis base to swell a 
patrimony with a revenue from love, and to offer 
one's own beauty for a price. Thanks are due and 
deserved for boons unbought ; no thanks are felt 
for love that is meanly hired. He who has made 

361 



OVID 



omnia conductor solvit ; mercede soluta 45 

non manet officio debitor ille tuo. 
parcite, formosae, pretium pro nocte pacisci ; 

non habet eventus sordida praeda bonos. 
non fuit armillas tanti pepigisse 1 Sabinas, 

ut premerent sacrae virginis anna caput ; 50 
e quibus exierat, traiecit viscera ferro 

Alius, et poenae causa monile fuit. 
Nec tamen indignum est a divite praemia posci ; 

munera poscenti quod dare possit, habet. 
carpite de plenis pendentes vitibus uvas ; 55 

praebeat Alcinoi poma benignus ager ! 
officium pauper numerat studiumque fidemque; 

quod quis habet., dominae conferat omne suae, 
est quoque carminibus meritas celebrare puellas 

dos mea ; quam volui, nota fit arte mea. 60 
scindentur vestes, gemmae frangentur et aurum ; 

carmina quam tribuent, fama perennis erit. 
nec dare, sed pretium posci dedignor et odi ; 

quod nego poscenti, desine velle, dabo ! 

XI 

Colligere incertos et in ordine ponere crines 
docta neque ancillas inter habenda Nape, 
1 eligisse P : tetigisse s : pepigisse sinistras ed. prin. 

a The Vestal Tarpeia asked as the price of her treason 
what the Sabines had on their left arms, meaning their 
armlets of gold, but was crushed beneath the shields they 
carried there. 



362 



THE AMORES I. xi 



the hire pays all ; when the price is paid he remains 
no more a debtor for your favour. Spare, fair ones, 
to ask a price for your love ; a sordid gain can bring 
no good in the end. 'Twas not worth while for the 
holy maid to bargain for the Sabine armlets, only 
that arms should crush her down ; a a son once 
pierced with the sword the bosom whence he came, 
and a necklace was the cause of the mother's pain. 6 

53 And yet it is no shame to ask for presents from 
the rich ; they have wherefrom to give you when 
you ask. Pluck from full vines the hanging clusters ; 
let the genial field of Aleinous yield its fruits ! He 
who is poor counts out to you as pay his service, 
zeal, and faithfulness ; the kind of wealth each has, 
let him bring it all to the mistress of his heart. 
My dower, too, it is to glorify the deserving fair in 
song ; whoever I have willed is made famous by my 
art. Gowns will be rent to rags, and gems and gold 
be broke to fragments ; the glory my songs shall 
give will last for ever. 'Tis not the giving but the 
asking of a price, that 1 despise and hate. What I 
refuse at your demand, cease only to wish, and I 
will give ! 



XI 

Nape, O adept in gathering and setting in order 
scattered locks, and not to be numbered among 
handmaids, O Nape known for useful ministry in 

6 Knowing that the Fates had decreed his death in case 
lie went, Eriphyle, for a necklace, caused her husband 
Amphiaraus to be one of the seven against Thebes, and was 
slain by Alcmaeon, her son. 

3»3 



OVID 



inque ministeriis furtivae cognita noctis 

utilis et dandis ingeniosa notis 
saepe venire ad me dubitantem hortata Corinnam, 5 

saepe laboranti fida reperta mihi — 
accipe et ad dominam peraratas mane tabellas 

perfer et obstantes sedula pelle moras ! 
nee silicum venae nec durum in pectore ferrum, 

nec tibi simplicitas ordine maior adest. 10 .. 

credibile est et te sensisse Cupidinis arcus — 

in me militiae signa tuere tuae ! 
si quaeret quid agam, spe noctis vivere dices ; 

cetera fert blanda cera notata manu. 
Dum loquor, hora fugit. vacuae bene redde 

tabellas, 15 

verum continuo fac tamen ilia legat. 
adspicias oculos mando frontemque legentis ; 

e tacito vultu scire futura licet, 
nec mora, perlectis rescribat multa, iubeto ; 

odi, cum late splendida cera vacat. 20 
conprimat ordinibus versus, oculosque moretur 

margine in extremo littera rasa meos. 
Quid digitos opus est graphio lassare tenendo ? 

hoc habeat scriptum tota tabella " veni ! " 
non ego victrices lauro redimire tabellas 25 

nec Veneris media ponere in aede morer. 
subscribam : " veneri fidas sibi naso ministras 

DEDICAT, AT NUPER VILE FUISTIS ACER." 



3 6 4 



THE AMOHES I. xi 



the stealthy night and skilled in the giving- of the 
signal, oft urging Corinna when in doubt to conic 
to me, often found tried and true to me in times 
of trouble — receive and take early to your mistress 
these tablets I have inscribed, and care that 
nothing hinder or delay ! Your breast has in it 
no vein of flint or unyielding iron, nor are you 
simpler than befits your station. One could believe 
you, too, had felt the darts of Cupid — in aiding 
rne defend the standards of your own campaigns ! 
Should she ask how I fare, you will say 'tis my 
hope of her favour that lets me live ; as for the rest, 
'tis charactered in the wax by my fond hand. 

15 While I speak, the hour is flying. Give her the 
tablets while she is happily free, but none the less 
see that she reads them straight. Regard her eves 
and brow, I enjoin you, as she reads ; though 
she speak not, you may know from her face 
what is to come. And do not wait, but bid her 
write much in answer when she has read ; I hate 
when a fine, fair page is widely blank. See she 
pack the lines together, and long detain mv eyes 
with letters traced on the outermost marge. 

23 What need to tire her fingers by holding of the 
pen ? Let the whole tablet have writ on it only 
this : ' f Come ! " Then straight would I t;ike the 
conquering tablets, and bind them round with laurel, 
and hang them in the mid of Venus' shrine. I 
would write beneath: "to venus naso dedicates his 

FAITHFUL AIDS; YET HUT NOW YOU WERE ONLY MEAN 
MAPLE." 



36S 



OVID 



XII 

Flete meos casus — tristes rediere tabellae 

infelix hodie littera posse negat. 
omina sunt aliquid ; modo cum discedere vellet, 

ad limen digitos restitit icta Nape, 
raissa foras iterum limen transire memento 5 

cautius atque alte sobria ferre pedem ! 
Ite hinc, difficiles, funebria ligna, tabellae, 

tuque, negaturis cera referta notis ! — 
quam, puto, de longae collectam flore cicutae 

melle sub infami Corsica misit apis. 10 
at tamquam minio penitus medicata rubebas — 

ille color vere sanguinolentus erat. 
proiectae triviis iaceatis, inutile lignum, 

vosque rotae frangat praetereuntis onus ! 
ilium etiam, qui vos ex arbore vertit in usum, 15 

convincam puras non habuisse manus. 
praebuit ilia arbor niisero suspendia collo, 

carnifici dii'as praebuit ilia cruces ; 
ilia dedit turpes ravis 1 bubonibus umbras, 

vulturis in ramis et strigis ova tulit. 20 
his ego commisi nostros insanus amores 

molliaque ad dominam verba ferenda dedi ? 
aptius hae capiant vadimonia garrula cerae, 

quas aliquis duro cognitor ore legat ; 
inter ephemeridas melius tabulasque iacerent, 25 

in quibus absumptas fleret avarus opes. 

1 ravis X. Hein.: rasis P: raris Arund.: raucis many. 
3 66 



THE AM ORES I. xii 



XII 

Weep for my misfortune — my tablets have returned 
with gloomy news ! The unhappy missive says : 
" Not possible to-day." There is something in omens ; 
just now as Nape would leave, she tripped her toe 
upon the threshold and stopped. When next you 
are sent abroad, remember to take more care as you 
cross, and soberly to lift your foot full clear ! 

7 Away from me, ill-natured tablets, funereal 
pieces of wood, and you, wax close writ with charac- 
ters that will say me nay ! — wax which I think was 
gathered from the flower of the long hemlock by 
the bee of Corsica and sent us under its ill-famed 
honey. Yet you had a blushing hue, as if tinctured 
deep with minium — but that colour was really a colour 
from blood. Lie there at the crossing of the ways, 
where I throw yon, useless sticks, and may the 
passing wheel with its heavy load crush you ! Yea, 
and the man who converted you from a tree to an' 
object for use, 1 will assure you, did not have pure 
hands. That tree, too, lent itself to the hanging of 
some wretched neck, and furnished the cruel cross to 
the executioner; it gave its foul shade to hoarse 
horned owls, and its branches bore up the eggs of 
the screech-owl and the vulture. To tablets like 
these did I insanely commit my loves and give my 
tender words to be carried to my lady ? More fitly 
would such tablets receive the wordy bond, for some 
judge to read in dour tones ; 'twere better they 
should lie among day-ledgers, and accounts in which 
some miser weeps o'er money spent. 

367 



OVID 



Ergo ego vos rebus duplices pro nomine sensi. 

auspicii numerus lion er;it ipse boni. 
quid precer iratus, nisi vos cariosa senectus 

rodat, et inmundo cera sit alba situ ? 30 

XIII 

I am super oeeanum venit a seniore marito 

flava pruinoso quae vehit axe diem. 
"Quo properas, Aurora? mane! — sic Memnonis 
umbris 

annua sollemni caede parentet avis ! 
nunc iuvat in teneris dominae iacuisse lacertis ; 5 

si quando, lateri nunc bene iuncta meo est. 
nunc etiam somni pingues et frigidus aer, 

et liquidum tenui gutture cantat avis, 
quo properas, ingrata viris, ingrata puellis ? 

roscida purpurea supprime lora manu ! 10 
Ante tuos ortus melius sua sidera servat 

navita nec media nescius errat aqua ; 
te surgit quamvis lassus veniente viator, 

et miles saevas aptat ad arma manus. 
prima bidente vides oneratos arva colentes ; 15 

prima vocas tardos sub iuga panda boves. 
tu pueros somno fraudas tradisque magistris, 

ut subeant tenerae verbera saeva manus ; 1 
1 15-18 omitted by P s : elsewhere after 10. 

a They were tabellae duplices, double tablets. 

6 Tithonus was immortal, but not immortally young. 

From the ashes of Memnon, Aurora's son, king of 

368 



THE AMORES 1. xiii 



27 Yes, I have found you double in your dealings, 
to accord with your name." 6 Your very number was 
an augury not good. What prayer should I make in 
my anger, unless that rotten old age eat you away, 
and your wax grow colourless from foul neglect? 

XIII 

She is coming already over the ocean from her 
too-ancient husband b — she of the golden hair who 
with rimy axle brings the day. 

3 " Whither art thou hasting, Aurora ? Stay ! — so 
may his birds each year make sacrifice to the shades 
of Memnon their sire in the solemn combat ! c 'Tis 
now I delight to lie in the tender arms of my love ; 
if ever, 'tis now I am happy to have her close by my 
side. Now, too, slumber is deep and the air is cool, 
and birds chant liquid song from their slender throats. 
Whither art thou hasting, O unwelcome to men, 
unwelcome to maids ? Check with rosy hand the 
dewy rein ! 

11 " Before thy rising the seaman better observes 
his stars, and does not wander blindly in mid water ; 
at thy coming rises the wayfarer, however wearied, 
and the soldier fits his savage hands to arms. Thou 
art the first to look on men tilling the field with the 
heavy mattock ; thou art the first to summon the 
slow-moving steer beneath the curved yoke. Thou 
cheatest boys of their slumbers and givest them over 
to the master, that their tender hands may yield to 
the cruel stroke ; and likewise many dost thou send 

Ethiopia, sprang the Memnonides, birds which honoured him 
in the manner described. 

369 

H B 



OVID 



atque eadem sponsum multos 1 ante atria mittis, 

unius ut verbi grandia damna ferant. 
nec tu consulto, nee tu iueunda diserto ; 

oogitur ad lites surgere uterque novas. 
tUj cum feminei possint cessare labores, 

lanificam revocas ad sua pensa manuni. 
Omnia perpeterer — sed surgere mane puellas, 

quis nisi cui non est ulla ]>uella ferat ? 
optavi quotiens, ne nox tibi cedere vellet, 

ne fugerent vultus sidera mota tuos ! 
optavi quotiens, aut ventus frangeret axem, 

aut caderet spissa nube retentus equus ! 2 
invida, quo properas ? quod erat tibi filius ater, 

materni fuerat pectoris ille color. 
Titliono vellem de te narrare liceret ; 

femina non caelo turpior ulla foret. 
ilium dum refugis, longo quia grandior aevo, 

surgis ad invisas a sene mane rotas, 
at si, quern mavis, 3 Cephalum conplexa teneres, 

clamares : " lente currite, noctis equi !" 
Cur ego plectar amans, si vir tibi marcet ab annis 

num me nupsisti conciliante seni ? 
adspice, quot somnos iuvcni donarit amato 

Luna ! — neque illius forma secunda tuae. 
ipse deum genitor, ne te tarn saepe videret, 

commisit noctes in sua vota duas." 

1 So Withof: sponsum cultos P : sponsum consulti 
sponsum cives Pa.: atque vades sponsum stultos Ehw. 

2 31, 32 omitted by P s : 

quid, si Cephalio numquam flagraret araore ? 
an putat ignotam nequitiam esse suani ? 

3 ma-sis Iiiese : malis Merk.: magis P : manibus s. 

37° 



THE AMORES I. xiii 



as sponsors before the court, to undergo great losses 
through a single word. Thou bringest joy neither 
to lawyer nor to pleader ; eaeli is ever compelled to 
rise for cases new. 'Tis thou, when women might 
cease from toil, who callest back to its task the hand 
that works the wool. 

25 " I could endure all else — but who, unless he 
were one without a maid, could bear that maids 
should rise betimes ? How often have I longed 
that night should not give place to thee, that the 
stars should not be moved to fly before thy face ! 
How often have I longed that either the wind should 
break thine axle, or thy steed be tripped by dense 
cloud, and fall ! O envious, whither dost thou haste ? 
The son born to thee was black, and that colour 
was the hue of his mother's heart. 

35 « j W ould Tithonus were free to tell of thee ; 
no woman in heaven would be known for greater 
shame. Flying from him because long ages older, 
thou risest early from the ancient man to go to 
the chariot-Avheels he hates. Yet, hadst thou thy 
favoured Cephalus in thy embrace, thou wouldst cry : 
' Run softly, steeds of night ! ' 

41 " Why should I be harried in love because thy 
mate is wasting with years ? Didst thou wed an 
ancient man because I made the match ? Look, how 
many hours of slumber has Luna bestowed upon the 
youth she loves ! a — and her beauty is not second to 
thine. The very father of the gods, that he need 
not see thee so oft, made two nights into one to 
favour his desires." b 

a Endytnion. 

6 Jove and Alcmene, mother of Hercules. 



371 

B B 2 



OVID 



Iurgia finievam. scires audisse : rubebat — 
nee tamen adsueto tardius orta dies ! 

XIV 

Dicebam " medicare tuos desiste capillos ! " 

tingere quam possis, iam tibi nulla coma est. 
at si passa fores, quid erat spatiosius illis ? 

contigerant imum, qua patet usque, latus. 
quid, quod erant tenues, et quos ornare timeres ? 5 

vela colorati qualia Seres habent, 
vel pede quod gracili deducit aranea filum, 

cum leve deserta sub trabe nectit opus, 
nec tamen ater erat nec erat tamen aureus ille, 

sed, quamvis neuter, mixtus uterque color — 10 
qualem clivosae madidis in vallibus Idae 

ardua derepto cortice cedrus habet. 
Adde, quod et dociles et centum flexibus apti 

et tibi nullius causa doloris erant. 
non acus abrupit, non vallum pectinis illos. 15 

ornatrix tuto corpore semper erat ; 
ante meos saepe est oculos ornata nec umquam 

bracchia derepta saucia fecit acu. 
sacpe etiam nondum digestis mane capillis 

purpureo iacuit semisupina toro. 20 
turn quoque erat neclecta decens, ut Threcia Bacche, 

cum temere in viridi gramine lassa iacet. 
Cum graciles essent tamen et lanuginis instar, 

heu, male 1 vexatae quanta tulere comae ! 
1 male P s : mala vuly. 

372 



THE AMORES I. xiv 



47 I had brought my chiding to an end. You 
might know she had heard : she blushed — and yet 
the day arose no later than its wont ! 

XIV 

I used to say: "Stop drugging that hair of yours !" 
Now you have no locks to dye ! Yet, had you suffered 
it, what were more abundant than they ? They had 
come to touch your side even to its lowest part. 
Yes, and they were fine in texture, so fine that you 
feared to dress them ; they were like the gauzy 
coverings the dark-skinned Seres wear, or the thread 
drawn out by the slender foot of the spider when he 
weaves his delicate work beneath the deserted beam. 
And yet their colour was not black, nor yet was it 
golden, but, although neither, a mingling of both 
hues — such as in the dewy vales of precipitous Ida 
belongs to the lofty cedar stripped of its bark. 

13 Add that they were both docile and suited to a 
hundred ways of winding, and never caused you 
whit of pain. The needle did not tear them, nor 
the palisade of the comb. The hair-dresser's person 
was ever safe ; oft has my love's toilet been made 
before my eyes, and she never snatched up hairpin 
to wound her servant's arms. Often, too, in early 
morning when her hair was not yet dressed, she has 
lain half supine on her purple couch. Even then, in 
her neglect, she was comely, like a Thracian Bacchante 
lying careless and wearied on the green turf. 

23 And yet, seeing they were delicate and like 
to down, alas, what woes were theirs, and what 
tortures they endured ! With what patience did 



373 



OVID 



quam se praebuerunt ferro patienter et igni, 25 

ut fieret torto nexilis 1 orbe sinus ! 
clamabam : " scelus est istos, scelus urere crines ! 

sponte decent ; capiti, ferrea, parce tuo ! 
vim procul hinc remove ! non est, qui debeat uri ; 

erudit 2 admotas ipse capillus acus." 30 
Formosae periere comae — quas vellet Apollo, 

quas vellet capiti Bacchus inesse suo ! 
illis contulerim, quas quondam nuda Dione 

pingitur umenti sustinuisse manu. 
quid male dispositos quereris periisse capillos ? 35 

quid speculum maesta ponis, inepta, manu ? 
non bene consuetis a te spectaris ocellis ; 

ut placeas, debes inmemor esse tui. 
non te cantatae laeserunt paelicis herbae, 

non anus Haemonia perfida lavit aqua ; 40 
nec tibi vis morbi nocuit — procul omen abesto ! — 

nec minuit densas invida lingua comas. 
. facta manu culpaque tua dispendia sentis ; 

ipsa dabas capiti mixta venena tuo. 
Nunc tibi captivos mittet Germania crines ; 45 

culta triumphatae munere gentis eris. 
o quam saepe comas aliquo mirante rubebis, 

et dices : " empta nunc ego merce probor, 
nescio quam pro me laudat nunc iste Sygambram. 

fama tamen meniini cum fuit ista mea." 50 

1 nexilis vuhj. : rexilis P : textilis s: flexilis Burm. N4m. 

2 circuit Martinon. 

a Pliny mentions a picture of Venus rising from the sea, 
by Apelles. 



374 



THE A MORES I. xiv 



they yield themselves to iron and fire to form the 
elose-curling ringlet with its winding orb ! I kept 
crying out : " 'T is crime, 't is crime to burn those 
tresses ! They are beautiful of themselves ; spare 
your own head, O iron-hearted girl ! Away from 
there with force ! That is no hair should feel the 
fire ; your eurls themselves can sehool the irons you 
apply ! " 

31 The beautiful tresses are no more — such as 
Apollo could desire, sueh as Baechus could desire, 
for their own heads ! I could compare with them the 
tresses which nude Dione is painted holding up of 
yore with dripping fingers. a Why do you lament the 
ruin of your ill-ordered hair ? why lay aside your 
mirror with sorrowing hand, silly girl ? You are 
gazed upon by yourself with eyes not well accustomed 
to the sight ; to find pleasure there, you must forget 
your old-time self. No rival's enchanted herbs have 
wrought you ill, no treacherous grandam has laved 
your hair with water from Haemonian land ; b nor 
has violent illness harmed — far from us be the omen ! 
— nor envious tongue diminished your dense loeks. 
The loss you feel was wrought you by your own hand 
and fault ; yourself applied the mingled poison to 
your head. 

45 Now Germany will send you tresses from captive 
women ; you will be adorned by the bounty of the 
raee we lead in triumph. O how oft, when someone 
looks at your hair, will you redden, and say : " The 
ware I have bought is what brings me favour now. 
'T is some Sygambrian woman that yonder one is 
praising now, instead of me. Yet 1 remember when 
that glory was my own." 

6 Thessaly was famed as the home of sorcery. 

375 



OVID 



Me miserum ! lacrimas male continet oraque 
dextra 

protegit ingenuas picta rubore genas. 
sustinet antiquos gremio spectatque capillos, 

ei mihi, non illo munera digna loco ! 
Collige cum vultn mentem ! reparabile damnum 

est. 55 

postmodo nativa conspiciere coma. * 

XV 

Quid mihi, Livor edax, ignavos obicis annos, 
ingeniique vocas carmen inertis opus ; 

non me more patrum, dum strenua sustinet aetas, 
praemia militiae pulverulenta sequi, 

nec me verbosas leges ediscere nec me 5 
ingrato vocem prostituisse foro ? 

Mortale est, quod quaeris, opus, mihi fama 
perennis 

quaeritur, in toto semper ut orbe canar. 
vivet Maeonides, Tenedos dum stabit et Ide, 

dum rapidas Simois in mare volvet aquas ; 10 
vivet et Ascraeus, dum mustis uva tumebit, 

dum cadet incurva falce resecta Ceres. 
Battiades semper toto cantabitur orbe ; 

quamvis ingenio non valet, arte valet, 
nulla Sophocleo veniet iactura cothurno ; 15 

cum sole et luna semper Aratus erit ; 
dum fallax servus, durus pater, inproba lena 

vivent et meretrix blanda, Menandros erit; 



n Homer, Heeiod, and Calliinachus are the first three poets 
referred to. 



37« 



THE AMORES I. xv 



51 All, wretched me ! Scarce keeping back her 
tears, with her right hand she covers her face, her 
generous cheeks o'er painted with blushing. The 
hair of yore she holds in her lap and gazes upon — 
alas, me ! a gift unworthy of that place. 

55 Calm your heart, and stop your tears ! Your 
loss is one may be repaired. Not long, and you will 
be admired for locks your very own. 

XV 

Why, biting Envy, dost thou charge me with 
slothful years, and call my song the work of an idle 
wit, complaining that, while vigorous age gives 
strength, I neither, after the fashion of our fathers, 
pursue the dusty prizes of a soldier's life, nor learn 
garrulous legal lore, nor set my voice for common 
case in the ungrateful forum ? 

7 It is but mortal, the work you ask of me ; but my 
quest is glory through all the years, to be ever known 
in song throughout the earth. Maeonia's son a will 
live as long as Tenedos shall stand, and Ida, as 
long as Simois shall roll his waters rushing to the 
sea ; the poet of Ascra, too, will live as long as 
the grape shall swell for the vintage, as long as 
Ceres shall fall beneath the stroke of the curving 
sickle. The son of Battus shall aye be sung through 
all the earth ; though he sway not through genius, 
he sways through art. No loss shall ever come to 
the buskin of Sophocles ; as long as the sun and 
moon Aratus shall live on ; as long as tricky slave, 
. hard father, treacherous bawd, and wheedling harlot 
shall be found, Menander will endure ; Ennius the 



377 



OVID 



Ennius arte carens animosique Accius oris 

casurum nullo tempore nomen habent. 20 
Varronem primamque ratem quae nesciet aetas, 

aureaque Aesonio terga petita duci ? 
carmina sublirais tunc sunt peritura Lucreti, 

exitio terras cum dabit una dies : 
Tityrus et segetes Aeneiaque arma legentur, 25 

Roma triumphati dum caput orbis erit ; 
donee erunt ignes arcusque Cupidinis arma, 

discentur Humeri, culte Tibulle, tui ; 
Gallus et Hesperiis et Gallus notus Eois, 

et sua cum Gallo nota Lycoris erit. 30 
Ergo, cum siliees, cum dens patientis aratri 

depereant aevo, carmina raorte carent. 
cedant carminibus reges regumque triumphi, 

cedat et auriferi ripa benigna Tagi ! 
vilia miretur vulgus ; mihi flavus Apollo 35 

pocula Castalia plena ministret aqua, 
sustineamque coma metuentem frigora myrtum, 

atque ita sollicito multus amante legar ! 
pascitur in vivis Livor ; post fata quiescit, 

cum suus ex merito quemque tuetur honos. 40 
ergo etiam cum me supremus adederit ignis, 

vivam, parsque mei multa superstes erit. 



378 



THE AMORES I. xv 



rugged in art, and Accius of the spirited tongue, 
possess names that will never fade. Varro and the 
first of ships — what generation will fail to know 
of them, and of the golden fleece, the Aesonian 
chieftain's quest ? The verses of sublime Lucretius 
will perish only then when a single day shall give 
the earth to doom. Tityrus and the harvest, and 
the arms of Aeneas, will be read as long as Rome 
shall be capital of the world she triumphs o'er ; as 
long as flames and bow are the arms of Cupid, thy 
numbers shall be conned, O elegant Tibnllus ; Gallus 
shall be known to Hesperia's sons, and Gallus to the 
sons of Eos, and known with Gallus shall his own 
Lycoris be. 

31 Yea, though hard rocks and though the tooth 
of the enduring ploughshare perish with passing 
time, song is untouched by death. Before song let 
monarehs and monarchs' triumphs yield — yield, too, 
the bounteous banks of Tagus bearing gold ! Let 
what is cheap excite the marvel of the crowd ; for 
me may golden Apollo minister full cups from the 
Castalian fount, and may I on my locks sustain the 
myrtle that fears the cold ; and so be ever conned 
by anxious lovers ! It is the living that Envy feeds 
upon ; after doom it stirs no more, when each man's 
fame guards him as he deserves. I, too, when the 
final fires have eaten up my frame, shall still live on, 
and the great part of me survive my death. a 

a This charming poem is a literary convention : compare 
Horace's exegi monumentum (iii. 30), and Shakespeare's 
" Not marble nor the gilded monuments" (Sonnet lv). 



379 



LIBER SECUNDUS 



I 

Hoc quoque conposui Paelignis natus aquosis, 

ille ego nequitiae Naso poeta meae. 
hoc quoque iussit Amor — procul hinc, procul este, 
severae ! 

non cstis teneris apta theatra modis. 
me legat in sponsi facie non frigida virgo, 5 

et rudis ignoto tactus am ore puer ; 
atque aliquis iuvenum quo nunc ego saucius arcu 

agnoscat flammae conscia sign a suae, 
miratusque diu "quo " dicat "ab indice doctus 

conposuit casus iste poeta meos ? " 10 
Ausus eram, memini, caelestia dicere bella 

centimanumque Gyen 1 — et satis oris erat — 
cum male se Tel his ulta est, ingestaque Olympo 

ardua devexum Pelion Ossa tulit. 
in manibus nimbos et cum love fulmen habebarn, 15 

quod bene pro caelo mitteret ille suo — 
Clausit arnica fores ! ego cum love fulmen omisi ; 

excidit ingenio Iuppiter ipse meo. 
Iuppiter, ignoscas ! nil me tua tela iuvabant ; 

clausa tuo maius ianua fulmen habet. 20 

1 Gyan several MSS.: gygen Ps. 
° Sulmo was in a valley with plenteous rains and streams. 
380 



BOOK THE SECOND 



1 

This,, too, is the work of my pen — mine, Naso's, 
bora among the humid Paeligni/ 1 the well-known 
singer of my own worthless ways. This, too, have I 
wrought at the bidding of Love — away from me, far 
away, ye austere fair ! Ye are no fit audience for 
my tender strains. For my readers I want the maid 
not cold at the sight of her promised lover's face, 
and the untaught boy touched by passion till now 
unknown ; and let some youth who is wounded by 
the same bow as I am now, know in my lines .the 
record of his own heart's flame, and, long wondering, 
say : " From what tatler has this poet learned, that 
hehas put in verse my own mishaps ? " 

11 I had dared, I remember, to sing — nor was my 
utterance too weak — of the wars of Heaven, and 
Gyas of the hundred hands, when Earth made her ill 
attempt at vengeance, and steep Ossa, with shelving 
Pelion on its back, was piled upon Olympus. I had 
in hand the thunder-clouds, and Jove with the light- 
ning he was to hurl to save his own heaven. 

17 My beloved closed her door ! I — let fall Jove 
with his lightning ; Jove's very self dropped from my 
thoughts. Jove, pardon me ! Thy bolts could not 
serve me ; that door she closed was a thunderbolt 
greater than thine. I have taken again to my proper 



OVID 



blanditias elegosque lcvis, mea tela, resunipsi ; 

mollierunt duras lenia verba fores, 
carmina sanguineae deducunt cornua hmae, 

et revocant niveos solis euntis equos ; 
carmine dissiliunt abruptis faucibus angues, 25 

inque suos fontes versa recurrit aqua, 
carminibus cessere fores, insertaque posti, 

quamvis robur erat, carmine victa sera est. 
Quid niihi profuerit velox cantatus Achilles ? 

quid pro me Atrides alter et alter agent, 30 
quique tot errando, quot bello, perdidit annos, 

raptus et Haemoniis flebilis Hector equis ? 
at facie tenerae laudata 1 saepe puellae, 

ad vatem, pretium carminis, ipsa venit. 
magna datur merces ! heroum clara valete 35 

nomina ; non apta est gratia vestra mihi ! 
ad mea formosos vultus adhibete, puellae, 

carmina, purpureus quae mihi dictat Amor ! 

II 

Quem penes est dominant servandi cura, Bagoe, 
dum perago tecum pauca, sed apta, vaca. 

hesterna vidi spatiantem luce puellam 
ilia, quae Danai portions agmen habet. 

protinus, ut placuit, misi scriptoque rogavi. 5 
rescripsit trepida " non licet ! " ilia manu ; 

1 So Merk. Post. AV»i. : at facies tenerae laudata Ps : ut 
facies tenerae laurlatast Ehw. Br. : facie Hein. 



382 



THE AMORES II. ii 



anus — the light and bantering elegy ; its gentle 
words have softened the hard-hearted door. Song 
brings down the horns of the blood-red moon, and 
calls back the snowy steeds of the departing sun ; 
song bursts the serpent's jaws apart and robs him of 
his fangs, and sends the waters- rushing back upon 
their source. Song has made doors give way, and 
the bolt inserted in the post, although of oak, has 
been made to yield by song. 

- 9 Of what avail will it be to me to have sung of 
swift Achilles ? What will the sons of Atreus, 
the one or the other, do for me, and he who in 
wandering lost as many years as in war, and Hector 
the lamented, dragged by Haemonian steeds ? But 
a tender beloved, at my oft praising of her beauty 
has come of herself to the poet as the reward for his 
song. Great is my recompense ! Renowned names 
of heroes, fare ye well ; your favours are not the kind 
for me ! And fair ones, turn hither your beauteous 
faces as I sing the songs which rosy Love dictates 
to me ! 

II 

You whose trust is the guarding of your mistress, 
attend, Bagoas, while I say a few words, but apt. 
Yesterday I saw the fair one walking in the portico — 
the one that has the train of Danaus. Forthwith — 
for I was smitten — I sent and asked her favours in 
a note. She wrote back with trembling hand : " It 
is not possible !" and when I asked why "it was not 

° The portico of Augustus' temple of Apollo on the 
Palatine, with the fifty daughters of Danaus in marble. 
Propertius saw its dedication, ii. 31. 

3*3 



OVID 



et, cur non liceat, quaerenti reddita causa est, 

quod nimiuni dominae cura molesta tua est. 
Si sapis, o custos, odium, mihi crede, mereri 

desine ; quem metuit quisque, perisse cupit. 10 
vir quoque non sapiens ; quid enim servare laboret, 

unde nihil, quamvis non tueare, pevit ? 
sed gerat ille suo morem furiosus amori 

et castum, multis quod placet, esse putet ; 
huic furtiva tuo libertas munere detur, 15 

quam dederis illi, reddat ut ilia tibi. 
conscius esse velis — domina est obnoxia servo ; 

conscius esse times — dissimulare licet, 
scripta leget secum — matrem misisse putato ! 

venerit ignotus— postmodo notus erit. 20 
ibit ad adfectam, quae non languebit, amicam : 

visat ! iudiciis aegra sit ilia tuis. 
si faciet tarde, ne te mora longa fatiget, 

inposita gremio stertere fronte potes. 
nec tu, linigeram fieri quid possit ad Isim, 25 

quaesieris nec tu curva theatra time ! 
conscius adsiduos commissi toilet honores — 

quis minor est autem quam tacuisse labor ? 
ille placet versatque domum neque verbera sentit : 

ille potens — alii, sordida turba, iacent. 30 
huic, verae ut lateant causae, finguntur inanes ; 

atque ambo domini, quod probat una, probant. 
cum bene vir traxit vultum rugasque coegit, 

quod voluit fieri blanda puella, facit. 

384 



THE A MO RES II. ii 



possible," gave this reason, that your guard of your 
mistress was too strict. 

9 If you are wise, good guardian, cease, believe me, 
to merit hate ; whom each man fears, he longs to see 
destroyed. Her husband, too, is anything but wise ; 
for why take pains to watch over that from which, 
even did you not guard, nothing would be lost ? 
But let him, mad fool, do as his passion prompts him, 
and let him think she can be chaste who takes the 
eye of many ; be you the means of giving her stolen 
liberty, that she may render back to you the freedom 
you gave to her. 13e willing to conspire with her — the 
mistress is bound to the slave ; fear you to conspire — 
you ean pretend. She will read a missive by herself 
— think that her mother sent it ! One comes not 
known to you — in a moment vou will know him 
well ! She will go to a sick friend, who will not be 
ill — let her go to see her ; let the friend be ill in 
your judgment ! Is she late in coming back, you 
need not let long waiting tire you out, but may lay 
your head in your lap and snore. And make it not 
your business to ask into what happens at linen-elad 
Isis' temple, nor coneern yourself about the curving 
theatre ! The accomplice in a secret will reap con- 
tinual reward — and what is less labour, too, than 
keeping silence ? He is one favoured, and rules in 
the house, and feels no blows ; he is one with power 
— the rest, a mean erowd, are at his feet. For the 
husband empty reasons are fashioned to keep the 
true ones hid ; and both master and mistress approve 
what the mistress alone approves. After her lord 
has put on a scowling face and bent his brows, he 
does what the wheedling wife has willed shall be 
done. 



335 

c c 



OVID 



Sed tamen interdum tecum quoque iurgia nectat, 35 

et simulet lacrimas carnificemque vocet. 
tu contra obicies, quae tuto diluat ilia ; 

in verum 1 falso crimine deme fidem. 
sic tibi semper honos, sic alta peculia crescent. 

haec fac, in exiguo tempore liber eris. 40 
Adspicis indicibus nexas per colla catenas ? 

squalidus orba fide pectora career habet. 
quaerit aquas in aquis et poma fugacia captat 

Tantalus — hoc illi garrula lingua dedit. 
dum nimium servat custos Iunonius Ion, 45 

ante suos annos occidit ; ilia dea est ! 
vidi ego conpedibus liventia crura gerentem, 

unde vir incestum scire coactus erat. 
poena minor merito. nocuit mala lingua duobus ; 

vir doluit, famae damna puella tulit. 50 
crede mihi, nulli sunt crimina grata marito, 

nec quemquamj quamvis audiat, ilia iuvant. 
sen tepet, indicium securas prodis 2 ad aures ; 

sive amat, officio fit miser ille tuo. 
Culpa nec ex facili quamvis manifesta probatur ; -55 

iudicis ilia sui tuta favore venit. 
viderit ipse licet, credet tamen ille neganti 

damnabitque oculos et sibi verba dabit. 
adspiciat dominae lacrimas, plorabit et ipse, 

et dicet : " poenas garrulus iste dabit ! " 60 
quid dispar certamen inis ? tibi verbera victo 

adsuntj in gremio iudicis ilia sedet. 

1 in verum Ps: in vero P 2 s 2 . 

2 prodis P : perdis wily. 

386 



THE AMORES II. ii 



35 But let her sometimes none the less cross words 
with you, too, and feign to weep, and call you 
executioner. You, in turn, will charge her with what 
she can safely explain away ; by false accusation take 
away faith in the true. In this way will your honour 
ever increase, in this way your pile of savings grow 
high. Do this, in short time you will be free. 

41 Do you note that tellers of tales wear chains tied 
round their necks ? The squalid dungeon is the 
home of hearts barren of faith. Tantalus seeks for 
water in the midst of waters and catches at ever 
escaping fruits — that Avas the fate he got for his 
garrulous tongue. Juno's watchman, guarding Io 
too intently, falls before his time ; she — becomes a 
goddess ! I have seen in shackles the livid legs of 
a man who had forced a husband to know himself a 
cuckold. The punishment was less than he deserved. 
His evil tongue brought harm to two ; the hus- 
band suffered grief, the wife the loss of her good 
name. Believe me, accusations are welcome to no 
husband, nor do they please him, even though he 
hear. If he is cool, you bring your traitorous tales 
to careless ears ; if he loves, your service only makes 
him wretched. 

55 Nor is a fault, however manifest, an easy thing to 
prove; the wife comes off unharmed, safe in the favour 
of her judge. Though he himself have seen, he will 
yet believe when she denies, accuse his own eyes, 
and give himself the lie. Let him but look on his 
lady's tears, and he himself, too, will begin to wail, 
and say : " The gabbler that slandered you shall pay 
for it!" Why enter on a contest with odds against 
you ? You will lose and get a flogging in the end, 
while she will look on from the lap of her judge 

337 

c c 2 



OVID 

Non scelus adgredimur, non ad miscenda coimus 
toxica, non stricto fulminat ense maims. 

quaerimus, ut tuto per te possimus amave. 65 
quid precibus nostris mollius esse ]>otest ? 

Ill 

Ei mibi, quod dominam nec vir nec femina servas 

mutua nec Veneris gaudia nosse potes ! 
qui primus pueris genitalia membra recidit, 

vulnera quae fecit, debuit ipse pati. 
mollis in obsequium facilisque rogantibus esses, 5 

si tuus in quavis praetepuisset amor, 
non tu natus equo, non fortibus utibs armis ; 

bellica non dextrae convenit hasta tuae. 
ista mares tractent ; tu spes depone viriles. 

sunt tibi cum domina signa ferenda tua. 10 
banc inple meritis, huius tibi gratia prosit ; 

si careas ilia, quis tuus usus erit ? 
Est etiam facies, sunt apti lusibus anni ; 

indigna est pigro forma perire situ, 
fallere te potuit, quamvis babeare molestus ; 15 

non caret effectu, quod A T oluere duo. 
aptius ut 1 fuerit precibus temptasse, rogamus, 

dum bene ponendi munera tempus babes. 
1 at Xim. 

3 S8 



THE AMORES II. iii 



63 'Tis no crime we are entering on ; we are not 
coming together to mingle poisons ; no drawn sword 
flashes in our hands. What we ask is that you will 
give us the means to love in safety. What can be 
moi'e modest than our prayers ? 



Ill 

Miserable me, that you who guard your mistress 
are neither man nor woman, and cannot know the 
joys of mutual love ! He who first robbed boys of 
their nature should himself have suffered the wounds 
he made. Readily would you be compliant and 
yielding to lovers' prayers, if you had ever grown 
w arm with love for any woman. You were not born 
for a horse, nor for the strenuous service of arms ; 
the warlike spear fits nop your right hand. Let men 
engage in those ways of life ; do you lay aside all 
manly hopes. The standards you bear must be 
of your mistress's service. She is the one for you to 
ply with deserving deeds ; hers is the favour to bring 
you gain ; should you lack her, what then will be 
your use ? 

13 Then, too, she has charms, and her years are 
apt for love's delights ; 'tis a shame for her beauty 
to perish by dull neglect. She could have eluded 
vou, strict guardian though you are called ; what 
two have willed lacks not accomplishment. Yet 
since 'twill be better to have tried entreaty, we 
ask your aid, while you still have power to place 
your favours well. 



3S9 



OVID 



IV 

Non ego mendosos ausim defendere mores 

falsaque pro vitiis anna movere meis. 
confiteor — siquid prodest delicta fateri ; 

in mea nunc demens crimina fassus eo. 
odi, nec possum, cupiens, non esse quod odi ; 5 

heu, quam quae studeas ponere ferre grave est ! 
Nam desunt vires ad me mihi iusque regendum ; 

auferor ut rapida concita puppis aqua, 
non est certa meos quae forma invitet amores — 

centum sunt causae, cur ego semper amera. 10 
sive aliqua est oculos in se deiecta modestos, 

uror, et insidiae sunt pudor ille meae ; 
sive procax aliqua est, capior, quia rustica non est, 

spemque dat in molli mobilis esse toro. 
aspera si visa est rigidasque imitata Sabinas, 15 

velle, sed ex alto dissimulare puto. 
sive es docta, places raras dotata per artes ; 

sive rudis, placita es simplicitate tua. 
est, quae Callimachi prae nostris rustica dicat 

carmina — cui placeo, protinus ipsa placet. 20 
est etiam, quae me vatem et mea cannina culpet — 

culpantis cupiam sustinuisse femur, 
molliter incedit — motu capit ; altera dura est — 

at poterit tacto mollior esse viro. 
haec quia dulce canit flectitque facillima vocem, 25 

oscula cantanti rapta dedisse velim ; 



THE AMORES II. iv 



IV 

I would not venture to defend my faulty morals 
or to take up the armour of lies to shield my 
failings. I confess — if owning my short-comings 
aught avails ; and now, having owned them, I madly 
assail my sins. I hate what I am, and } T et, for all 
my desiring, I cannot but be what I hate ; ah, how 
hard to bear the burden you long to lay aside ! 

7 For I lack the strength and will to rule 
myself ; I am swept along like a ship tossed 
on the rushing flood. 'Tis no fixed beauty that 
calls my passion forth — there are a hundred causes 
to keep me alwa}'s in love. Whether 'tis some fair 
one with modest eyes downcast upon her lap, I am 
aflame, and that innocence is my ensnaring ; whether 
'tis some saucy jade, I am smitten because she is 
not rustic simple, and gives me hope of enjoying 
her supple embrace on the soft couch. If she seem 
austere, and affects the rigid Sabine dame, I judge 
she would yield, but is deep in her deceit. If you 
are taught in books, you win me by your dower of 
rare accomplishments ; if crude, vou win me by 
} r our simple ways. Some fair one tells me Calli- 
machus' songs are rustic beside mine — one who 
likes me I straightway like myself. Another calls 
me no poet, and chides my verses — and I fain would 
clasp the fault-finder to my arms. One treads 
softly — and I fall in love with her step ; another 
is hard — but can be made softer by the touch of love. 
Because this one sings sweetly, with easiest modu- 
lation of the voice, I would snatch kisses as she 
sings ; this other runs with nimble finger over 



391 



OVID 



haec querulas habili percurrit pollice chordas — 

tarn doctas quis uon possit amare maims ? 
ilia placet gestu numerosaque bracchia ducit 

et tenenim molli torquet ab arte latus — 30 
ut taceam de me, qui causa tangor ab omni, 

illic Hippolvtum pone, Priapus erit ! 
tu, quia tarn longa es, veteres heroidas aequas 

et potes in toto multa iacere toro. 
haec habilis brevitate sua est. corrumpor utraque ; 35 

conveniunt voto longa brevisque meo. 
non est culta — subit, quid cultae accedere possit ; 

ornata est — dotes exhibet ipsa suas. 
Candida me capiet, capiet me flava puella, 

est etiam in fusco grata colore Venus. 40 
seu pendent nivea pulli cervice capilli, 

Leda fuit nigra conspicienda coma ; 
sen flavent, placuit croceis Aurora capillis. 

omnibus historiis se meus a])tat amor, 
me nova sollicitat, me tangit serior aetas ; 45 

haec melior, specie corporis ilia placet. 1 
Denique quas tota quisquam probet urbe puellas, 

noster in has omuis ambitiosus amor. 

V 

Nullus amor tanti est — abeas, pharetrate Cupido ! — 
ut mihi sint totiens maxima vota mori. 

1 placet Ps et a!.: sapit Hein. from MSS. 



a Examples of chastit}' and lust. 

392 



THE AMORES II. v 



the querulous string — who could but fall in love 
with such cunning hands ? Another takes me by 
her movement^ swaying her arms in rhythm and 
curving her tender side with supple art — to say 
naught of myself, who take fire from every cause, 
put Hippolytus in my place, and he will be 
Priapus ! a You, because you are so tall, are not 
second to the ancient daughters of heroes, and can 
lie the whole couch's length. Another I find apt be- 
cause she is short. I am undone by both ; tall and 
short are after the wish of my heart. She is not well 
dressed — I dream what dress would add ; she is well 
arrayed — she herself shows off her dower of charms. 
A fair white skin will make prey of me, I am prey 
to the golden-haired, and even a love of dusky 
hue will please. Do dark locks hang on a neck 
of snow — Leda was fair to look upon for her black 
locks ; are the}' of golden hue — Aurora pi eased 
with saffron locks. To all the old tales my 
love can fit itself. Fresh youth steals away my 
heart, I am smitten with later years ; the one has 
more worth, the other wins me with charm of 
person. 

47 In fine, whatever fair ones anyone could praise 
in all the city — my love is candidate for the favours 
of them all. 6 

V 

No love is worth so much — away, Cupid with the 
quiver ! — that so often my most earnest prayer should 
be for death. For death my prayers are, whenever 

6 For spirit, compare Thomas Moore's " The time I've 
lost in ■wooing." 

393 



OVID 



vota mori mea sunt, cum te peccare 1 recordor, 

ei mihi, perpetuum nata puella malum ! 
Non mihi deceptae 2 nudant tua facta tabellae, 5 

nec data furtive munera crimen habent. 
o utinam arguerem sic, ut non vincere possem ! 

me miserum ! quare tarn bona causa mea est ? 
felix, qui quod amat defendere fortiter audet, 

cui sua " non feci ! " dicere arnica potest. 10 
ferreus est nimiumque suo favet ille dolori, 

cui petitur victa palma cruenta rea. 
Ipse miser vidi, cum me dormire putares, 

sobrius adposito crimina vestra mero. 
multa supercilio vidi vibrante loquentes ; 15 

mitibus in vestris pars bona vocis erat. 
non oeuli tacuere tui, conscriptaque vino 

mensa, nec in digitis littera nulla fuit. 
sermonem agnovi, quod non videatur, agentem 

verbaque pro certis iussa valere notis. 20 
iamque frequens ierat mensa conviva relieta ; 

conpositi iuvenes unus et alter erant. 
inproba turn vcro iungentes oscula vidi — 

ilia mihi lingua nexa fuisse liquet — 
qualia non fratri tulerit germana severo, 25 

sed tulerit cupido mollis arnica viro ; 
qualia credibile est non Phoebo ferre Dianam, 3 

sed Venerem Marti saepe tulisse suo. 
"Quid facis?" exclamo, "quo nunc mea gaudia differs? 

iniciam dominas in mea iura manus ! 30 

1 peccare Mueller from P: peccasse vulg. 

2 deprensae Ehw. 

3 So Bent. : Phoebum . . . Dianae MSS. 



394 



THE AMORES II. v 



I think you false to me — ah, girl born for my 
everlasting ill ! 

5 No intercepted note it is that lays bare to me 
your deeds, nor the secret giving of gifts that ac- 
cuses you. Oh, would that my charge Avere such 
that I could not win ! Wretched me ! Avhy is my 
cause so strong ? Happy he who dares boldly de- 
fend his beloved, to whom his mistress can say, " I 
did not do it ! " Iron of heart is he, and too much 
favours his own pain, who would win a bloodstained 
triumph by the downfall of the guilty. 

13 I saw your guilty acts my wretehed self with 
sober eye, when the wine had been placed and you 
thought I slept. I saw you both say many things 
with quiverings of the brow ; in your nods was much 
of speech. Your eyes, too, girl, were not dumb, 
and the table Avas written o'er with Avine, nor did 
any letter fail your fingers. Your speech, too, I 
recognized Avas busied with hidden message, and 
your words charged to stand for certain meanings. 
And iioav the throng of guests had already left the 
board and gone ; there were left a youth or two, 
asleep in wine. 'Twas then indeed I saw you 
sharing shameful kisses — it is clear to me they 
were kisses of the tongue — not such as sister bestoAvs 
on austere brother, but such as yielding SAveetheart 
gives her eager lover ; not such as one could think 
Diana grants to Phoebus, but such as Venus oft 
bestoAved on Mars. 

29 « What are you doing ? " I cry out. " Where 
iioav are you scattering joys that are mine? I Avill 
lay my sovereign hands upon my rights. Those 
kisses are common to you Avith me, and common 



395 



OVID 



haec tibi sunt mecum, niilii sunt communia teeum — 

in bona cur quisqnam tertius ista venit?" 
Haec ego, quaeque dolor linguae dictavit ; at illi 

conscia purpnreus venit in ora pudor, 
quale coloratum Tithoni coniuge caelum 35 

subrubet, aut sponso visa ]iuella novo ; 
quale rosae fulgent inter sua lilia mixtae, 

aut ubi cantatis Luna laborat eqnis, 
aut quod, ne longis flavescere possit ab annis, 

Maeonis Assyrium femina tinxit ebur. 40 
hie erat aut alicui color ille simillimus horum, 

et numquam visu 1 pulchrior ilia fiiit. 
spectabat terrain — terrain spectare decebat ; 

maesta erat in vultu — maesta decenter erat. 
sicut erant, et erant cnlti, laniare capillos 45 

et fuit in teneras impetus ire genas — 
Ut faciem vidi, fortes cecidere lacerti ; 

defensa est armis nostra pnella suis. 
qui modo saevus eram, supplex ultroqne rogavi, 

oscula ne nobis deteriora daret. 50 
risit et ex animo dedit optima — qnalia possent 

exentere irato tela trisulca Iovi ; 
torqueor infelix, ne tarn bona senserit alter, 

et volo non ex hac ilia fuisse nota. 
haec quoqne, quam docni, multo meliora fuerunt, 55 

et quiddam visa est addidicisse novi. 
quod nimium placuere, malum est, quod tota labellis 

lingua tua est nostris, nostra recepta tnis. 
nec tamen hoe unum doleo — non oscula tantum 

inncta queror, quamvis haec quoqne iuncta 
queror ; 60 
ilia nisi in lecto nusquam potuere doceri. 

nescio quis pretium grande magister habet. 

1 visu Hons. : casu MSS. 

396 



THE AMORES II. v 



to me with you — why does any third attempt to 
share those goods ? " 

33 These were my words, and whatever passion 
dictated to my tongue ; but she — her eonscions face 
mantled with ruddy shame, like the sky grown red 
with the tint of Tithonus' bride, or maid gazed on 
by her newly betrothed ; like roses gleaming among 
the lilies where they mingle, or the moon in labour 
with enchanted steeds, or Assyrian ivory Maeonia's 
daughter tinctures to keep long years from yellowing 
it. Like one of these, or very like, was the eolour 
she displayed, and never was she fairer to look upon. 
She kept her eyes on the ground — to keep them 
on the ground was becoming ; there was grief in her 
face — grief made her comely. Just as it was, and 
it was neatly dressed, I Avas moved to tear her 
hair and to fly at her tender cheeks — 

47 When I looked on her face, my brave arms 
dropped ; my love was protected by armour of her own. 
But a moment before in a cruel rage, I was humble 
now, and e'en entreated her to give me kisses not 
less sweet than those. She smiled, and gave me her 
best with all her heart — kisses that could make irate 
Jove let drop from his hand the three-forked bolt ; 
I am in wretched torment for fear my rival has tasted 
them as sweet, and I would not have his kisses of 
the same seal. Mueh better, too, were these than I 
had taught, and something new she seemed to have 
learned. Their too much pleasing was an ill sign, 
for her kiss was voluptuous. Yet this one thing is 
not all my grief — I complain not merely that her 
kisses are elose, and yet that they are close I do 
complain ; those kisses could have been no wise but 
lewdly taught. Some master has had a great reward 
for his teaching. 

397 



OVID 



VI 

Psittacus, Eois inritatrix ales ab Indis, 

occidit — exequias ite frequenter, aves ! 
ite, piae volucres, et plangite pectora pinnis 

et rigido teneras ungue notate genas ; 
horrida pro maestis lanieter plnma capillis, 5 

pro longa resonent carniina vestra tuba ! 
quod scelus Ismarii quereris, Philomela, tyranni, 

expleta est annis ista querela suis ; 
alitis in rarae miserum devertere funus — 

magna, sed antiqua est causa doloris Itys. 10 
Omnes, quae liquido libratis in aere cursus, 

tn tamen ante alios, turtur amice, dole ! 
plena fuit vobis omni concordia vita, 

et stetit ad finem longa tenaxque fides, 
quod fuit Argolico iuvenis Phoceus Orestae, 15 

hoc tibi, dum licuit, psittace, turtur erat. 
Quid tamen ista fides, quid rari forma coloris, 

quid vox mutandis ingeniosa sonis, 
quid iuvat, ut datus es, nostrae placuisse pnellae ? — 

infelix, avium gloria, nempe iaces ! 20 
tu poteras fragiles pinnis hebetare zmaragdos 

tincta gerens rubro Punica rostra croco. 
non fuit in terris vocum simnlantior ales — 

reddebas blaeso tarn bene verba sono ! 
Raptus es invidia — non tu fera bella movebas ; 25 

garrulus et placidae pacis amator eras. 

° Ismarus wronged Philomela, sister of Procne, his w ife, 
.and the two slew Itys, his son, in revenge. 

398 



THE AM ORES II. vi 



VI * 

Our parrot, winged mimic from Indian land of 
dawn, is no more — come flocking, ye birds, to his 
obsequies ! Come, all ye feathered faithful, come 
beat your breasts with the wing, and mark your 
tender cheeks with the rigid claw ; let your ruffled 
plumage be rent in place of mourning hair, and in 
place of the long trumpet let your songs sound out ! 
If you, Philomela, are lamenting the deed of the 
tyrant of Ismarus," that lament has been fulfilled by 
its term of years ; turn aside to the hapless funeral 
of no common bird — great cause for grief is Itys, 
but belongs to the ancient past. 

11 All ye who poise your flight in liquid air, O 
grieve — yet thou before all others, friendly turtle- 
dove ! The life that you two shared was filled with 
all harmony ; your loyalty was long and firm, and 
stood fast to the end. What the youth of Phocis 
was to Argive Orestes, this was the turtle-dove to 
you, O parrot, so long as fate allowed. 

17 And yet, of what avail that loyalty, of what 
your rare and beauteous colour, of what that voice 
adept in mimicry of sounds, of what my darling's 
favour as soon as you were hers ? — ah, hapless one, 
glory of birds, you surely are no more ! You eould 
dim with your wings the fragile jasper, and your 
beak was Punic-red with ruddy saffron tinge. On 
earth there was no bird could better imitate speech 
— you rendered words so well in your throaty tone ! 

25 'Twas envious fate swept you away — you were 
no mover of battles fierce ; you were a prattling 
lover of plaeid peace. Look ! quails are ever battling 



399 



THE AMORES III. iv 



against us men that Mars girds on death-dealing 
sword ; 'tis we are the target for the spear from 
uneonquered Pallas' hand. For us are bent Apollo's 
flexile bows ; on us descends the bolt from Jove's 
upraised right hand. Fair women the gods on high 
fear to offend even when wronged, and stand in 
awe themselves of those who have felt no awe of 
them. And does anyone care to place pious ineense 
on their altars ? Surely, there should be more 
eourage in men ! 

35 Jove hurls his own lightning on sacred groves 
and citadels, and forbids his bolts to strike the fair 
forsworn. So many have deserved his stroke — 
hapless Semele alone has burned ! Her own com- 
plaisance brought the penalty upon her ; yet, had 
she shunned the coming lover, the father would not 
have filled the mother's office in Jiaechus' birth. a 

41 Why complain I, and seold in the face of all 
heaven ? Gods, too, have eyes, gods, too, have 
hearts ! Were I myself divine, unharmed might 
women eheat my godhead with lying lips. I myself 
would swear that womankind swore true, nor let 
myself be called a god of the austere sort. Yet 
you, my lady, make more measured use of their gift 
— or spare, at least, my eyes ! 6 



IV 

Hard husband, by setting a keeper over your 
tender wife von nothing gain ; 'tis her own nature 
must be eaeh woman's guard. If she is pure when 

6 By not swearing by them ; see v. 14. 

459 



OVID 



siqua metu dempto casta est, ea denique casta est ; 

quae, quia non liceat, non facit, ilia facit ! 
ut iani servaris bene corpus, adultera mens est ; 5 

nec custodiri, ne 1 velit, ulla 2 potest, 
nec corpus servare potes, licet omnia claudas ; 

omnibus exclusis inbus adulter erit. 
cui peccare licet, peccat minus ; ipsa potestas 

semina nequitiae languidiora facit. 10 
desine, crede mihi, vitia inritare vetando ; 

obsequio vinces aptius ilia tuo. 
Vidi ego nuper equum contra sua vincla tenacem 

ore rehictanti fulmims ire modo ; 
constitit ut primum concessas sensit habenas 15 

frenaque in effusa laxa iacere iuba ! 
nitimur in vetitum semper cupimusque negata ; 

sic interdictis imminet aeger aquis. 
centum fronte oculos, centum cervice gerebat 

Argus — et hos unus saepe fefellit Amor ; 20 
in thalamum Danae ferro saxoque perennem 

quae fuerat virgo tradita, mater erat ; 
Penelope mansit, quamvis custode carebat, 

inter tot iuvenes intemerata procos. 
Quidquid servatur cupimus magis, ipsaque furem 25 

cura vocat ; pauci, quod sinit alter, amant. 
nec facie placet ilia sua, sed amore mariti ; 

nescio quid, quod te ceperit, esse putant. 
non proba fit, quam vir servat, sed adultera cara ; 

ipse timor pretium corpore maius habet. 30 
indignere licet, iuvat inconcessa voluptas ; 

sola placet, "timeo!" dicere siqua potest. 
1 ne P: ni vulg. 2 ulla Ps : ilia vulg. 

460 



THE AMOKES 111. iv 



freed from every fear, then first is she pure ; she 
who sins not because she may not — she sins ! 
Grant you have guarded well the body, the mind 
is untrue ; and no watch can be set o'er a woman's 
will. Nor can yon guard her body, though you shut 
ever}' door; with all shut out, a traitor will be within. 
She to whom erring is free, errs less ; very power 
makes less quick the seeds of sin. Ah, trust to 
me, and cease to spur on to fault by forbidding ; 
indulgence will be the apter way to win. 

13 But recently I saw a horse rebellions against 
the curb take bit in his obstinate mouth and career 
like thunderbolt ; he stopped the very moment he 
felt the rein was given, and the lines were lying loose 
on his Hying mane ! We ever strive for what is 
forbid, and ever covet what is denied ; so the sick man 
longingly hangs over forbidden water. A hundred 
eyes before, a hundred behind, had Argus — and 
these Love alone did oft deceive ; the chamber of 
Danae was eternally strong with iron and rock, yet 
she who had been given a maid to its keeping be- 
came a mother. Penelope, although without a guard, 
remained inviolate among so many youthful wooers. 

- 5 Whatever is guarded we desire the more, and 
care itself invites the thief ; few love what another 
concedes. And that fair one of yours wins not 
because of her beauty, but because of her husband's 
love ;. something there is, they think, for you to 
be smitten with. She whom her husband guards 
is not made honest thereby, but a mistress much 
desired : fear itself gives her greater price than her 
charms. lie wrathful if you will, 'tis forbidden 
joys delight; she only charms whoe'er can say : c ' I 
fear!" And vet 'tis not right to watch a free-born 



461 



OVID 



nee tamen ingenuam ius est servare puellam — 

liic metus externae corpora gentis agat ! 
scilicet ut possit custos "ego" dicere "feci/' 

in laudem servi casta sit ilia tui ? 
Rusticus est nimiunv, quern lacdit adultei*a coniunx 

et notos mores non satis urbis habet 
in qua Martigenae non sunt sine crimine nati 

Romulus Iliades Iliadesque Remus, 
quo tibi formosam, si non nisi casta placebat ? 

non possunt ullis ista coire modis. 
Si sapiSj indulge dominae vultusque severos 

exue, nec rigidi iura tuere viri, 
et cole quos dederit — multos dabit — uxor amicos. 

gratia sic minimo magna labore venit ; 
sic poteris iuvenum convivia semper inire 

et, quae non dederis, multa videre domi. 

<• 

" Nox erat, et sonmus lassos submisit ocellos ; 

terruerunt animum talia visa meum : 
Colle sub aprico creberrimus ilice lucus 

stabat, et in ramis multa latebat avis, 
area gramineo subeivit viridissima prato, 

umida de guttis lene sonantis aquae, 
ipse sub arboreis vitabam frondibus aestum — 

fronde sub arborea sed tamen aestus erat — 
1 V ia not Ovid's, Merk. L. Mueller : it is in Ps. 

462 



The amoues hi. v 



wife — let this fear vex women of other blood than 
ours!" Is your wife, forsooth, to be chaste merely 
that her keeper may say : u I am the cause " — merely 
for the glory of your slave ? 

37 He is too countrified who is hurt when his wife 
plays false, and is but slightly acquaint with the 
maimers of the citv in which the sons of Mars were 
born not without reproach — Romulus, child of Ilia, 
and Ilia's child Remus. Why did you marry a 
beaut}* if none but a chaste would suit ? Those 
two things can never in any wise combine. 

43 If you are wise, indulge your lady ; put off 
stern looks and do not insist on the rights of a rigid 
husband, and cherish the friends your wife will 
bring — and she will bring many ! You will be in 
great favour thus, and with very little effort; thus 
will yon find yourself ever going to dine With 
the young, and at home see many presents not of 
your giving. 



V 

"TwftS night, and slumber weighed my weary 
eyelids down — when a vision terrified my soul. 
'Twas on this wise : 

3 "At the foot of a sunny hill was a grove thick- 
standing with ilex, and in its branches was hidden 
many a bird. Near by was a plot of deepest green, a 
grassy mead, humid with the tricklings of gently 
sounding water. I was seeking refuge from the 
heat beneath the branches of the trees — though 
beneath the trees' branches came none the less 

a Slaves and freed wo men. 



403 



OVID 



ecce ! petens variis inmixtas floribus herbas 

constitit ante oculos Candida vacca meos, 10 
candidior nivibus, tunc cum ceeidere recentes, 

in liquidas nondum quas mora vertit aquas ; 
eandidior, quod adhuc spumis stridentibus albet 

et modo siecatam, lacte, reliquit ovem. 
taurus erat comes hide, felieiter ille maritus, 15 

cumque sua teneram coniuge pressit humum. 
Dum iacet et lente revocatas ruminat herbas 

atque iterum pasto pascitur ante cibo, 
visus erat, somno vires adimente ferendi, 1 

cornigerum terra deposuisse caput. 20 
hue levibus comix pinnis delapsa per auras 

venit et in viridi garrula sedit humo, 
terque bovis niveae petulanti peetora rostro 

fodit et albentis abstulit oi*e iubas. 
ilia loeum taurumque diu cunctata relinquit — 25 

sed niger in vaecae peetore livor erat ; 
utque proeid vidit earpentes pabula tauros — 

earpebant tauri pabula laeta proeul — 
illuc se rapuit gregibusque inmiseuit illis 

et petiit herbae fertilioris humum. 30 
Die age, nocturnae, quicumque es, imaginis augur, 

siquid habent veri, visa quid ista ferant." 
Sic ego ; nocturnae sic dixit imaginis augur, 

expendens animo singula dicta suo : 
" Quern tu mobilibus foliis vitare volebas, 35 

sed male vitabas, aestus amoris erat. 

1 ferendi Bent.: ferenti Ps: feraci L. Mueller. 



THE AMORES III. v 



tlie heat — when lo ! coming to crop the herbage 
mingled with varied flowers there stood before my 
eyes a shining white heifer, more shining white 
than snows just freshly fallen and not yet turned 
by time to flowing waters ; more shining white 
than the milk that gleams with still hissing foam, 
and has just left the sheep drained dry. A bull was 
companion to her, a happy consort he, and pressed 
the tender ground beside his mate. 

17 "While he lay there, slowly chewing the grassy 
cud that rose again, and feeding a second time on 
what he had fed on before, in my vision I thought 
that sleep took away his power of holding up his 
head, and he laid its horned weight upon the earth. 
Thither, gliding down through the air, on pinions 
light, came a crow, and settled chattering on the 
verdant ground, and, peeking thriee with wanton 
beak at the breast of the snowy heifer, carried 
away in his mouth white tufts of hair. The heifer, 
lingering long, went away from the place and from 
the bull — but a darkly livid mark was on her 
breast ; and, seeing bulls afar cropping the pastur- 
age — there were bulls eropping the glad pasturage 
afar — she ran quickly thither and mingled with 
those herds, choosing the ground where the herbage 
was more lush. 

31 "Come, tell me, augur of visions by night, who- 
e'er thou art, what mean those things 1 saw, if 
aught they hide of truth." 

83 Thus 1 ; and thus spake the augur of visions 
by night, weighing in mind each single thing I 
said : 

35 "The heat you wished to shun beneath the 
fluttering leaves, and shunned but ill, was the heat 

465 

11 11 



OVID 



vacca puella tua est — aptus color ille puellae ; 

tu vir et in vacca conpare taurus eras, 
pectora quod rostro comix fodiebat acuto, 

ingenium dominae lena movebat anus. 40 
quod cunctata diu taurum sua vacca reliquit, 

frigidus in viduo destituere toro. 
iivor et adverso maculae sub pectore nigrae 

pectus adulterii labe carere negant." 
Dixerat interpres. gelido mihi sanguis ab ore 45 

fugit, et ante oculos nox stetit alta meos. 



VI 

Amnis harundinibus limosas obsite ripas, 

ad dominmn propero — siste parumper aquas ! 
nec tibi sunt pontes nec quae sine remigis ictu 

concava traiecto cumba rudente vehat. 
parvus eras, memini, nec te transire refugi, 5 

summaque vix talos contigit unda meos. 
nunc ruis adposito nivibus de monte solutis 

et turpi crassas gurgite vol vis aquas, 
quid properasse iuvat, quid parca dedisse quieti 

tempora, quid nocti conseruisse diem, 10 
si tamen hie standum est, si non datur artibus ullis 

ulterior nostro ripa premenda pedi ? 
nunc ego, quas habuit pinnas Danaeius heros, 

terribili densum cum tulit angue caput, 



THE AMORES J II. vi 



of love. The heifer Avas your, love — that colour 
matehes your love. You, her beloved, were the bull 
with the heifer for mate. The peeking of her 
breast by the crow's sharp beak meant a pandering 
old dame was meddling with your mistress' heart. 
The lingering long e'er the heifer left her bull 
was sign that you will be left cold in a desei'ted bed. 
The dark colour and the black spots on her breast 
in front were signs that her heart is not without 
stain of unfaithfulness." 

45 The interpreter had said. I was cold ; the 
blood fled from my face, and before my e} r es stood 
deep night. 

VI 

O stream whose muddy banks are choked with 
reeds, I am in haste to see my lady-love — stay for a 
little time thy waters ! Neither hast thou bridges, 
nor hollowed boat to carry me without stroke of 
oar by cable stretched across. Small wert thou, I 
remember, nor did I fear to cross, and thy highest 
water scarce touched my ankles. Now the snows 
have melted from the near-by mountain, and thou 
art rushing on, l'olling gross waters in muddy, 
whirling floods. What boots it I have hastened, what 
that I gave scant hours to rest, what that I have 
linked day to night, if I yet must stand here, if 
by no art I may press with my foot the farther 
shore? 'Tis now I wish I had the pinions the hero 
son of Danae wore when he bare away the head 
thiek-tressed with dreadful snakes;" now I wish 
a Perseus, slayer of the Medusa, with winged sandals. 

467 

H H 2 



OVID 



nunc opto currum, -de quo Cerealia prinmm 1 5 

semina venerunt in rude missa solum, 
prodigiosa loquor veterum mendacia vatura ; 

nec tulit haec umquam nec feret ulla dies. 
Tu potius, ripis effuse capacibus aninis — 

sic aeternus eas — Inhere fine tuo ! 20 
non eris invidiae, torrens, mihi crede, ferendae, 

si dicar per te forte retentus amans. 
flumina deberent iuvenes in amore iuvare ; 

flumina senserunt ipsa, quid esset amor. 
Inachus in Melie Bithynide pallidus isse 25 

dicitur et gelid is incaluisse vadis. 
nondum Troia fuit lustris obsessa duobus, 

cum rapuit vultus, Xanthe, Neaera tuos. 
quid ? non Alpheon diversis currere terris 

virginis Arcadiae certus adegit amor ? 30 
tc quoque promissam Xutho, Penee, Creusam 

Phthiotum terris oeculuisse ferunt. 
quid referam Asopon, quern eepit Martia Thebe, 

natarum Thebe quinque futura parens ? 
cornua si tua nunc ubi sint, Acheloe, requiram, 35 

Herculis irata fracta querere manu ; 
nec tanti Calydon nec tota Aetolia tanti, 

una tamen tanti Deianira fuit. 
ille fluens dives septena per ostia Nilus, 

qui patriam tantae tarn bene celat aquae, 40 
fertur in Euanthe collectam Asopide flammam 

vincere gurgitibus non potuisse suis. 
siccus ut amplecti Salmonida posset Enipeus, 

cedere iussit aquam ; iussa recessit aqua. 

The car was drawn through the air by serpents. 

468 



THE AM ORES III. vi 



that mine were the car from which first came the 
seeds of Ceres when cast on the untilled ground." 
But the wonders whereof I speak are false tales of 
olden bards ; no day e'er brought them forth, and 
no day will. 

19 Do thou choose rather, O stream poured wide 
beyond thy capacious banks — so inayst thou flow on 
for ever — to glide within thy bounds ! Thine, O 
torrent, will be hate unbearable, believe, if I per- 
chance am said to have been kept by thee — 1, a 
lover ! Rivers ought to aid young men in love ; what 
love is, rivers themselves have felt. The Inachus, 
they say, went pale for Bithynian Melie, and his 
ehill waves felt love's warmth. Not yet had Troy 
been under siege two lustrums when Neaera ravished 
thine eyes, O Xanthus. What ? did not Alpheus 
flow in far-separate lands, driven by faithful love 
for Arcadian maid ? b Thou, too, Peneus, they say 
didst hide away, in the land of the Phthiotes, 
Creusa, promised bride to Xuthus. Why call to 
mind Asopus, smitten with Thebe, child of Mars — 
Thebe, destined mother of daughters five? If I 
ask of thee, Achelous, where are now thy horns, 
thou wilt eomplain of their breaking by wrathful 
Hercules' hand ; what neither Calydon could win 
from him, nor all Aetolia, Deianira none the less 
alone could win. Rieh Nile yonder, who flows 
through seven mouths and hides so well the home- 
land of his mighty waters, 'tis said could not drown 
out with his own floods the fires Asopus' child 
Euanthe kindled in him. Enipeus, to dry himself 
for the arms of Salmoneus' child, bade his waters 
retire ; the waters, so bid, retired. 

* Avethusa was pursued from Elis to Sicily, under the sea. 

469 



OVID 



Nec te praetereo, qui per cava saxa volutans 1 45 

Tiburis Argei pomifera 2 arva rigas, 
Ilia cui placuit, quamvis erat horrida cultu, 

ungue notata comas, ungue notata genas. 
ilia gemens patruique nefas delictaque Martis 

errabat nudo per loca sola pede. 50 
hanc Anien rapidis animosiis vidit ab undis 

raucaque de mediis sustulit ora vadis 
atque ita " quid nostras " dixit "teris anxia ripas, 

Ilia, ab Idaeo Laumedonte genus ? 
quo cultus abiere tui ? quid sola vagaris, 55 

vitta nec evinctas inpedit alba comas ? 
quid fles et madidos lacrimis corrumpis ocellos 

pectoraque insana plangis aperta manu ? 
ille habet et silices et vivum in pectore ferrum, 

qui tenero lacrimas lentus in ore videt. 60 
Ilia, pone metus ! tibi regia nostra patebit, 

teque colent amnes. Ilia, pone metus ! 
tu centum aut plures inter dominabere nymphas ; 

nam centum aut plures flumina nostra tenent. 
ne me sperne, precor, tantum, Troiana 8 propago ; 65 

munera promissis uberiora feres." 
Dixerat. ilia oculos in humum deiecta modestos 

spargebat teneros flebilis imbre sinus, 
ter molita fugam ter ad altas restitit undas, 

currendi vires eripiente metu. 70 
sera tamen scindens inimico pollice criiiem 

edidit indignos ore tremente sonos : 

1 volutans vulg.: volutus s. 

2 pomifera Bent.: ponifer P s : spumifer vxdg. 

3 Romana P s. 

a Or Rhea Silvia, mother of Romulus and Remus. 

470 



THE AMORES III. vi 



45 Nor do I pass thee by, stream tumbling over 
the hollowed rocks and moisting the fruit-hearing 
acres of Argive Tibur, thee whom Ilia a charmed, ill 
kept though she appeared, with hair that showed 
the nail, and eheeks that showed the nail. Be- 
moaning the crime of her uncle and the wrongs of 
Mars, with unshod feet she wandered through lone 
places. Her did eager Anio behold, looking forth 
from his sweeping Hoods, and reared from amid 
the wave his hoarse-toned mouth, and " Why dost 
thou anxiously," thus spake he, " tread my shores, 
O Ilia, blood of Idaean Laomedon ? Whither hath 
gone thy comely raiment ? Why art abroad alone, 
with no white fillet to keep thy hair bound up ? 
Why art thou weeping, and staining thine eyes with 
dropping tears ? and why dost lay open and beat 
thy breast with maddened hand ? He hath both 
Hint and native iron in his breast who can look 
unmoved on the tears in thy tender eyes. Ilia, lay 
aside thy fears ! To thee my royal hall shall 
open, and thee my waves shall honour. Ilia, lay 
aside thy fears ! Thou shalt be mistress among a 
hundred nymphs, or more ; for a hundred, or more, 
are the nymphs that dwell in my stream. Only 
spurn me not, I entreat, thou sprung of the Trojan 
line ; thou shalt win gifts of greater richness than 
my promise." 

67 He had said. She stood with modest eyes 
downeast upon the ground, letting spray on her 
tender bosom a rain of tears. Thriee made she 
to Hee, and thrice stopped she beside the deep 
flood, her power of Hying swept away by fear. Yet, 
after long time, rending her hair with unfriendly 
finger, she sounded with trembling lips the words her 

47i 



OVID 



" o utinam mea lecta forent patrioque sepulcro 

condita, cum poterant virginis ossa legi ! 
cur, modo Vestalis, taedas invitor ad ullas 75 

turpis et Iliacis infitianda focis ? 
quid moror et digitis designor adultera vidgi ? 

desint famosus quae notet ora pudor ! " 
Hactenus, et vestem tumidis praetendit ocellis 

atque ita se in rapidas perdita misit aquas. 80 
supposuisse manus ad pectora lubricus amnis 

dicitur et socii iura dedisse tori. 
Te quoque credibile est aliqua caluisse puella ; 

sed nemora et silvae crimina vestra tegunt. 
dum loquor, increvit 1 latis spatiosior 2 undis, 85 

nec capit admissas alveus altus aquas, 
quid mecnm, furiose, tibi ? quid mutua differs 

gaudia ? quid coeptum, rustice, rumpis iter ? 
quid ? si legitimum flueres, si nobile fhimen, 

si tibi per terras maxima fama foret — 90 
nomen habes nullum, rivis collecte caducis, 

nec tibi sunt fontes nec tibi certa domus ! 
fontis habes instar pluviamque nivesqne solutas, 

quas tibi divitias pigra ministrat hiemps ; 
aut lutulentus agis brumali tempore cursus,, 95 

aut premis arentem pulverulentus humum. 
quis te turn potuit sitiens haurire viator ? 

quis dixit grata voce " perennis eas " ? 

1 increscis Ehw. 

2 spatiosior Bent.: spatiosus iuPs: spatiosius Merk. from 
Mar. MS. 



° Vesta's fires, brought by Aeneas from Troy. 

472 



THE AMORES III. vi 



wrongs called forth : " Oh, would that my bones had 
been gathered and laid away in the tomb of my 
fathers when they yet could be gathered the bones 
of a maid ! Why, but now a Vestal, am I bid to 
any marriage-torch, disgraced and to be denied my 
place at Ilion's altar-fires ? a Why tarry I alive to 
be pointed out a jade by the finger of the crowd ? 
Perish the face that bears the brand of shame and 
disrespect ! " 

79 Thus far, and she held her cloak before her 
tumid eyes, gave up all hope, and so threw herself 
into the rushing waters. The smooth-gliding stream, 
they say, laid his hands to her breast and bore her 
up, and shared with her the rights of the wedded 
couch. 

83 Thou, too, 'tis easy to believe, hast warmed 
for some fair maid ; but grove and forest cover 
up thy fault. Even while I speak, thy waters have 
grown more deep and wide, and thy channel, though 
deep, contains not the headlong waves. What have 
I with thee, mad stream ? Why dost thou defer 
the joys 1 am to share ? Why dost thou, churl, 
break off the journey I have begun ? What ? wert 
thou called rightly stream, wert thou a river of 
name, were thine greatest fame o'er all the earth — 
but thou hast no name, thou art but gathered 
from failing rivulets, and hast neither fountain-source 
nor fixed abode ! In place of source thou hast only 
the rain and the melted snows, riches that sluggish 
winter serves to thee ; either thou runnest a 
muddy course in the brumal time, or hast a dried 
and dusty bed. What thirsty fafer has e'er been 
able then to drink of thee ? Who in grateful tone 
has said of thee : " Mayst thou flow on for ever ? " 



473 



OVID 



damnosus pecori curris, damnosior agris. 

forsitan haec alios ; me mea damna movent. 100 
Huic egOj vae ! demens narrabam fluminum amores ! 

iactasse indigne nomina tanta pudet. 
nescio quern hunc spectans Acheloon et Inachon 
amnem 

et potui noraen, Nile, referre tuum ! 
at tibi pro meritiSj opto, non candide torrens, 105 
sint rapidi soles siccaque semper hiemps ! 



Villi 

Et quisquam ingenuas etiamnunc suspicit artes, 

ant tenerum dotes carmen habere putat? 
ingenium quondam fuerat pretiosius auro ; 

at nunc barbaria est grandis, habere nihil, 
cum pulchrae dominae nostri placuere libelli, 5 

quo licuit libris, non licet ire mihi ; 
cum bene laudavit, laudato ianua clausa est. 

turpiter hue illuc ingeniosus eo. 
Ecce, recens dives parto per vulnera censu 

praefertur nobis sanguine pastus eques ! 10 
hunc potes amplecti formosis, vita, lacertis ? 

huius in amplexu, vita, iacere potes ? 
si nesciSj caput hoc galeam portare solebat ; 

ense latus cinctum, quod tibi servit, erat ; 
1 For VII see p. 506. 



a The soldier had recently been enrolled an eques. Ovid's 
474 



THE AMORES III. viii 



Thou art a current harmful to the flocks, more 
harmful to the fields. These wrongs perhaps touch 
others ; me my own wrongs touch. 

101 To a stream like this — out upon it ! — I was 
fool enough to tell of the loves of rivers ! I shame 
to have uttered unworthily names so great. To 
think that,- looking on this nothing of a stream, I 
could mention your names, Achelous and luachus, 
and thine, O Nile ! Indeed, for thee, as thou 
deservest, O torrent aught but clear, I pray that 
suns be ever fierce and winter ever dry ! 



VIII 

And does anyone still respect the freeborn arts, 
or deem tender verse brings any dower ? Time was 
when genius was more precious than gold ; but now 
to have nothing is monstrous barbarism. When my 
little books have won my lady, where my books 
could go, I may not go myself; when she has praised 
me heartily, to him she has praised the door is closed. 
Disgracefully hither and thither I go, for all my 
poet's gift. 

9 Look you, a newly-rich, a knight a fed fat on 
blood, who won his rating bv dealing wounds, is 
preferred to me ! A being like that can you, my life, 
embrace with your beautiful arms ? In such a one's 
embrace, my life, can you let yourself be clasped ? If 
you do not know, that head used to wear a helmet ; 
a sword was girt to the side that now serves you ; 

own family had the same rank, but it was of long 
standing. Birth or the possession of about £3,200 deter- 
mined it. 

475 



OVID 



laeva manus, cui nunc serum male convenit 

aurum, 1 5 

scuta tulit ; dextram tange — cruenta fuit ! 
qua periit aliquis, potes hanc contingere dextram ? 

heu, ubi mollities pectoris ilia tui ? 
cerne cicatrices, veteris vestigia pugnae — 

quaesitum est illi eorpore, quidquid habet. 20 
forsitan et, quotiens hominem iugulaverit, ille 

indicet ! hoc fassas tangis, avara, manus ? 
ille ego Musarum purus Phoebique sacerdos 

ad rigidas canto carmen inane fores ? 
discite, qui sapitis, non quae nos scimus inertes, 25 

sed trepidas acies et fera castra sequi 
proque bono versu primum deducite pilum ! 

hoc tibi, si velles, posset, Homere, dari. 
Iuppiter, admonitus nihil esse potentius auro, 

corruptae pretium virginis ipse fuit. 30 
dum merces aberat, durus pater, ipsa severa, 

aerati postes, ferrea turris erat ; 
sed postquam sapiens in munera venit adulter, 

praebuit ipsa sinus et dare iussa dedit. 
at cum regna senex caeli Saturnus haberet, 35 

omne lucrum tenebris alta premebat humus, 
aeraque et argentum cumque auro pondera ferri 

manibus admorat, nullaque massa fuit. 
at meliora dabat — curvo sine vomere fruges 

pomaque et in qucrcu mella reperta cava. 40 



a The badge of an eques. * Danae. 

476 



THE AMORES HI. viii 



that left hand, which now the late-gotten gold 
ring so ill becomes/' has carried a shield ; that 
right hand — touch it ! — has been stained with blood. 
The hand by which someone has died — ean you 
touch that right hand ? Alas ! where is the ten- 
derness of heart you had ? Look at those sears, 
marks of the bygone fight — that man has earned 
with his body whatever he has. Perhaps he could 
even tell you how many times he has plunged the 
steel in a human throat. Do you toueh, greedy 
girl, hands that tell such tales ? and do I, the 
unstained priest of Phoebus and the Muses, sing 
verses all in vain before your unyielding doors ? 
Ah, ye who are wise, learn not what we know, we 
sluggards, but to follow battle's alarms and the 
fierce tented field, and marshall, in place of good 
verse, the foremost spears ! This, Homer, had been 
thy fortune, didst thou wish. 

29 Jove, knowing well that naught was more 
potent than gold, himself became the price of a 
maid's betrayal. 6 So long as there was no gain to 
get, hard was the father, the maid herself severe, 
brazen the door, and iron the tower ; yet when 
the astute lover had come in the form of a price, 
the maid herself opened her arms and gave her 
favours at command. But when ancient Saturn had 
his kingdom in the sky, the deep earth held lucre 
all in its dark embrace. Copper and silver and gold 
and heavy iron he had hid away in the lower realms, 
and there was no massy metal. Yet better were 
his gifts — inerease without the curved share, and 
fruits and honeys brought to light from the hollow 
oak. And no one broke the glebe with the strong 
share, no measurer marked the limit of the soil, 



477 



OVID 



nec valido quisquam terrain scindebat 1 aratro, 

signabat nullo limite mensor humum, 
non freta demisso verrebant eruta remo ; 

ultima mortali turn via litus erat. 
Contra te sollers, honiinum natura, fuisti 45 

et nimium damnis ingeniosa tuis. 
quo tibij turritis incingere moenibus urbes ? 

quo tibi, discordes addere in arma manus ? 
quid tibi cum pelago — terra contenta fuisses ! 

cur non et caelum, tertia regna, petis ? 50 
qua licet, adfectas caelum quoque — templa 
Quirinus, 

Liber et Alcides et modo Caesar babent. 
eruimus terra solidum pro frugibus aurum. 

possidet inventas sanguine miles opes, 
curia pauperibus clausa est — dat census honores ; 55 

inde gravis iudex, inde severus eques ! 
Omnia possideant ; illis Campusque forumque 

serviat, hi pacem crudaque bella gerant — 
tantum ne nostros avidi liceantur amores, 

et — satis est — aliquid pauperis esse sinant ! 60 
at mine, exaequet tetricas licet ilia Sabinas, 

imperat ut captae qui dare multa potest ; 
me prohibet custos, in me timet ilia maritum. 

si dederim, tota cedet uterque domo ! 
o si neclecti quisquam deus ultor amantis G5 

tarn male quaesitas pnlvere mutet opes ! 

1 findebat vulg. 



473 



THE AMORES III. viii 



they did not sweep the seas, stirring the waters with 
dipping oar ; the shore in those days was the utmost 
path for man. 

45 Thine own genius, O human kind, hath been 
thy foe, and thy wit o'er great to thine own undoing. 
What boots it thee to girdle eities with towered walls ? 
What bouts it to plaee the weapon in hands at 
strife ? What was the sea to thee — with the land 
thou shouldst have been content ! Why dost not 
aspire to the skies, too, for a third dominion ? 
Where thou mayst, thou dost pretend to the skies 
as well — Quirinus has his temple, and Liber, and 
Alcides, and Caesar now. We draw from the earth, 
instead of increase, the massy gold. The soldier 
possesses wealth begotten of his blood. The senate 
is closed to the poor — 'tis rating brings office ; 'tis 
that gives the juror weight, 'tis ■ that makes a 
pattern of the knight ! 

57 Let them have all ; let these have Campus and 
Forum slaves to them, and those rule the issues 
of peace and bloody war — only let them not in 
their greed buy away our loves, and let them leave 
something — 'tis enough — for the poor to win ! 
But now, though she I love match the austere 
Sabine dames, he who has mueh to give commands 
her as if a eaptive ; while I — am denied by her 
guard ; when it eomes to me, she fears her husband. 
If I chanee to have given, both guard and husband 
will leave me the whole house free ! O were there 
only some god to avenge the neglected lover, and 
change to dust gains so ill-got. 



479 



OVID 



IX 

Memnona si mater, mater ploravit Acliillem, 

et tangunt magnas tristia fata deas, 
flebilis indignos, Elegeia, solve capillos ! 

a, nimis ex vero nunc tibi nomen erit ! — 
ille tui vates operis, tna fama, Tibullus 5 

ardet in extructo, corpus inane, rogo. 
ecce, puer Veneris fert eversamque pharetram 

et fractos arcus et sine luce facem ; 
adspice, demissis ut eat miserabilis alis 

pectoraque infesta tundat aperta manu ! 10 
excipiunt lacrimas sparsi per colla capilli, 

oraque singultu concutiente sonant, 
fratris in Aeneae sic ilium fun ere dicunt 

egressum tectis, pulcher lule, tuis ; 
nec minus est confusa Venus moriente Tibullo, 15 

quam iuveni rupit cum ferus inguen aper. 
at sacri vates et divum cura vocamur ; 

sunt etiam qui nos numen habere putent. 
Scilicet orane sacrum mors inportuna profanat, 

omnibus obscuras illicit ilia maims ! 20 
quid pater lsmario, quid mater profuit Orpheo ? 

carmine quid victas obstipuisse feras ? 
et Linon 1 in silvis idem pater " aelinon ! " altis 

djcitur in vita concinuisse lyra. 
M adice Maeoniden, a quo ceu fonte perenni 25 

vatum Pieriis ora rigantur aquis — 

1 So Ehw.: aelinon — aelinon vuly. 

a Apollo and the Muse Calliope. 

b "Woe, Linus," a dirge. e Homer. 



480 



THE AMORES 111. ix 



IX 

If Meranon was bewailed by his mother, if a 
mother bewailed Achilles, and if sad fates are 
touching to great goddesses, be thou in tears, 
O Elegy, and loose thine undeserving hair ! Ah, 
all too truthful now will be thy name ! — he, that 
singer of thy strain, that glory of thine, Tibullus, 
lies burning on the high-reared pyre, an empty 
mortal frame. See, the child of Venus comes, with 
quiver reversed, with bows broken, and lightless 
torch ; look, how pitiable he comes, with drooping 
wings, how he beats his bared breast with hostile 
hand! His tears are caught by the locks hanging 
scattered about his neck, and from his lips comes 
the sound of shaking sobs. In such plight, they 
say, he was at Aeneas his brother's laying away, 
when he came forth of thy dwelling, fair lulus ; nor 
was Venus' heart less wrought when Tibullus died 
than when the fierce boar crushed the groin of the 
youth she loved. Yes, we bards are called sacred, 
and the care of the gods ; there are those who even 
think we have the god within. 

19 Too true it is, death rudely profaneth every 
sacred thing, and layeth darksome hands on all ! 
Of what avail to Ismarian Orpheus was his sire, of 
what avail his mother?" Of what that the wild 
beast stopped in amaze, o'ermastercd by his song? 
The same sire, 'tis said, mourned Linus, too, singing 
"aelinon ! " b in the deep wood to unresponsive lyre. 
Add to these Maeonia's child," from whom as from 
fount perennial the lips of bards are bedewed with 
Pierian waters — him, too, a final day submerged in 

481 

1 1 



OVID 



hunc quoqne summa dies nigro submersit Averno. 

defugiunt 1 avidos carmina sola rogos ; 
durat opus vatum, Troiani fama laboris 

tardaque nocturno tela retexta dolo. 30 
sic Nemesis longum, sic Delia noraen habebunt, 

altera cura recens, altera primus amor. 
Quid vos sacra iuvant ? quid nunc Aegyptia prosunt 

sistra ? quid in vacuo secubuisse toro ? 
cum rapiunt mala fata bonos — ignoscite fasso ! — 35 

sollicitor nullos esse putare deos. 
vive pius — moriere ; pius cole sacra — eolentem 

mors gravis a templis in cava busta trail et ; 
carminibus confide bonis — iaeet, ecce, Tibullus : 

vix manet e toto, parva quod urn a capit ! 40 
tene, saeer vates, flammae rapuere rogales 

pectoribus pasci nee timuere tuis ? 
aurea sanctorum potuissent templa deorum 

urere, quae tantum sustinuere nefas ! 
avertit vultus, Erycis quae possidet arce"s ; 45 

sunt quoque, qui lacrimas continuisse negant. 
Sed tamen hoc melius, quam si Phaeacia tellus 

ignotum vili supposuisset humo. 
hinc certe madidos fugientis pressit ocellos 

mater et in cineres ultima dona tulit ; 50 
hinc soror in partem misera cum matre doloris 

venit inomatas dilaniata comas, 

1 defugiunt /. C. Jahn from tivo 3ISS.: diffugiunt vulg. 

a Tibullus, in i. 3, 23-26, refers to Delia's devotion to Isis. 
The sistrum was an Egyptian musical instrument used in her 
worship. 

482 



THE AM ORES III. ix 



black Avernus. 'Tis song alone escapes the greedy 
pyre. The work of bards — the renown of tlie toils 
of Troy, and the tardy web unwoven with nightly 
wile — endures for aye. So Nemesis, so Delia, will 
long be known to fame, the one* a recent passion, 
the other his first love. 

33 What boot your sacrifices ? What now avail 
the sistrums of Egypt ? a What your repose apart in 
faithful beds ? When evil fate sweeps away the 
good — forgive me who say it ! — I am tempted to 
think there are no gods. Live the duteous life— 
you will die ; be faithful in your worship — in the 
very act of worship heavy death will drag you from 
the temple to the hollow tomb ; put your trust in 
beautiful song — behold, Tibullus lies dead : from 
his whole self there scarce remains what the slight 
urn receives ! Is it really thee, thou consecrated 
bard, whom the flames of the pyre have seized, 
and is it thy breast they have not feared to feed 
upon ? Flames that shrank not from such awful 
wrong could have burned the golden temples of the 
blessed gods ! She turned her face away who holds 
the heights of Eryx ; some, too, there are who say 
she kept not back the tear. 

47 And yet, 'tis better so than if Phaeacian land 6 
had laid mean soil o'er thy nameless corse. To 
this 'tis due that at least thy mother closed thy 
swimming eyes as thou didst pass from life, and 
bestowed on thy ashes the final boon ; to this 'tis due 
that thy sister came, with hair disordered and torn, 
to share the poor mother's grief, and Nemesis, and 

6 Corcyra, where Tibullus had once been dangerously ill. 
In i. 3, 3-10, composed at the time, he prays to be spared 
from death away from his mother, sister, and Delia. 

483 



OVID 



eumque tuis sua iunxerunt Nemesisque priorque 

oscula nec solos destituere rogos. 
Delia descendens "felicius" inquit "amata 

sum tibi ; vixisti, dum tuns ignis eram." 
cui Nemesis "quid" ait "tibi sunt mea damna 
dolori ? 

me tenuit moriens deficiente manu." 
Si tamen e nobis aliquid nisi nomen et umbra 

restat, in Elysia valle Tibullus erit. 
obvius huic venias hedera iuvenalia cinctus 

tempora cum Calvo, docte Catulle, tuo ; 
tu quoque, si falsum est temerati crimen amici, 

sanguinis atque animae prodige Galle tuae, 
his comes umbra tua est ; siqua est modo corporis 
umbraj 

auxisti numeroSj culte Tibulle, pios. 
ossa quieta, precor, tuta requiescite in urna^ 
et sit humus cineri non onerosa tuo ! 

X 

Annua venerunt Cerealis tempora sacri ; 

secubat in vacuo sola puella toi*o. 
flava Ceres, tenues spicis redimita capillos, 

cur inhibes sacris commoda nostra tuis ? 
Te, dea, munificam gentes ubiquaque loquuntur, 

nec minus humanis invidet ulla bonis, 
ante nec hirsuti torrebant farra colonic 

nec notum terris area nomen erat, 



484 



THE AMORES III. x 



her thou lovedst before, added their kisses to those 
from thine own kin, and left not desolate thy pyre. 
" More happily," spake Delia, descending from the 
pyre, " was I beloved by thee ; thou wert living as 
long as I kindled thee." To whom Nemesis, " Why," 
said she, "do you mourn for a loss which is mine? 
'Twas I to whom he clung when his hand failed 
in death." 

59 Yet, if aught survives from us beyond mere 
name and shade, in the vale of Elysium Tibullus will 
abide. Mayst thou come to meet him, thy youthful 
temples encircled with the ivy, and thy Calvus with 
thee, learned Catullus ; thou too, if the charge be 
false thou didst wrong thy friend, O Gallus lavish of 
thy blood and of thy soul. To these is thy shade 
comrade ; if shade there be that survives the body, 
thou hast increased the number of the blest, re- 
fined Tibullus. O bones, rest quiet in protecting 
urn, 1 pray, and mav the earth weigh light upon 
thine ashes ! 

X 

The time for Ceres' yearly festival is come ; my 
love is-in retreat, and rests alone." O golden Ceres, 
thy delieate tresses crowned with ears of wheat, why 
dost thou with thy festival put ban upon our joys ? 

5 Thee, goddess, do people everywhere call giver 
of gifts, nor is there goddess less envies men their 
blessings. Before thee, neither did shaggy country- 
man parch the corn, nor known upon the earth 
was the name of threshing-floor, but the oak, first 

" The festival was in August, and accompanied by fasting 
and other abstinence. 

485 



OVID 



seel glandem quercus, oracula prima, ferebant ; 

liaec erat et teneri caespitis herba cibus. 10 
prima Ceres docuit turgescere semen in agris 

falce coloratas subseeuitque comas ; 
prima iugis tauros snpponere colla coegit, 

et veterem enrvo dente revellit humum. 
Hanc qnisquiim laerimis laetari credit amantum 15 

et bene tormentis secubituque coli ? 
nec tamen est, quamvis agros amet ilia ferae.es, 

rustica nec vidunm pectus amoris habet. 
Cretes erunt testes — nec fingunt omnia Cretes. 

Crete nutrito terra superba love. 20 
illic, sideream mundi qui temperat arcem, 

exignus tenero lac bibit ore puer. 
Magna fides testi : testis laudatur alumno. 

fassuram Cererem crimina iiostra pnto. 
viderat Iasium Cretaea diva sub Ida 25 

figentem certa terga ferina manu. 
vidit, et ut tenerae flammam rapuere medullae, 

hinc pudor, ex ilia parte trahebat amor, 
victus amore pudor ; sulcos arere videres 

et sata cum minima parte redire sui. 30 
cum bene iactati pulsarant arva ligones, 

ru]>erat et duram vomer aduncus humum, 
seminaque in latos ierant aequaliter agros, 

inrita decepti vota colentis erant. 
diva potens frugum silvis cessabat in altis ; 35 

deciderant longae spicea serta comae, 
sola fuit Crete fecundo fertilis anno ; 

omnia, qua tulerat se dea, messis erat ; 

a At the primeval shrine of Jove at I )o<lona were oaks whose 
rustling was oracular. * Cf. Titus, i. 12, K^TjTes ael tyeuarat, 

486 



THE AMORES 111. x 



of our oracles,* brought forth the acorn ; this, and 
the herb that sprang- from the tender turf, were his 
food. 'Twas Ceres first taught the seed to swell 
in the fields, and cut with sickle the coloured locks 
of the corn ; 'twas she first made the steer bend 
neck to the yoke, and turned with the share's curved 
tooth the ancient mould. 

15 Does any think this a goddess to joy in the 
tears of lovers, and to see fit worship in the torments 
of lying apart ? However much she loves her fruitful 
fields, she is yet no simple rustic, nor has heart void 
of love. The Cretans will be my witness — and the 
Cretans are not wholly false. 6 Crete is the land 
proud of the nurture of Jove. 'Twas there that he 
who sways the starry heights of the world drank 
in the milk with the tender mouth of a little child. 

23 We have great faith in their witness — witness 
approved by their foster-son. Ceres herself, I think, 
will own to my impeachment. Under Cretan Ida 
the goddess had seen lasius with sure hand piercing 
the wild beast's side. She looked on him, and when 
her tender heart had caught the fire, she was victim 
now of shame, and now again of love. Her shame 
was overcome by love ; you might see the furrows 
of the field grown dry and the sown grain return- 
ing with seantest part of itself. When the well- 
wielded mattock had wrought upon the acre, and 
the hooked share had broken the dour glebe, and 
the seed had gone forth* equal over the broad 
plowed fields, the deluded husbandman had vowed 
in vain. The goddess potent over increase dallied 
in the dee]) woods ; fallen from her long tresses 
were the woven spikes of corn. Crete only was 
fruitful with fecund year ; wherever the goddess 

487 



OVID 



ipse 1 locus lienioninij canebat frugibus Ide, 2 

et ferns in silva farra metebat aper. 40 
optavit Minos similes sibi legifer annos, 

optavit, Cereris longus ut esset amor. 
Quod tibi secubitus tristes, dea flava, fuissent, 

hoc cogor sacris nunc ego ferre tuis ? 
cur ego sim tristis, cum sit tibi nata reperta 45 

regnaque quam Iuno sorte minore regat ? 
festa dies Veneremque vocat cantusque merumque ; 

haec decet ad dominos munera ferre deos. 

XI a 

Multa diuque tuli ; vitiis patientia victa est ; 

cede fatigato pectore, turpis amor ! 
scilicet adserui iam me fugique catenas, 

et quae non puduit ferre, tnlisse pudet. 
vicimus et domitum pedibus calcamus amorem ; 5 

venerunt capiti cornua sera meo. 
perfer et obdura ! 3 dolor hie tibi proderit olim ; 

saepe tulit lassis sucus amarus opem. 
Ergo ego sustinui, foribus tarn saepe repulsus, 

ingenuum dura ponerS corpus humo ? 10 
ergo ego nescio cui, quern tu conplexa tenebas, 

excubui clausam servus ut ante domum ? 

1 ipsa Ntm. 2 Ide vulgr. Idae P. 
3 So vidg.: perferre obdura, P x Merk. 

488 



THE AMORES III. xi 



had bent her step, all was rich with the garner ; t 
Ida, the very home of forests, was white with 
harvest, and the wild boar reaped the grain in the 
woodland. Minos, giver of laws, wished for seasons 
ever like this, wished that Ceres' love might long 
endure. 

43 Because tying apart was sad for thee, O golden 
Goddess, must I now suffer thus on thy holy day ? 
Why must I be sad, when for thee thy daughter 
is found,' 1 and reigns o'er realms of lesser state than 
only Juno's ? A festal day calls for love, and songs, 
and wine ; these are the gifts that are fitly tendered 
the gods our masters. 

XI a 

Much have I endured, and for long time ; my 
wrongs have overcome my patience ; withdraw from 
my tired-out breast, base love ! Surely, now I 
have claimed my freedom, and fled my fetters, 
ashamed of having borne what I felt no shame while 
bearing. Victory is mine, and I tread under foot my 
conquered love ; courage has entered my heart, 
though late. Persist, and endure ! this smart will 
some day bring thee good ; oft has bitter potion 
brought help to the languishing. 

9 Can it be I" have endured it — to be so oft 
repulsed from your doors, and to lay my body down, 
a free born man, on the hard ground ? Can it be 
that, for some no one you held in your embrace, 
I have lain, like a slave keeping vigil, before your 
tight-closed home ? I have seen when the lover 
" Proserpina. 

489 



OVID 



vidi, cum foribus lassus prodiret amator, 

invalidum referens emeritumque latus ; 
hoc tamen est levins, quam quod sum visus ab 
illo— 15' 

eveniat nostris hostibus ille pudor ! 
Quando ego non fixus lateri patienter adhaesi, 

ipse tuus custos, ipse vir, ipse comes ? 
scilicet et populo per me comitata 1 placebas ; 

causa fuit multis noster amoris amor. 20 
turpia quid referam vanae mendacia linguae 

et periuratos in mea damna deos ? 
quid iuvenum tacitos inter convivia nutus 

verbaque eonpositis dissimulata notis ? 
dicta erat aegra mihi — praeccps amensque cucurri ; 25 

veni, et rivali non erat aegra meo ! 
His et quae taceo duravi saepe ferendis ; 

quaere alium pro me, qui queat ista pati. 
iam mea votiva puppis redimita corona 

lenta tumescentes aequoris audit aquas. 30 
desine blanditias et verba, potentia quondam, 

perdere — non ego sum stultus, ut ante fui ! 2 

b 

Luctantur pectusque leve in contraria tendunt 
hac amor hac odium, sed, j)uto, vincit amor. 

odero, si potero ; si non, invitus amabo. 35 
nec iuga taurus a mat ; quae tamen odit, liabet. 

nequitiam fugio — fugientem forma reducit ; 
aversor morum crimina — corpus amo. 

1 comitata P: cantata Burnt , from Frcuicf. M,S. 

2 Mueller makes the division. 

49° 



THE AMORES III. xi 



came forth from your doors fatigued, with frame 
exhausted and weak from love's campaign ; yet this 
is a slighter thing than being seen by him — may 
shame like that befall my enemies ! 

17 When have I not in patience clung close to your 
side, myself your guard, myself your lover, myself 
your companion ? Be sure, too, that people liked 
you because you were at my side ; my love for you 
has won you love from many. Why repeat the 
shameful lies of your empty tongue, and recall the 
perjured oaths to the gods you have sworn to my 
undoing ? Why tell of the silent nods of young 
lovers at the banquet board, and of words eoneealed 
in the signal agreed upon ? Say I had been told she 
was ill — headlong and madly I ran to her ; I came, 
and she was not ill — to my rival ! 

27 Oft bearing such-like things, and others I say 
naught of, I have hardened ; seek another in my 
stead who can submit to them. Already my eraft 
is decked with votive wreath, and listens undisturbed 
to the sea's swelling waters. Cease wasting your 
earesses, and the words that once had weight — I am 
not a fool, as once I was ! 

b 

Struggling over my tickle heart, love draws it now 
this way, and now hate that — but love, I think, is 
winning. I will hate, if I have strength ; if not, 
I shall love unwilling. The ox, too, loves not the 
yoke ; what he hates he none the less bears. I fly 
from your baseness — as I fly, your beauty draws me 
back ; I shun the wickedness of your ways — your 

491 



OVID 



sic ego nec sine te nec tecum vivere possum, 

et videor voti nescius esse mei. 
aut formosa fores minus, aut minus inproba, vellen 

non facit ad mores tarn bona forma malos. 
facta merent odium, faeies exorat amorcm — 

me miserum, vitiis plus valet ilia suis ! 
Parce, per o lecti socialia iura, per omnis 

qui dant fallendos se tibi saepe deos, 
perque tuam faciem, magni mihi numinis instar, 

perque tuos oculos, qui rapuere meos ! 
quidquid eris, mea semper eris ; tu selige tantum, 

me quoque velle velis, anne coactus amem ! 
lintea dem potius ventisque ferentibus utar, 

ut, 1 quamvis nolim, cogar amare velim. 



XII 

Quis fuit ille dies, quo tristia semper amanti 

omina non albae concinuistis aves ? 
quodve putem sidus nostris occurrere fatis, 

quosve deos in me bella movere querar ? 
quae modo dicta mea est, quam coepi solus amare, 

cum multis vereor ne sit habenda mihi. 
Fallimur, an nostris innotuit ilia libellis ? 

sic erit — ingenio prostitit ilia raeo. 
et merito ! quid enim formae praeconia feci ? 

vendibilis culpa facta puella mea est. 

1 ut MSS.: quam Bautenbery. 



THE AMORES III. xii 



person I love. Tims I can live neither with you 
nor without, and seem not to know my own heart's 
prayer. I would you were either less beauteous or 
less base ; beauty so fair mates not with evil ways. 
Your actions merit hate, your face pleads winningly 
for love — ah ! wretched me, it has more power than 
its owner's misdeeds. 

45 Spare me, O by the laws of love's comradeship, 
by all the gods who oft lend themselves for you to 
deceive, and bv that face of yours, to me the image 
of high divinity, and by your eyes, that have taken 
captive mine ! Whatever you be, mine ever will 
you be ; choose you only whether you wish me also 
willing, or to love because constrained ! Let me 
rather spread my sails and use the favouring breeze, 
that I may wish, though against my will, for love's 
constraint. 



XII 

What day was that, ye birds not white, on which 
you chanted omens ill-boding to the poet ever in 
love ? or what ill star shall I think is rising on my 
fate, or what gods shall I complain are moving war 
against me ? She who but now was called my own, 
whom I began alone to love, must now, I fear, be 
shared with many. 

7 Am I mistaken, or is it my books of verse 
have made her known ? So will it prove — 'tis my 
genius has made her common. And I deserve it ! 
for why was I the crier of her beauty ? Through 
my fault she I love has become a thing of sale. I 



493 



OVID 



me lenone placet, duce me perductus amator, 

iamia per nostras est adaperta maims. 
An prosint, dubium, nocuerunt carmina semper ; 

invidiae nostris ilia fuere bonis, 
cum Thebe, cum Troia foret, cum Caesaris acta, 15 

ingenium movit sola Corinna raeuni. 
aversis utinam tetigissem carmina Musis, 

Phoebus et inceptum destituisset opus ! 
Nec tamen ut testes mos est audire poetas ; 

malueram verbis pondus abesse meis. 20 
per nos Scylla patri caros furata capillos 

pube ])remit rapidos 1 inguinibusque canes; 
nos pedibus pinnas dedimus, nos crinibus angues ; 

victor Abantiades alite fertur equo. 
idem j)er spatium Tityon porreximus ingens, 25 

et tria vipereo fecimus ora cani ; 
f'ecimus Enceladon iaculantem mille lacertis, 

ambiguae captos virginis ore viros. 
Aeolios Ithacis inclusimus utribus Euros ; 

proditor in medio Tantalus amne sitit. 30 
de Niobe silicem, de virgine fecimus ursam. 

concinit Odrysium Cecropis ales Ityn ; 
Iuppiter aut in aves aut se transformat in aurum 

aut secat inposita virgine taurus aquas. 
Protea quid referam Thebanaque semina, dentes ; 35 

qui vomerent Mammas ore, fuisse boves ; 

1 rabidos vulg.; rapidos P. 

a Scylla, daughter of Nisus, king of Megara, took from her 
father's head the purple lock on which his life depended, 
and was afterward changed to the monster. 

b Perseus and Mercury ; Medusa ; Perseus, Pegasus, and 
Andromeda. 



494 



THE AMORES III. xii 



am the pander has helped her to please, I have been 
guide to lead the lover, by my hand has her door 
been opened. 

13 Whether verses are good for aught, I doubt; 
they have always been my bane, and stood in the 
light of my good. Though there was Thebes, though 
Troy, though Caesar's deeds, Corinna only has stirred 
my genius. Would that the Muses had looked away 
when I first touched verse, and Phoebus refused me 
aid when my attempt was new ! 

19 And yet 'tis not the custom to heed the poet's 
witness ; my verses, too, I had preferred should 
have no weight. 'Twas we poets made Scylla steal 
from her sire a his treasured locks, and hide in her 
groin the devouring dogs ; 'tis we have placed wings 
on feet, and mingled snakes with hair ; our song 
made Abas' child a victor with the winged horse. 6 
We, too, stretched Tit} r os out through a mighty 
space, and gave to the viperous dog three mouths; 
we made Enceladus, hurling the spear with a thousand 
arms, and the heroes snared by the voice of the 
doubtful maid. c We shut in the skins of the Ithacan 
the East-winds of Aeolus ; made the traitor Tantalus 
thirst in the midst of the stream. Of Niobe we made 
a rock, and turned a maiden to a bear. d 'Tis due to 
us that the bird of Cecrops e sings Odrysian Itys ; 
that Jove transforms himself now to a bird, and now 
to gold, or cleaves the waters a bull with a maiden 
on his back. Why tell of Proteus, and those Theban 
seeds, the dragon's teeth ; that cattle once there 
were that spewed forth flames from their mouths ; 

c The Sirens. 

d Callisto, transformed by Juno and placed in the sky by 
Jove as Ursa Major. ' Philomela, the nightingale. 



495 



OVID 



flere genis electra tuas, Amiga, sorores ; 

quaeque rates fuerint, nunc maris esse deas ; 
aversumque diem mensis furialibus Atrei, 

duraque percussam saxa secuta lyram ? 40 
Exit in imnensum fecunda licentia vatimij 

obligat historica nec sua verba fide, 
et mea debuerat falso laudata videri 

femina ; eredulitas nunc mihi vestra nocet. 

XIII 

Cum mihi pomiferis coniunx foret orta Faliscis, 

moenia contigimus victa, Camille, tibi. 
casta sacerdotes Iunoni festa parabant 

per celebres ludos indigenanique bovem ; 
grande morae pretium ritus cognosce^ quamvis 5 

difficilis clivis hue via praebet iter. 
Stat vetus et densa praenubilus arbore lucus ; 

adspice — concedas nuinen inesse loco. 1 
accipit ara preces votivaque tnra piorum — 

ara per antiquas facta sine arte manus. 10 
hinc, ubi praesonuit sollemni tibia cantu, 

it per velatas annua pompa vias ; 
ducuntur niveae populo plaudente iuvencae^ 

quas aluit campis herba Falisca suis, 
et vituli nondum metuenda fronte minaces, 15 

et minor ex humili victima porcus hara, 
1 numinis esse locum vuhj. 

" The sisters of Phaethon, the charioteer, were changed to 
trees, and their tears to amber. 



496 



THE AM ORES III. xiii 



of thy sisters, Auriga, weeping tears of amber o'er 
their cheeks a ; of what were ships, but now are 
goddesses of the sea 6 ; of the ill-starred day at 
Atreus' maddened tables, and the rocks that followed 
at stroke of the lyre ? 

41 Measureless pours forth the creative wantonness 
of bards, nor trammels its utterance with history's 
truth. My praising of my lady, too, you should have 
taken for false ; now your easy trust is my undoing. 

XIII 

Since she I wed was sprung from the fruit-bearing 
Faliscan town, it chanced Ave came to the walls 
brought low, Camillus, by thee. The priestesses were 
making ready chaste festival to Juno, with solemn 
games and a cow of native stock ; 'twas well worth 
while to tarry and learn the rites, though the way 
thither is a toilsome road with steep ascents. 

7 There stands an ancient sacred grove, all dark 
with shadows from dense trees ; behold it — you would 
agree a deity indwelt the place. An altar receives 
the prayers and votive incense of the faithful — an 
artless altar, upbuilt by hands of old. From here, 
when the pipe has sounded forth in solemn strain, 
advances over carpeted ways the annual pomp ; snowy 
heifers are led along mid the plaudits of the crowd, 
heifers reared in their native meadows of Faliscan 
grass, and calves that threaten with brow not yet to 
be feared, and, lesser victim, a pig from the lowly sty, 

* Aeneas' ships, transformed that Turnus might not burn 
them. 

c Usually called Falerii. Its site is occupied by Civite 
Castellana. 

497 



OVID 



duxque gregis cornu per tempora dura recurvo. 

invisa est dominae sola capella deae ; 
illins indicio silvis inventa sub altis 

dicitur inceptain destituisse fugam. 20 
nunc quoque per pueros iaculis incessitur index 

et pretium auctori vulneris ipsa datur. 
Qua ventura dea est, iuvenes timidaeque puellae 

praeverrunt latas veste iacente vias. 
virginei crines auro gemmaque premuntur, 25 

et tegit auratos palla superba pedes : 
more patrum Graio velatae vestibus albis 

tradita supposito vertice sacra ferunt. 
ore favent populi tunc cum venit aurea pompa, 

ipsa sacerdotes subsequiturque suas. 30 
Argiva est pompae facies ; Agamemnone caeso 

et scelus et patrias fugit Halaesus opes 
iamque pererratis profugus terraque fretoque 

moenia felici condidit alta manu. 
ille suos docuit Iunonia sacra Faliscos. 35 

sint mikij sint populo semper arnica suo ! 

XIV 

Non ego^ ne pecces, cum sis formosa^ recuso, 

sed ne sit misero scire necesse mihi ; 
nec te nostra iubet fieri censura pudicanij 

sed tamen, ut temptes dissimulare^ rogat. 



498 



THE AMORES III. xiv 



and the leader of the flock, with hard temples over- 
hung by the curving horn. The .she-goat only is hate- 
ful to the mistress-deity ; through her tale-telling, 
they say, the goddess was found in the deep forest 
and made to cease the flight she had entered on." 
Now, even children assail the tattler with their darts, 
and she herself is prize to whoever deals the wound. 

23 Wherever the goddess will pass, youths and 
timid maidens go before, sweeping the broad ways 
with trailing robe. The maidens' locks are pressed 
by gold and gems, and the proud palla covers feet 
that are bright with gold ; in the manner of their 
Grecian sires of yore, veiled in white vestments they 
bear on their heads the sacred offerings of old. The 
crowd keep reverent silence as the golden pomp 
comes on, with the goddess' self close in the wake 
of her ministers. 

31 From Argos is the form of the pomp ; when 
Agamemnon fell, Halaesus left behind both the crime 
and the riches of his fatherland, and after wandering 
an exile over land and sea founded with auspicious 
hand these lofty walls. 'Twas he who taught his 
Faliscans the holy rites of Juno. Ever friendly to 
me, and ever to their folk, may those rites be. 



XIV 

That you should not err, since vou are fair, is not 
my plea, but that I be not compelled, poor wretch, 
to know it ; no censor am I who demands that you 
become chaste, but one who asks that you attempt 

" A story not otherwise known. 



499 



OVID 



lion peewit, quaecumque potest peccasse negare, 5 

solaque famosam culpa professa faeit. 
quis furor est, quae nocte latent, in luce fateri, 

et quae clam facias facta referre palam ? 
ignoto meretrix corpus iunctura Quiriti 

opposita populum summovet ante sera ; 10 
tu tua prostitues famae peccata sinistrac 

commissi perages indiciumque tui ? 
sit tiln mens melior, saltemve imitare pudicas, 

teque probam, quamvis non eris, esse putem. 
quae facis, haec facito ; tantum fecisse negato, 15 

nec pudcat coram verba modesta loqui ! 
Est qui nequitiam locus exigat ; omnibus ilium 

deliciis inple, stet procul inde pudor ! 
hinc simul exieris, lascivia protinus omnis 

absit, et in lecto crimina pone tuo. '20 
illic nec tunicam tibi sit posuisse pudori 

nec femori inpositum sustinuisse femur ; 
illic purpurcis condatur lingua labellis, 

inque modos Venerem mille figuret amor ; 
illic nec voces nec verba iuvantia cessent, 25 

spondaque lasciva mobilitate tremat ! 
indue cum tunicis metuentem crimina vultum, 

et pudor obscenum diffiteatur opus ; 
da populo, da verba mihi ; sine nescius errem, 

et liceat stulta credulitate frui ! 30 
Cur totiens video mitti recipique tabellas ? 

cur pressus prior est interiorque torus ? 
cur plus quam sonino turbatos esse capillos 

collaque conspicio dentis habere notam ? 
tantum non oculos crimen deducis ad ipsos ; 35 

si dubitas famae parcere, parce mihi ! 
mens abit et morior quotiens peccasse fateris, 

perque meos artus frigida gutta fluit. 

500 



THE AMORES III. xiv 



to feign. She does not sin who c;m deny her sin, 
and 'tis only the fault avowed that brings dishonour. 
What madness is this, to confess in the light of day 
the hidden things of night, and spread abroad your 
seeret deeds ? Even the jade that receives some 
unknown son of Quirinus is careful first to slip the 
bolt and exclude the crowd ; and you — will you 
expose your faults to the mercy of evil tongues 
and be the informer to tell of your own misdeeds ? 
Put on a better mind, and imitate, at least, the 
modest of } r our sex, and let me think you honest 
though you are not. What you are doing, continue 
to do ; only deny that you have done, nor be ashamed 
to use modest speech in public. 

17 There is a spot that calls for wantonness ; fill 
that with all delights, and let blushing be far away. 
Once you are forth from there, straight lay all lewd- 
ness aside, and leave your faults in the couch . . . . 
Put on with your dress a face that shrinks from 
guilt, and let a modest aspeet deny the harlot's trade. 
Cheat the people, cheat me ; allow me to mistake 
through ignorance, to enjoy a fool's belief in you ! 

31 Why must I see so often the sending and 
getting of notes ? Why that your couch has been 
pressed in every place? Why do I gaze on hair 
disordered by more than sleep, and see the mark 
of a tooth upon your neck ? Yon all but bring 
your sin before my very eyes ; if you hesitate to 
spare your name, at least spare me ! My mind fails 
me and I suffer death each time you confess your 
sin, and through my frame the blood runs cold. 

S 01 



OVID 



tunc amOj tunc odi frustra quod amare necesse est ; 

tunc ego, sed tecum, mortuus esse veliru ! 40 
Nil equidem inquiram, nee quae celare parabis 

insequar, et falli muneris instar erit. 
si tamen in media deprensa tenebere culpa, 

et fuerint oculis probra videnda meis, 
quae bene visa mihi fuerint, bene visa negato — 45 

concedent verbis lumina nostra tuis. 
prona tibi vinci cupientem vincere palma est, 

sit modo " non feci ! " dicere lingua memor. 
cum tibi contingat verbis superare duobus, 

etsi non causa, iudice vince tuo ! 50 

XV 

Quaere novum vatem, tenerorum mater Amorum ! 

raditur hie elegis ultima meta meis ; 
quos ego conposui, Paeligni ruris alumnus — 

nee me deliciae dedecuere meae — 
siquid id est, usque a proavis vetus ordinis heres, 5 

non modo militiae turbine factus eques. 
Mantua Vergilio, gaudet Verona Catullo ; 

Paelignae dicar gloria gentis ego, 
quam sua libertas ad honesta coegerat arma, 

cum timuit socias anxia Roma manus. 10 

502 



THE AMORES III. xv 



Then do I love you, tlien try in vain to hate what 
I love perforce ; then would I gladly be dead — but 
dead with you ! 

41 I will make no inquiry, be assured, and will 
not follow out what you will make ready to hide ; 
to be deceived shall be as a duty. If none the less 
I shall find you out in the midst of a fault, and my 
eyes perforce shall have looked upon your shame, 
see } T ou deny that I clearly saw what was clearly 
seen — my eyes will yield to your words. 'Twill 
be an easy palm for you — to be victor over one who 
is eager to be vanquished ; all that you need is a 
tongue that remembers "1 did not do it ! " When 
you may win the day by a mere two words, if you 
cannot through your cause, be victor through your 
judge ! 

XV 

Seek a new bard, mother of tender Loves ! I am 
come to the last turning-post my elegies will graze ; 
the elegies whose poet am I — nor have these my 
delights dishonoured me — child reared on Paelignian 
acres, and heir, if that be aught, of a line of grand- 
sires far removed, no knight created but now amid 
the whirlwind of war. 

7 Mantua joys in Virgil, Verona in Catullus ; 'tis I 
shall be called the glory of the Paelignians, race 
whom their love of freedom compelled to honour- 
able arrns when anxious Rome was in fear of the 
allied bands ; a and some stranger, looking on 

a The Social War, 90-89 B.C., by which Rome was com- 
pelled to grant citizenship to the Italians. The Pacligni 
were leaders. 

5°3 



OVID 



atque aliquis spectans hospes Sulmonis aquosi 

moenia, quae campi iugera pauca tenent, 
" Quae tan turn " dicat " potuistis ferre poetam 

quantulacumque estis, vos ego magna voco.' 
Culte puer puerique parens Amathusia culti^ 

aurea de campo vellite signa meo ! 
corniger increpuit thyrso graviore Lyaeus : 

pulsanda est magnis area maior equis. 
inbelles elegit genialis»Musa, valete, 

post mea mansnrum fata superstes opus ! 



504 



THE AMORES III. xv 



watery Sulmo's walls, that guard the scant acres 
of her plain, may say : " O thou who couldst beget 
so great a poet, however small thou art, I name 
thee mighty ! " 

15 O worshipful child, and thou of Amathus, 
mother of the worshipful child, pluck ye up from 
my field your golden standards ! The horned Lyaean 
hath dealt me a sounding blow with weightier 
thyrsus ; I must smite the earth with mighty steeds 
on a mightier course. Unwarlike elegies, congenial 
Muse, O fare ye well, work to live on when I am 
no more ! 



5 °S 



OVID 



VII 

• 

At non formosa est., at non bene culta puella, 

at, puto, non votis saepe petita meis ! 
hanc tamen in nullos tenui male languidus usus, 

sed iacui pigro crimen onusque toro ; 
nec potui cupiens, pariter cupiente puella, 5 

inguinis effeti parte iuvante frui. 
ilia quidem nostro subiecit eburnea collo 

bracchia Sithonia candidiora nive, 
osculaque inseruit cupide luctantia linguis 

lascivum femori supposuitque femur, 10 
et mihi blanditias dixit dominumque voeavit, 

et quae praeterea publica verba iuvant. 
tacta tamen veluti gelida mea membra cicuta 

segnia propositum destituere meum ; 
truncus iners iacui, species et inutile pondus, 15 

et non exactum, corpus an umbra forem. 
Quae mihi ventura est, siquidem ventura, senectus, 

cum desit numeris ipsa iuventa suis ? 
a, pudet annorum cum 1 me iuvenemque virumque 

nec iuvenem nec me sensit arnica virum ! 20 
sic flammas aditura pias aeterna sacerdos 

surgit et a caro fratre verenda soror. 
at nuper bis flava Chlide, ter Candida Pitho, 

ter Libas officio continuata meo est ; 
exigere a nobis angusta nocte Corinnam 25 

me memini numeros sustinuisse novem. 
Num mea Thessalico languent devota veneno 

corpora ? num misero carmen et herba nocent, 

1 cum (quom) Pa.: quo P Br.: quod vulg.: cur Merk.: 
quare Nlm. 

506 



THE AMORES III. vii 



sagave poenicea 1 deftxit nomina cera 

et medium tenuis in iecur egit acus ? 30 
carmine laesa Ceres sterilem vanescit in herbam, 

deficiunt laesi carmine fontis aquae, 
ilicibus glandes cantataque vitibus uva 

decidit, et nullo poma movente fluunt. 
quid vetat et nervos magicas torpere per artes ? 35 

forsitan inpatiens sit latus inde meiim. 
hue pudor accessit facti ; pudor ipse nocebat ; 

ille fuit vitii causa secunda mei. 
At qualem vidi tantum tetigique puellam ! 

sic etiam tunica tangitur ilia sua. 40 
illius ad tactum Pylius iuvenescere possit 

Tithonosque annis fortior esse suis. 
haec mihi contigerat ; sed vir non contigit illi. 

quas nunc concipiam per nova vota preces ? 
credo etiam magnos, quo sum tarn turpiter usus, 45 

muneris oblati paenituisse deos. 
optabam certe recipi — sum nempe reeeptus ; 

oscula ferre — tuli ; proximus esse — fui. 
quo mihi fortunae tantum ? quo regna sine usu? 

quid, nisi possedi dives avarus opes ? 50 
sic aret mediis taciti vulgator in undis 

pomaque, quae nullo tempore tangat, habet. 
a tenera quisquam sic surgit mane puella, 

protinus ut sanctos possit adire deos ? 
Sed, puto, non blande, non optima perdidit in 

me 55 

oscula ; non omni sollicitavit ope ! 
ilia graves potuit quercus adamantaque durum 

surdaque blanditiis saxa movere suis. 
digna movere fuit certe vivosque virosque ; 

sed neque turn vixi nec vir, ut ante, fui. 60 
1 poenicea mdg.; sanguinea P s. 

5°7 



OVID 



quid iuvet, ad surdas si cantet Phemius aures ? 

quid raiserum Thamyran picta tabella iuvat ? 
At quae non tacita formavi gaudia mente ! 

quos ego non finxi disposuique modos ! 
nostra tamen iacuere velut praemortua membra 65 

turpiter hesterna languidiora rosa — 
quae nunc, ecce, vigent intempestiva valentque, 

nunc opus exposcunt militiamque suam. 
quin istic pudibunda iaces, pars pessima nostri ? 

sic sum pollicitis captus et ante tuis. 70 
tu dominum fallis ; per te deprensus inermis 

tristia cum magno damna pudore tuli. 
Hanc etiam non est mea dedignata puella 

molliter admota sollicitare manu ; 
sed postquam nullas consurgere posse per artes 75 

inmemoremque sui procubuisse videt, 
"quid me ludis ? " ait, "quis te, male sane, iubebat 

invitum nostro ponere membra toro ? 
aut te traiectis Aeaea venefica lanis 

devovet, aut alio lassus amore venis." 80 
nec mora, desiluit tunica velata soluta — 

et decuit nudos proripuisse pedes ! — 
neve suae possent intactam scire ministrae, 

dedecus hoc sumpta dissimulavit aqua. 



S o8 



INDEX 



I. HEROIDES 



Abydestus: XYin. 1 ; xix. 100 
Abydos, a town on the Hellespont, 

opposite Sestus: xvm. 12, 127; 

xix. 29, 30 
Acastus, a Greek prince : xin. 25 
Aehaeiades, women of Greece: in. 

71 

Achaia : xvi. 187; xvn. 209 

Achaius : viil. 13 

Acheloius : xvi. 207 

Achclous, a river-god: IX. 139 

Achilles, son of Pel?us and Thetis, 
and lover of Briseis : in. 2f>, 41, 
137; VIII. 45, 87; XX. 69 

Aclullides, Pyrrhus, son of Achilles : 
VIII, 3 

Achivi, a name of the Greeks : l. 21 
Acontius, a youth of Ceos, in love 

with Cydippc of Athens : xx. 239 ; 

XXI. 103, 209, 229 
Actaeon, transformed to a stag by 

Diana, and torn by his own 

hounds : xx. 103 
Actaeus, of Acte, an old name for 

Attica : II. 6 ; xvm. 42 
Actiacus : XV. 166, 185 
Aeacides, Aeacus' son, Achilles : 

I. 35; ni. 87 ; Vin. 7, 33, 55 
Aeetes, Aeeta, father of Medea, 

king of Colchis : VI. 50 ; xn. 

29, 51; XVII. 123 
Aeetine, daughter of Aeetes, 

Medea : vi. 103 
Aegacus : xvi. 118; xxi. 66 
Aegeus, husband of Aethra and 

father of Theseus : x. 131 
Aegidcs, descendants of Aegeus, 

king of Athens, among whom 

was Theseus: II. 67; iv. 59; 

xvi. 327 

Aegiua, bride of Jove, mother of 
Aeacua, father of Peleus : in. 73 

OVID. 



Aegisthus, son of Thyestes, seducer 
of Clytemnestra, murderer of 
Agamemnon : vm. 53 

Aeneas, a Trojan hero, lover of 
Dido, and founder of the Latin 
power: vn. 9, 25, 26, 29, 195 

Aeolis : xi. 5, 34 

Aeolius : xv. 200 

Aeolus, god of the winds : x. 06; 

XI. 65, 95 
Aesonides, Jason, son of Aeson : 

VI. 25, 103, 109; XII. 16. 
Aesonius : XII. 134; xvn. 230 
Aethra, companion of Helen : xvi. 

259; xvn. 150, 267 
Aethra, wife of Aegeus and mother 

of Theseus : x. 131 
Aetna : xv. 11 
Aetnaeus : xv. 12 
Aetolis : ix. 131 
Afer : vn. 169 
Agamemnon : III. 83 
Agamemnonius : ill. 38 
Agrios, brother of Oeneus : ix. 153 
Alcaeus, the poet-friend of Sappho : 

XV. 29 

Alcides, Hercules, grandson of 

Aleeus : IX. 75, 133; XVI. 207 
Alciinedc, Jason's mother : vi. 105 
Alcyone, transformed to a king- 
fisher : xvm. 81 ; xix. 133 
Allecto, one of the Furies : II. 119 
Amazonius : IV. 2; xxi. 119 
Ambracia, a town in Epirus : xv. 
164 

Amor : IV. 11, 148: VII. 32, 59; 

xv. 179; xvi. 16, 203; xvm. 

190; XX. 28, 30, 46, 230 
Amphitryon, husband of Alcincne, 

mother of Hercules: IX. 44 
Amymone, daughter of Danaus, 

loved by Poseidon : Xix. 131 

509 



INDEX 



Amyntor, father of Phoenix, Hi. 27 
Anactorie, a friend of Sappho : xv. 
17 

Ancliises, father of Aeneas : vii. 
162; XVI. 203 

Audrogeus, brother of Ariadne and 
son of Minos of Crete, who im- 
posed on Athens the tribute of 
seven youths and seven maidens 
because of his son's death there : 
X. 99 

Andromache : v. 107; vm. 13 
Andromede, Andromeda, daughter 

of Cepheus, rescued by Perseus : 

xv. 36; xvni. 151 
Andros, an island in the Aegean : 

xxi. 81 
Anna : vii. 191 

Antaeus, King of Libya, the famous 
wrestler throttled by Hercules : 
ix. 71 

Antenor, a Trojan warrior, coun- 
sellor of Priam : v. 95 

Antilochus, son of Nestor. 3lain 
by Meinnon • I. 15 

Antinous, suitor of Penelope : I. 92 

Aonius, of the Aonian mountains, 
in Boeotia : ix. 133 

Apollo : vm. 83; XV. 23 

Aquilo, the north-wind: XI. 13; 
XVI. 345 

Arabs : xv. 76 

Arctophylax, Bootes : xvm. 188 
Arctos, the Lesser Bear : xvm, 149 
Argo, the ship of the Argonauts : 

VI. 65; XII. 9 
Argolicus: I. 25; VI. 80; vm. 74; 

xm. 71 
Argolides : vi. 31 
Argos : xiv. 34 

Ariadne, daughter of Minos, king 
of Crete. Having aided Theseus 
of Athens to find his way in the . 
Labyrinth and thus slay her own 
brother the Minotaur, she flies 
with him, but is abandoned by 
him on the isle of Kaxos, v. hence 
her letter is written : x., title 

Ascanius, son of Aeneas : vii. 77 

Asia : xvi. 177. 355 

Atalanta, daughter of Iasius of 
Arcadia, loved by Meleager : rv. 99 

Athamas, son of Aeolus and father 
of Phrixus and Helle : xvm. 137 

5 10 



Athenae : II. 83 

Atlans, Atlas, who supported the 

world : IX. 18; xvi. 62 
Atracis, of Atrax. a town • in 

Thessaly : xvn. 248 
Atreus, father of Agamemnon and 

Menelaus : vm. 27 
Atrides, Atreus' son, Agamemnon 

or Menelaus : ill. 39, 148 ; v. 

101; xvi. 357, 366 
Atthis, a friend of Sappho • xv. 18 
Auge, a princess of Arcadia, loved 

by Hercules : ix. 49 
Aulis, the port from which the 

Greeks sailed for Troy : xm. 3 
Aurora, the dawn-goddess : iv. 95 ; 

XV. 87; XVI. 201; XVIII. 112 

Baccha : x. 48 

Bacchus : IV. 47 ; v. 115 ; xv. 24, 25 
Beiides, descendant of Belus, father 

of Danaus and Aegyptus : xiv. 73 
Bicorniger, Bacchus : xm. 33 
Bistonis, Tliracian : xvi. 346 
Bistonius, Tliracian, from the Bis- 

tones : II. 90 
Boreas: xm. 15; xvm. 39, 209; 

XXI. 42 

Briseis, the Mysian captive loved 
by Achilles, from whom she was 
taken by Agamemnon to replace 
Chryseis, his own love, an act 
which caused the Wrath of 
Achilles. She writes to reproach 
her lover for not claiming her : 
m. 1, 137; xx. 69 

Busiris, tyrant of Egypt, who 
sacrificed strangers to his god : 
IX. 69 

Calyce, mother of Cycnus : xix 133 

Calydon, home of the famous boar, 
in Aetolia : xx. 101 

Canace, daughter of Aeolus, guilty 
with her brother Macareus, whose 
deep love -he returns. Discovered 
by her father, and bidden to take 
her own life, she writes Macareus 
of her fate. The subject is un- 
pleasant, but the letter one of 
the best: xi., title 

Carthage : <ti. 11, 19 

Cassandra, sister of Paris, a 
prophetess : xvi. 121 



INDEX— HEROIDES 



Cea, an island in the Aegean : XX. 
222 

Oeeropis, Athenian : x. 100 
Oecropins, of Ceerops, Athenian : 
X. 125 

Ceiaeno, a Pleiad : XIX. 135 

Centaurus : XVII. 247 

Cephalus, a hunter loved by 

Aurora : IV. 93; XV. S7 
Cephcius : xv. 35 
Cerberus, a monster of the lower 

world : IX. 94 
Cerealis, sacred to Ceres : iv. 67 
Ceyx, husband of Alcyone and son 

of Lucifer : xvm. 81 
Chalciope : xvn. 232 
Charaxus : XV. 117 
Cinyras, loved by Venus, and father 

of Adonis : iv. 97 
Clymene, companion of Helen : 

XVI. 259; xvn. 267 
Colchi, Medea's home : XII. 23, 

159; XVIII. 157; xix. 175 
Colchus : VI. 131, 130; XII. 1, 9, 

159; xvi. 348 
Corona, a constellation, the Crown : 

xvm, 151 
Corycius, of the Corycian cave on 

Mt. Parnassus : xx. 221 
Creon, king of Corinth : xn. 54 
Cres : xvi. 350 
Cresins : xvi. 301 

Cressa, the Cretan maid Ariadne 
abandoned by Theseus on the 
isle of Naxos : II. 76; IV. 2 

Cretaeus : x. 106 

Crete : x. 67; xvn. 163 

Creusa, daughter of Creon, king 
of Corinth, Jason's wife after 
Medea : XII. 54 

Cupido : xv. 215; xvi. 115 

Cydippe, a maiden of Athens, loved 
byAcontius: xx. 107, 172, 202; 
XXI. 123 

Cydro, a friend of Sappho : xv. 17 
Cynthia, the moon-goddess : xvm. 
74 

Cythcrea : xvi. 20, 138; xvn. 241 
Cytheriacus, of Cythera, the isle 

near which Venus rose from the 

sea : vn. 00 

Daedalus, father of Icarus : xvm. 
49 



Danaus, Danaan or Greek : I. 3; 

III. 86, 1 13, 127; V. 93, 157; 
VIII. 14, 24; XIII. 02, 91. 131 

Danaus, driven with hi* fifty 
d lughters from Africa to Argo; 
by Iih bio!h°r Aegyptus with his 
fifty sons, who wished to slay 
them in order to possess fh whnl" 
kingdom. Overtaken in Argis, 
DLin;ius instructed his daughters 
to many their cousins and slay 
them all : xiv. 15, 79 

Daphne, loved by Apollo : XV. 25 

Dardania, Troy : xvi. 57 

Dardanides, descendant of Dar- 
danus, Trojan: XIII. 79; XVII. 
212 

Dardanius : VIII. 42; xvi. 196, 333 
Dardanus, Trojan: vn. 158; XIII. 
140 

Daulias, Daulian, of Daulis in 
Phocis, the home of Tercus : xv . 
154 

Deianira, daughter of Oeneus and 
Althaea, sister of Meleager, and 
wife of Hercules. Having re- 
ceived news of Oechalii's f ill 
and Hercules' passion for lolc, 
princess of the place, she writes 
a letter of indignation and re- 
proach. As she writes, the mes- 
sage reaches her that Hercules is 
in hi s death agony on Mount 
Oet i, poisoned by the cloak of the 
Centaur .Nes^us, which -die ignor- 
antly sent him supposing it a 
charm (o bring back his love : ix. 
131, 140, 152, 158, 104; XVI. 208 

Deiphobus, brother of Hector, who 
,, married Helen after Paris' death : 
V. 94; XVI. 302 

Delia, the Delian goddess, Diana : 

IV. 40; XX. 95 

Delos : xx. 236 ; xxi. 66, 77, 82, 
102 

Delphi : XXI. 232 

Demophoon, son of Theseus of 
Athens and lover of Phyllis, 
queen of Thrace : n. 1, 25, 98, 
107, 147 

Deucalion, the Greek Noah : xv. 
107, 170 

Diana : IV. 87; xn. 09, 79; xx. 5, 
173, 211, 217; XXI. 7, 03, 105, 149 

CI r 



INDEX 



Dido, queen of Carthage, en- 
nmoured of Aeneas, who touches 
at her city after the fall of Troy, 
but is soon bidden by the gods to 
continue on his way. Learning 
of his intended departure, she 
writes him a letter of mingled 
repro.ich, entreaty, and despair : 
VII. 7, 17, 68, 133, 168, 196 

Diomedes, king of the Bistones of 
Thrace, owner of man-eating 
horses : IX. 67 

Dodonis : VI. 47 

Dolon, a Trojan spy slain by Ulysses 
and Diomedes on the night of 
their expedition to the camp of 
Khesus : I. 39 

Doricus : xvi. 372 

Dryades, mythical beings of the 
wood : iv. 49 

Dulichius, of Dulichium, an island 
near Ithaea : i. 87 

Dysparis, Paris : xin. 43 



Eleleides, followers of Eleleus, or 
Bacchus, from their cry eleleu : 
IV. 47 

Eleus, of Elis in Olympia : XVIII. 
166 

Eleusin : IV. 67 

Elissa, Dido : vn. 102, 193 

Endymion, the shepherd loved by 

Diana : xvm. 63 
Enyo, identified with Bellona. 

goddess of war : xv. 139 
Eos, the dawn : in. 57 
Ephyre, old name of Corinth : xn. 

27 

Erechthis, Orithyia, daughter of 
Erechtheus, king of Atheifs : 
xvi. 345 

Erinys, one of the Furies : vi. 45; 
xi. 103 

Eryeina, epithet of Venus, from 

her mount Eryx in Sicily : xv. 57 
Erymanthus. a mountain of 

Arcadia : IX. 87 
Euenus, a river of Aetolia : IX. 141 
Europe, or Europa, carried off by 

Jove in form of a bull : iv. 55 
Eurns : VII. 42; XI. 9, 14; XV. 9 
Eurybates, herald of Agamemnon : 

III. 9 

512 



Eurymaehus, suitor of Penelope : 

I. 92 

Eurystheus, king of Mycenae, who 
imposed the twelve labors on 
Hereules : IX. 7, 45 

Eurytis, Iole, daughter of Eurytus, 
king of Oechalia : ix. 133 

Faunus : rv. 49 

Gaetulus, of a certain North African 
tribe : vn. 125 

Gargara, part of Ida : xvi. 109 

Geryones, three-bodied monster, 
owner of cattle stolen by Her- 
cules : ix. 92 

Gnosis, Ariadne of Gnosus, or 
Cnossus, in Crete : xv. 26. 

Gnosius. Cretan : iv. 68 

Gorge, sister of Deianira : IX. 165 

Graeeia : in. 84; xvi. 342 

Graecus : 111. 2 

Graiusrv. 117, 118;vin. 112; 
XII. 10, 30, 203; xvi. 33 

Haemonis : xni. 2 

Haemonius, Thracian : vi. 23 ; XII, 

127; xin. 2; xvii. 248 
Haemus, a mountain of Thrace : 

II. 113 

Hebrus, a river of Thrace : 11. 15, 
114 

Heeataeon, father of Calyce : xix. 
133 

Hecate, deity of enchantment : 
xii. 168 

Heetor: 1. 36; in. 86; v. 93; xm. 

65, 68; XVI. 367; xvii. 255 
Hectoreus : I. 14; ill. 126 
Hecuba, Priam's queen : v. 84 
Helene, of Troy : v. 75 ; VIII. 99 ; 

XVI. 2S1, 287; XVII. 134 
Helice, the Great Bear : xvm. 149 
Helle, see I'hrixus : xvm. 141 ; xix, 

123, 128 

Hellespontiacus : xvm. 108; xix. 
32 

Hercules, son of Jove and Alcmena : 
IX. 18, 27, 129, 149 

Hereuleus : IX. 57, 64 

Hennione, daughter of Menelaus 
and Helen, given in marriaga 
against her will by Agamemnon 
to Achilles" son Pyrrhus, in fulfil- 



INDEX— HEROIDES 



ment ol a promise made at Troy. 
Her letter is a pathetic appeal to 
her lover Orestes, Agamemnon's 
son and her own cousin, to whom 
she hud previously been promised 
by her grandfather Tyndareus, 
to assert his right : vm. 59; xvi. 
25G 

Hero, a maid of Sestus. In Mus- 
aeus, a late- Greek poet, she i3 
priestess of Aphrodite: xviii., 
xix., titles 

Hesione, daughter of Laomedon, 
loved by Telamon, and mother of 
Teucer : xx. 69 

Hiberus, Spanish : ix. 91 

Hippodamia, bride of Pelops : 
vm. 70; xvi. 266; bride of 
Pirithous : xvn. 248 

Hippolytc : xxi. 120 

Hippolytus, son of Theseus and 
Hippolyte : IV. 36, 164; xxi. 10 

Hippomenes, lover of Atalanta, 
who won the race with her, and 
herself, t>y dropping golden apples 
to delay her: xvi. 265; xxi. 124 

Hippotades, Aeolus, son of Hippotes , 
king of the winds : xvm. 46 

Hyllus : IX. 44, 168 

Hymen: VI. 44, 45; IX. 134; XII. 
137, 143; xrv. 27 

Hymenaeus : n. 33; xi. 101; xn. 
143; xiv. 27; xxi. 157 

Hypermestra, one of the fifty 
daughters of Danaus bidden by 
their father to slay in one night 
their husbands, the fifty sons of 
Danaus" brother Aegyptus. She 
was tho only one to disobey, and 
writes from the prison into which 
herfath n rhas cast her to Lynceus, 
the husband she spared and 
helped escape : xiv. 1, 53, 129 

Hypsipyle, queen of Lemnos, with 
whom Jason, on the Argonautic 
expedition, remained two years 
as lover and promised husband. 
She writes after hearing of his 
flight with Medea and the Golden 
Fleece: VI. 8, 59, 132, 152; xvn. 
193 

Iarbas, a Gactulian prince who 
courted Dido : vn. 125 

OVID 



Iardania, Omphale, daughter of 
Iardanus, a queen of Lydia loved 
by Hercules : IX. 103 

Iason, leader of the expedition for 
the Golden Fleece : vi. 37, 77, 
119, 139; XII. 151; XIX. 175 

Icarius, father of Penelope : I. 81 

Ida, Ide: v. 73, 138; XIII. 53; xvi. 
53, 110; xvn. 115 

Idaeus : rv. 48; vm. 73; XVI. 204, 
303; XIX. 177 

Idyia, mother of Medea : xvti. 232 

Uiacus : xm. 38; xvil. 215, 221; 
xxi. 118 

llias, a woman of Uion : xvi. 333 

llioneus, a Trojan : xvi. 362 

llios, Ilion, a name of Troy : 1. 43; 
vii. 151 ; xm. 53 

Iole, princess of Oechalia, loved by 
Hercules : ix. 6, 133 

Ioniacus, Ionian : ix. 73 

Iphiclus, father of Protesilaus of 
Phylace, in Thessaly : xni. 25 

Inachis, of Inachus, Argive : Xiv, 
23, 105 

Inachius : XIII. 134 

Io, transformed into a heifer, 
guarded by Argus, delivered by 
Hermes, tormented by Juno'a 
gadfly, and changed back to 
human form in Egypt, where she 
became Isis : referred to in xrv. 84 

Irus, the beggar in Ulysses' palace : 
I. 95 

Ismarius, of Ismarus, In Thrace, 
Thracian : I. 46; XV. 154 

Isthmos, of Corinth : vm. 69 ; xn. 
104 

Italus, Italian, of King Italus : vn. 
• 9 

Itys. son of Tereus and Procne : 

xv. 154, 155 

lulus, son of Aeneas, called also 
Ascanius: vu. 75, 83, 137, 153 

Iuno : II. 41; IV. 35; v. 35; VI. 
43, 45; ix. 5, 11, 26, 45; xn. 87; 

xvi. 65; xvn. 133. 
Iunonius : xiv. 84 

Iuppiter: m. 73; IV. 36, 55, 163; 
VI. 152; VTII. 48, 68, 78; IX. 22; 
X. 68; XI. 18; xm. 50, 144; 
xiv. 28, 88 95, 99; xvi. 72.81, 
166, 175, 214, 252, 274, 292, 294; 
xvn. 50, 53, 55; xvin, 153 

513 

i.r. 



INDEX 



Lacaena, Laconian, Helen : v. 99 
Lacedaemon : I. 5; vin. 11; XVI. 

131; xix. 177 
Laertes, father of Ulysses : I. 98, 

105, 113 
Lamus, a son of Hercules : IX. 54 
Latmius, of Mt. Latmos, where 

Endymion was loved by Diana ' 

xviil. 62 

Latois, Diana, daughter of Leto : 
xxi. 153 

Laudamia, wife of Protesilaus, 
Prince of Phylace, in Thessaly. 
Detained at Aulis with the Greek 
expedition, he receives a letter 
full of love from her, warning 
him of the prophecy that the 
first of the Greeks to set foot on 
Trojan soil shall die : xin. 2, 36, 
70 

Laudice, a beauty : XIX. 135 

Laumedon : xvu. 58, 206 

Leandru°, a youth of Abydos, in 
love with Hero of Sestus to whom 
he swam across the Hellespont 
until drowned in a storm. "When 
and how the popular story arose 
is not clear. The simplest theory 
is to hold that the story is a fact 
which actually occurred in the 
first century B.C., and v hich the 
Romans became acquainted with 
in the time of Virgil." — Palmer, 
notes to xviil. : xix. 1, 40, 150, 
185 

Leda, mother of Castor and Pollux : 
Vin. 78; XVI. 294; xvn. 55 

Ledaeus : xin. 61 ; xvi. 1 

Lemniades : VI. 53, 139 

Lemnos : VI. 50, 117, 136 

Lernaeus, of Lerna, the home of the 
Hydra slain by Hercules : IX. 115 

Lesbias : XV. 16 

Lesbis : m. 36; xv. 100, 199, 200, 
201 

Lesbos, the island of Sappho : xv. 
52 

Leucadius, of the island of Leucadia, 
whence legend says Sappho 
leaped : xv. 166, 180, 187, 220 
Leucas, Leucadia : XV. 172 
Leucippides, daughters of Leucip- 
pus, stolen by Castor and Pollux : 
xvi. 329 

514 



Liber, Bacchus : xvm. 153 
Lucifer, the morning star : xviil. 
112 

Lucina, goddess of childbirth : vi. 

122; XI. 55 
Luna : xi. 46 
Lydus : IX. 54 
Lycia: I. 19 

Lycurgus, the king of Thrace 
whose hostility to Dionysus was 
followed by madness and death : 
n. Ill 

Lynceus, the only one saved of the 
fifty sons of Aegyptus : xiv. 123 

Lyrnesia, of Lyrnesus, in Mysia : 
m. 45 



Macareus, son of Aeolus and lover 
of his sister Canace : xi. 21 

Maeandros, a river in Asia Minor : 
vn. 2; rx. 55 

Maenalius, of Mt. Maenalus, in 
Arcadia : TV. 99 

Maeonius, Lydian : ix. 65 

Magnetis, of Magnesia, a country of 
Thessaly : xn. 9 

Mars : m. 45, 88 ; vi. 10, 32, 35 ; 
vn. 154; xn. 41; xv. 92; xvi. 
372; xvn. 253 

Medea, daughter of Aeetes, king of 
Colchis, and wife of Jason, whom 
by her enchantress' art she aided 
to gain the Golden Fleece. De- 
serted and ordered into exile 
by Jason, who marries Creusa, 
daughter of Creon, king of 
Corinth, with her children and 
Jason's she leaves the palace in 
transports of grief, jealousy, and 
rage, and writes a passionate 
letter filled w ith reproach : vi. 
75, 127, 128, 151 ; XII. 5, 25, 182 ; 
xvn. 229, 233 

Medon, suitor of Penelope : I. 91 

Medusa : xix. 134 

Melanthius, goatherd of Ulysses 
and friend of the suitors : I. 95 

Meleager, son of Althaea and 
hunter of the Calydonian boar: 
ix. 151 

Menelaus : v. 105 ; vm. 37 ; XIII. 
47, 73; xvi. 205, 457; xvn. 110, 
154, 249 



INDEX— HEROIDES 



Menoetiades, Menoetius* son Patro- 
clu9, friend of Achillea: I. 17; 
HI. 23 

Methymnias, a woman of Methymna 

in Lesbos : XV. 15 
Minerva : v. 36 

Minois, Ariadne, daughter of Minos 

of Crete : xvi. 349 
Minoius, of Minos : IV. 61 ; XVII. 193 
Minos, king of Crete: IV. 157; 

X. 91 ; xvi. 350 
Minous, of Minos : VI. 114 
Minyae, the Argonauts : VI. 47 ; 

xn 65 

Mycenae : Agamemnon's capital, 

vii. 165 
Mycenaeus : III. 109; v. 2 
Myconos, an island : xxi. 81 
Mygdonius, Phrygian : XV. 142; 

xx. 106 

Myrtous, of the island Myrtos : 
xvi. 210 

Naias, a Naiad, a water-nymph : 
xv. 162 

Neleius, applied to Neleus' son . 

Nestor : I. 64 
Nemaeus : IX. 61 

Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, also 
called Pyrrhus : vni. 82, 115 

Neptunius : III. 151; rv. 109; xvil. 
21 

Neptunus : XIII. 129; XIX. 129, 137 
Nereides, daughters of Nereus, 

deity of the ocean : v. 57 
Nereus, son of Oeeanus and Tethys, 

sea deity, father of Thetis, the 

mother of Achilles: m. 74; ix. 

14 

Nesseus, of Nessus, the Centaur 
slain by Hercules for an insult, to 
Deianira, whom he was currying 
across the Euenus. In his list 
moments he gave her some of his 
poisoned blood, or his tunic 
dipped in it, as a supposed love- 
charm : i.x. 163 

Nestor, of Pylos, an aged warrior 
and counsellor in the Ureek army, 
I. 38, 63 

Nilus : Xiv. 107 

Nisias, a Sicilian woman : xv. 54 
Notus : II. 12; m. 58; x. 30; xi. 
13, 76 



Oebalis, Spartan, descendant »f 
Oebalus, father of Tyndarus : 
xvi. I2S 

Oechalia, a city of Euboea taken by 
Hercules : IX. 1, 130 

Oenidcs, son of Oeneus, Meleager : 
HI. 92; IV. 99 

Oenone, a river-nymph, wife of 
Paris on Ida before his recognition 
as Priam's son. Abandoned by 
him and supphiuled by Helen, 
she writes a letter of reproach 
and warning, and asserts her own 
faithfulness : v. 3, 22, 29, 32, 80, 
115, 133; xvi. 97; xvil. 196 

Oeta, the mountain between 
Aetolia and Thessaly on which 
llercules died : ix. 147 

Ogygius, of Ogygus of Thebes, 
Theban, applied to Bacchus : x. 
48 

Olenium (pecus), the star Capra: 
xvni. 188 

Orestes, son of Agamemnon, hus- 
band of Hermione : vin. 9, 15, 
59, 101, 115 

Ormenis, Astydamla, grand- 
daughter of Ormenus : IX. 50 

Pagasaeus, of Pagasae, in Thessaly, 
where the Argo was built : xvi. 
347; XIX. 175 

Palaeinon, son of Athamas, son 
of Aeolus, transformed to a 
marine deity : xvur. 159 

Palladius : xvn. 133 

Palla3 : xvi. 65, 108 

Pallas, meaning the olive-oil of 
which she was the deity : xix. 
44 

Par. : iv. 171 

Parca, a Fate : xi. 105 

Paris, who gave to Venus the prize 
for beauty, and was aided by hrr 
In the rape of Helen. He was at 
first a shepherd on Mt. Ida, and 
liter recognized as a son of 
Priam: v. 29, 32; via. 22; xvi. 
49, 83, 163, 358; XVII. 33, 100, 
254 ; XX. 49 

Parrhasia, Arcadian, from the tribe 
of the Parrhasii : xvni. 152 

Parthcnlus, of Mt. Parthenlus In 
Arcadia : IX. 49 

515 



INDEX 



Pasiphae, wife of Minos, mother of 
Ariadne, Phaedra, and the Mino- 
taur : iv. 57 

Pegasis, fountain-nymph, a term 
applied to Oenone : v. 3 ; of 
Pegasus, a Muse : xv. 27 

Pelasgias, Greek : IX. 3 

Pelasgis, a descendant of Pelasgus : 
XV. 217 

Pelasgus, king of Argos : xiv. 23 
Pelasgus, ' the adjective : xii. 83 ; 

XVII. 239 
Peleus, husband of Thetis and 

father of Achilles : in. 135 
Pelias, of Pelion, a mountain in 

Thessaly : m. 126 ; xii. 8 
Pelias, usurper of Iolcus, uncle of 

Jason : vi. 101 ; xn. 129 
Pelides, son of Peleus, Achilles : 

vm. 83 
Pelopeius : vm. 27, 81 
Pelops, son of Tantalus and father 

of Atreus and Thyestes : vin. 47 ; 

xvil. 54 

Penates, household deities : III. 67 ; 
vn. 77 

Penelope, wife of Ulysses, who was 
absent ten years at the siege of 
Troy, and did not reach home for 
ten years more. Her letter is 
written not long after the fall of 
Troy: i. 1, 84 

Penthesilea : xxi. 118 

Pergama, Troy : I. 32, 51 ; in. 152; 
xvn. 205 

Persephone, daughter of Ceres : 
xxi. 46 

Perseus, son of Jove and Danae : 

xv. 35; xvni. 153 
Phaedra, daughter of Minos and 

wife of Theseus, of who^e son 

Hippolytus, a chaste devotee of 

Diana, she is enamoured. Her 

letter is a declaration of passion : 

iv. 74, 112 
Phaon, legendary lover of Sappho : 

XV. 11, 90, 123, 193, 203 
Phasiacus : xii. 10 
Phasias, daughter of the Phasis, 

Medea : vi. 103 
Phasis, a river near Colchis : VI. 

108; xvi. 347; xix. 176 
Phoebe, sister of Helen : vm. 

77 

516 



Phoebe, Diana, the moon-goddess : 

xv. 89; xx. 229 
Phoebeus, of Phoebus Apollo : xvi 

182 

Phoebus : I. 67 ; x. 91 ; xi. 45 ; xin. 

103; XV. 25, 165, 181, 183, 188 
Phoenix, envoy to Achilles : in. 129 
Pherecleus, of Phereclus, who built 
the ships in which Paris sailed 
to carry away Helen ; xvi. 22 
Phrixeus : vi. 104; xn. 8 
Phrixus, who, with his sister Helle, 
escaped through the air on the 
golden ram from Ino, their step- 
mother. Helle having been lost 
in the waters afterwards called 
the Hellespont, her brother 
arrived in Colchis, married King 
Aeetes' daughter Chalciope, and 
sacrificed the ram to Zeus 
(Jove). Aeetes hung up its 
golden fleece in the grove of Ares 
(Mars), whence it was taken by 
Jason, whose usurping uncle 
Pelias hid sent him for it in the 
hope that he would lose his life : 
xvni. 143; xix. 163 
Phrygia: ix. 128; xvi. 143 
Phrygius: 1.54; v. 3, 120; vn. 68; 
vm. 14; xni. 58; xvi. 107, 186, 
264; XVII. 57, 227 
Phryx: xvi. 198, 203; xvn. 200 
Phthias : vn. 165 

Phthius, of Phthia, a city of 
Thessaly, Achilles' birthplace : 

III. 65 
Phylaceis : xm. 35 

Phylleides, women of Phyllos in 
Thessaly : xm. San. 

Phyllis, queen of Thrace, who 
sheltered and loved Demophonn, 
son of Theseus of Athens. His 
failure to keep faith and return 
is the occasion of her letter : n. 
1, 60, 98, 105, 106, 138, 147 

Pirithous, who, with his friend 
Theseus, descended to Hades : 
iv. 110, 112 

Pisander, suitor of Penelope : I. 91 

Pittheius, of Pittheus, king of 
Troezen, grandfather of Theseus : 

IV. 107 

Pittheis, daughter of Pittheus, king 
of Troezen : x. 131 



INDEX— HEROIDES 



Pleione, wife of Atlas, mother of the 
Pleiades, grandmother of Her- 
mes : xvi. 62 
Plias : xvi. 175; xvm. 188 
Polybus, suitor of Penelope : I. 91 
Polydamas, friend of Hector : v. 94 
Pontus: xn. 28; xvm. 157 
Priamide3 : v. 11 ; xni. 43 ; xvi. 1 
Priamus, king of Troy, father of 
fifty sons, among whom were 
Hector and Paris: I. 4, 34; in. 
20; V. 82, 83, 95; XVI. 48, 98, 
209; xvn. 58, 211 
Procrustes, the robber who fitted 
his victims to the famous bed by 
stretching them or cutting them 
short : n. 69 
Protesilaus, see Laudamia : xm. 12, 

16, 84, 156 
Pygmalion, brother of Dido : vii. 
150 

Pylos, Nestor's home : I. 63, 64, 100 
Pyrrhias, a woman of Pyrrha, in 

Lesbos : xv. 15 
Pyrrha, wife of Deucalion : xv. 

167, 169 

Pyrrhus, son of Achilles, also called 
Neoptolemus : m. 136; vni. 3, 
8, 33, 42, 103 

Rhesus, a Thracian ally of Troy, 
slain by Ulysses, who stole 
his horses to keep them from 
drinking of the Xanthus or feed- 
ing on the plain of Troy. An 
oracle has declared that Troy 
would not be taken if the horses 
thus drank and fed : I. 39 

Rhodope, a mountain in Thrace : 
II. 113 

Rhodopeius : II. 1 

Samius, of Samos, the Homeric 
Cephallenia, an island near 
Ithaca : I. 87 

Sappho, a poetess of Mytilene, in 
Lesbos, about 600 B.C., was sur- 
rounded by a coterie of literary 
women, and was a friend of 
Alcaeus. According to legend, 
she was enamoured of Phaon, 
and leaped from the Leucadlan 
Hock in the hope of curing her 
passion: xv. 3, 155, 183, 217 



Saturnus, father of Jove : rv. 132 
Satyrus, a woodland creature : rv. 

171; v. 135 
Schoeueis, Atalanta, daughter of 

Schoeneus : XVI. 265 ; XXI. 123 
Sciron, the robber of the Scironian 

rocks, slain by Theseus : n. 69 
Scylla : xu. 123, 124 
Scyrius, of Scyros, the island where 

Achilles and Pyrrhus were reared : 

vin. 112 
Scythia : vi. 107; xn. 27 
Sestus, a town on the Hellespont, 

opposite Abydos : xvm. 127 ; 

also the adjective : xvm. 2 
Sicanus, Sicilian : xv. 57 
Sicelis : XV. 51, 52 
Sidonius : IX. 101 
Sigeus, or Sigelus, of Slgeum, near 

Troy : I. 33; xvi. 21, 275 
Simois, a river near Troy : I. 33; 

VII. 145; xm. 53 
Sinis, the robber who tied his vic- 
tims to two pine trees which he 

bent down for the purpose, and 

then let spring back : II. 70 
Sisyphiua, Corinthian : xn. 204 
Sithonis, of Sithonia, part of Thrace ; 

used for Thracian : II, 6 
Sithonius : xi. 13 
Soror, a Fate : xv. 81 
Sparte : I. 65; xvi. 189, 191; XVII. 

209 

Sthenelelus, of Sthenelus, father 

of Eurystheus : IX. 25 
Stygius, of the river Styx : XVI. 

211 

Sychacus, Dido's first husband, a 
Tyrian : vii. 97, 99, 193 

Symplegades. the clashing rocks 
through which the Argo passed : 
XII. 121 



Taenarls, of Tacnarus, a promon- 
tory of Laconia : xvi. 30 ; xvn. 
6; Helen : vm. 73 

Taenarius, of Taenarus : xm. 45; 
xvi. 276 

Talthybius, herald of Agamemnon : 

ill. 9, 10 
Tanals, a river of Scythia : vi. 107 
Tantalides, a descendant of Tan- 
talus : vm. 45, 122; xvn. 54 

517 



INDEX 



Tantalis, a female descendant of 

Tantalus : vm. 122 
Tegaeus, of Tegea, a town in 

Arcadia : IX. 87 
Telemachus, son of Ulysses : i. 93, 

107 

Telamon, a Greek hero at Troy : 

in. 27; xx. 69 
Tenedos, an island in the Aegean : 

Xin. 53 

Tenos, an island in the Aegean : 
XXI. 81 

Teucer. son of Telamon, and brother 

of Ajax : in. 130 
Teucri, Trojans : vn. 140 
Teuthrantius, of Teuthras, father 

of Thespius, king of Thespia : 

ix. 51 

Thalia, a Muse : xv. 84 
Thebae : II. 71 

Therapnaeus, of Therapne, a town 
in Lacedaemon : XVI. 198 

Theseus, the great hero of Attic 
legend : II. 13; IV. 65, 111, 119; 
V. 127, 128; X. 3, 10, 21, 34, 35, 
75, 101, 110, 151; XVI. 149, 329, 
349; XVII. 33 

Thesides, Hippolytus : IV. 65 

Thessalia : vi. 1 

Thessalicus : ix. 100 

Thessalis, Thessalian : Xin. 112 

Thessalus : VI. 23 ; XVI. 347 ; xvili. 
158 

Thetis, a sea-nymph, mother of 

Achilles : xx. 60 
Thoantias, Hypsipyle, daughter of 

Thoas : vi. 163 
Thoas, father of Hypsipyle : vi. 

114, 135 
Thrace : II. 84 
Thrax : H. 81 ; XVI. 345 
Threicius : n. 108; m. 113; IX. 89 
Thressus : xix. 100 
Thybris : VII. 145 

Tipliys, the helmsman of the 

Argonauts : vi. 48 
Tisiphone, one of the Furies : ii. 

117 

Titan, the sun : vm. 105 ; xv. 135 
Tithonus : xvni. Ill 



Tlepolemus, a Greek (Rhodian) 
prince in the Trojan war, slain 
by Sarpedon : 1. 19, 20 
Tonans, the Thunderer : ix. 7 
Trinacria, Sicily : XII. 126 
Triton, a sea deity : vn. 50 
Tritonis, of Pallas Athena : vi. 47n. 
Troas, a Trojan woman : xin. 137 ; 

the adjective : xin. 94 ; xvi. 185 
Troezen, to the south of Corinth : 

IV. 107 

Troia : I. 3, 4. 24, 49, 53; V. 139; 

vni. 104; xni. 71, 87, 123; XVI. 

92, 107. 295, 338 ; xvn. 210 
Troicus : I.2S; vn. 184; xvn. 109, 

160 

Tros, a Trojan : I. 13 
Tydeus, brother of Deianira : ix. 
155 

Tyndareus, father of Helen : vm. 

31 ; xvn. 54, 250 
Tyndaris, Helen, daughter of 

Tyndareus : v. 91 ; xvi. 100, 

308; xvn. 118 
Typhois, of Typhoeus, a Giant 

buried under Aetna : xv. 11 
Tyrius : vn. 151 ; xn. 179 
Tyro, loved by Poseidon, and mother 

of Pelias and Neleus : xix. 132 
Tyro3 : xvni. 149 

TJlixes, prince of Ithaca, hero in 
the Trojan War : 1. 1, 35, 84 ; ni. 
129; xix. 148 

Ursa, the Bear : xvm. 152 

Venus: n. 39; in. 16; rv. 49, 88, 
97, 102, 136, 167; v. 35; vn 31; 
ix. 11; xv. 91, 213; xvi. 35, 65, 
83, 140, 160, 285, 291, 298; xvn. 
115, 126, 131, 141, 253; XVin. 
69 ; xix. 159 

Xanthus, a river of the Troad : 

V. 30, 31 ; xin. 53 

Zacynthos, an island near Ithaca : 
I. 87 

Zephyrus : XI. 13 ; xrv. 39 ; xv. 

203 



5l8 



INDEX 

II. AMORES 



ABantiaDEs, Perseus, descendant 

of Abas : ni. xii. 24 
Accins, writer of tragedy : I. xv. 19 
Achelous, a river between Aetolia 

and Acarnania : ill. vi. 35, 103 
Achilles: I. ix. 33; n. i. 29, viii. 

13, xviii. 1 ; m. ix. 1 
Aeaeus, of Aea, Circe's isle : I. viii. 

5 ; II. xv. 10 ; in. vii. 79 
Aegyptius : Hi. ix. 33 
Aeneas: i. viii. 42; n. xiv. 17, 

xviii. 31 ; ill. ix. 13 
Aeneius, of Aeneas : I. xv. 25 
Aeolius : in. xii. 29 
Aeonius : II. xviii. 26 
Aesonius, describing Jason, son of 

Aeson : I. xv. 22 
Aetolia : III. vi. 37 
Agamemnon : in. xiii. 31 
Ajax, the Greek hero : I. vii. 7 
Alcides, Hercules : in. viii. 52 
Alcinous, king of the Phaeacians: 

I. x. 66 
Alpes : n. xvi. 19 
Alpheus, a river near Olympia : m. 

vi. 29 

Amathusia, of Amathus, a seat of 

Venus in Cyprus : in. xv. 15 
Amor: I. i. 26, ii. 8, 18, 32, iii. 12, 

vi. 34, 37, 59, 60, x. 15; II. i. 3, 

38, ix. 34, xviii. 4, 15, 18, 19, 36; 

m. i. 20, 43, 69, iv. 20, xv. 1 
Araymone, daughter of Danaus, 

loved by Poseidon : I. x. 5 
Andromache : I. ix. 35 
Anien, a river flowing into the 

Tiber near Home : in. vi. 51 
Anubis, a dog-headed deity of 

Egypt, associated with Isis and 

Osiris : II. xiii. 11 
Aonius, of Aonia, near Mount 

Helicon : I. i. 12 



Apia : n. xiii. 14 

Apollo : I. xiv. 31, xv. 35; in. iii. 

29 

Aratus, who wrote on Astronomy : 
I. xv. 16 

Arcadia virgo, Arethusa : in. vi. 30 
Argeus, Argive : m. vi. 46 
Argivus : I. ix. 34; in. xiii. 31 
Argolicus : II. vi. 15 
Argus, the many-eyed guardian of 

lo : in. iv. 20 
Armenius : n. xiv. 35 
Ascraeus, Hesiod, of Ascrae in 

Boeotia : I. xv. 11 
Asia : n. xii. 18 
Asopis : in. vi. 41 
Asopos, a river of Boeotia : in. vi. 

33 

Assyrius : II v. 40 

Atalanta, daughter of Iasius of 

Arcadia : in. ii. 29 
Atracis, Hippodamia of Atrax in 

Thessaly, wife of Pirithous and 

cause of the fight between 

Centaurs and Lapiths : I. iv. 8 
Atreus : in. xii. 39 
Atrides, Agamemnon, son of 

Atreus: I. ix. 37; n. i. 30, xii. 10 
Auriga, the charioteer Phaethon: 

in. xii. 37 
Aurora : I. xiii. 3; n. iv. 43 
A vermis, the lake which was an 

entrance to the lower world : 

III. ix. 27 

Bacche, a Bacchante : I. xiv. 21 
Bacchus : I. il. 47, xiv. 32; in. ii. 

53, iii. 40 
Bagous, Bagoas : U. ii. 1 
Battiades, Callimachus : I. xv. 13 
Bithynis : ni. vi. 25 
Blanditiae : i. ii. 35 

5^9 



INDEX 



Boreas : I. vi. 53; II. xi. 10 
Briseis, the Mysian captive loved 
by Achilles : I. ix. 33 ; II. viii. 11 
Britannus : II. xvi. 39 

Caesar: I. ii. 51; II. xiv. 18; III. 

viii. 52, xii. 15 
Callimachus, of Cyrene, the princi- 
pal Alexandrian poet: II. iv. 19 
Calvus, a poet of Catullus' time : 

in. ix. 62 
Calydon, home of Deianira, wife of 

Hercules : III. vi. 37 
Calypso, a nymph who loved 

Ulysses : II. xvii. 15 
Camillus, a lioman general of the 

fourth century B.C. : in. xiii. 2 
Campus, i. e. Maitius : III. viii. 57 
Canopus, a town near Alexandria : 

II. xiii. 7 

Carpathius senis, Proteus : II. xv. 
10 

Cassandra, the prophetess-daughter 

of Priam : I. vii. 17 
Castalius : I. xv. 36 
Castor : II. xvi. 13; ill. ii. 54 
Catullus : in. ix. 62, xv. 7 
Cecropis, Athenian : ill. xii. 32 
Cephalus, a huntsman loved by 

Aurora : I. xiii. 39 
Cepheia virgo, Andromeda, daugh- 
ter of Cepheus. Her mother Cas- 
siopeia offended the Nereids and 
Neptune by boasting her beauty, 
and they afflicted Cepheus' land 
with a sea-monster, to which 
Andromeda had to be exposed. 
She was rescued by Perseus : in. 
iii. 17 

Ceraunia, a promontory of Epirus : 

II. xi. 19 
Cerealia : ill. vi. 15, x. 1 
Ceres: I. i. 9, xv. 12; n. xvi. 7; 

m. ii. 53, vii. 31, x. 3, 11, 24, 42 
Charybdis, a whirlpool : n. xi. 18, 

xvi. 25 

Chlide, a love of Ovid : m. vii. 23 
Cilices : n. xvi. 39 
Colchis, Medea : II. xiv. 29 
Corinna : I. v. 9, xi. 5; II. vi. 48, 
viii. 6, xi. 8, xii. 2, xiii. 2, 25, 

xvii. 7, 29, xix. 9 ; IU. i. 49, vii. 
25. xii. 16 

Corsicus : I. xii. 10 

520 



Cressa, Ariadne : I. vii. 16 
Cretaeus : in. x. 25 
Crete : III. x. 20, 37 
Cretes : in. x. 19 

Creusa, daughter of Erechtheus of 

Athens : in. vi. 31 
Cupido : I. i. 3, ii. 19, vi. 11, ix. 1, 

xi. 11, xv. 27; 11. v. 1, ix. 1, 33, 

47, 51, xii. 27; in. i. 41 
Cypassia : n. vii. 17, viii. 2, 22, 27 
Cythera, an island sacred to Venus : 

11. xvii. 4 
Cytherea, Venus : 1. iii. 4 



Danae, mother of Perseus, loved by 
Jove: 11. xix. 27, 28; m iv. 
21 

Danaeius heros, Perseus, son of 

Danae : in. vi. 13 
Danaus : n. ii. 4 

Deianira, wife of Hercules : ni. vi. 
38 

Delia, sung by Tibullus : in. ix. 31, 

55 

Diana : II. v. 27; III. ii. 31 
Dido : n. xviii. 25 
Dione, Venus : 1. xiv. 33 
Dipsas : 1. viii. 2 



Egeria, a nymph who counselled 
Numa, king of Pome : n. xvii. 18 
Elegeia : in. i. 7, ix. 3 
Elissa, Dido : n. xviii. 31 
Elysius: n. vi. 49; in. ix. 60 
Encelados, a Giant who fought with 

Jove : in. xii. 27 
Enipeus, a river of Thessaly : ni. 
vi. 43 

Ennius, father of Roman poetry : 

I. xv. 19 
Eous : I. xv. 29 ; II. vi. 1 
Error : I. ii. 35 

Erycina, Venus of Mount Eryx : n. 
x. 11 

Eryx, a mountain in Sicily, sacred 

to Venus : III. ix. 45 
Euanthe, loved by the Nile : ni. 

vi. 41 
Europa : n. xii. 18 
Eurotas, river of Sparta : 1. x. 1 ; 

H. xvii. 32 
Eurus, the east wind : 1. iv. 11, ix. 

13; n. xi. 9; m. xii. 29 



INDEX— AMORES 



1'aliscus, of Falerii, an Etruscan 
city north of Rome : in. xiii. 1, 
14, 35 

Furor : I. ii. 35 

Galatea, daughter of Nereus, a 

sea deity : II. xi. 34 
Gallicus : II. xiii. 18 
Gallus, father of Roman elegy, 

friend of Virgil : I. xv. 29, 30 ; 

III. ix. 64 
Gangetis, of the Gauges, Indian : 

I. ii. 47 
Gerniania : I. xiv. 45 
Graecinus, a friend of Ovid : II. x. 1 
Graius : ill. xiii. 27 

Gyes, Gyas, a Giant : II. i. 12 

Haemonius, Thessalian : I. xiv. 40 ; 

II. i. 32, ix. 7 
Halaesus : III. xiii. 32 

Hector : I. ix. 35; II. i. 32, vi. 42 

Heliconius : I. i. 15 

Hercules : ill. vi. 36 

Hero, of Sestos, loved by Leander : 

II. xvi. 31 
Hesperius : I. xv. 29 
Hippodamia, bride of Pelops : III. 

ii. 16 

Hippolytus : II. iv. 32, xviii. 24, 30 
Homcrus : I. viii. 61 ; in. viii. 28 
Hypsipyle, queen of Lemnos : II. 

xviii. 33 

lasius, a Cretan, loved by Ceres : 
in. x. 25 

Iaso, leader of the Argonauts : n. 

xiv. 33, xviii. 23, 33 
Icarius : II. xvi. 4 
Ida, Ide, a mountain in Phrygia : 

I. xiv. II, xv. 9 ; in Crete : in. x. 

25, 39 
Idaeus : III. vi. 54 
Ilia, or Rhea Silvia, mother of 

Romulus and Remus : II. xiv. 

15; III. vi. 47, 54, 61, 62 
Iliacus : m. vi. 76 
Iliades, son of Ilia : in. iv. 40 
lnachus, Inachos, a river of Argos : 

III. vi. 25, 103 
Indus : II. vi. 1 

Io, loved by Jove, and changed 
to a heifer: I. iii. 21; II. ii. 45, 

xix. 29 



Isis, a deity worshipped especially 
by women : I. viii. 74; ii. ii. 25, 
xiii. 7 

Ismarius, Thracian : n. vi. 7; ill. 

ix. 21 
Ithacus : III. xii. 29 
Itys, son of Tereus and Procne : II. 

vi. 10, xiv. 30; in. xii. 32 
lulus, son of Aeneas, also called 

Ascanius : in. ix. 14 
Iuno : n. xix. 29; in. x. 46, xiii. 3 
Iunonius : II. ii. 45, vi. 55 
luppiter : I. vii. 36, x. 8; II. i. 15, 

17, 18, 19, v. 52, xix. 28, 30; ill. 

iii. 30, 35, viii. 29, x. 20, xii. 33 



Lais, a courtesan of Corinth : I. v. 
12 

Lapitha, Lapithes, a wild people of 

Thessaly : II. xii. 19 
Lares, household deities : I. viii. 

113 

Latinus, king of the Latins : II. xii. 
22 

Laudamia, wife of Protesilaus : ii. 

xviii. 38. Cf. Heroides xin 
Laumedon : m. vi. 54 
Leda, Lede, mother of Helen : I. x. 

3; II. xi. 29 
Lesbis : n. xviii. 26, 34 
Libas, a love of Ovid : m. vii. 23 
Liber, Bacchus : I. vi. 60 ; ill. viii. 

52 

Libycus : n. xvi. 21 

Linos, a son of Apollo : III. ix. 23 

Livor : I. xv. 1, 39 

Lucifer, the morning star : I. vi. 65 

Lucretius, author of De Rerum 

Natura : I. xv. 23 
Luna: I. viii. 12, xiii. 44; II. v. 

38 

Lyacus, of Bacchus, wine : II. xi. 

49 ; m. xv. 17 
Lycoris, sung by Gallus : I. xv. 30 
Lydius : ill. i. 14 

Macareus, son of Aeolus, addressed 
by his sister-wife Canace in 
Heroid. xi. : II. xviii. 23 

Maccr, an epic poet, friend of 
Ovid : II. xviii. 3, 35 

Maconides, Homer : I. xv. 9 ; nr. 
ix. 25 



INDEX 



Maeonis, a woman of Maeonia : 11. 
v. 40 

Malea, a cape of the Peloponnese : 

n. xvi. 24 
Mars : i. i. 12, viii. 29, 30, 41, ix. 29, 

39 ; n. v. 28, ix. 47, xiv. 3, xviii. 

36; III. ii. 49, vi. 49 
Martia : m. vi. 33 
Martigena, son of Mars : III. iv. 39 
Mavors, Mars : in. iii. 27 
Melie, a nymph : in. vi. 25 
Memnon, King of Ethiopia, son of 

Aurora : I. xiii. 3 ; m. ix. 1 
Memphis : n. xiii. 8 
Menandros, writer of Greek 

comedy.: I. xv. 18 
Mens Bona : I. ii. 31 
Milanion, a lover of Atalanta : in. 

ii. 29 

Minerva : I. i. 7, 8, vii. 18; II. vi. 

35 ; m. ii. 52 
Minos, king of Crete : in. x. 41 
Musa : in. i. 6, viii. 23, xii. 17, xv. 

19 

Mycenaeus : II. viii. 12 



Nape : I. xi. 2, xii. 4 

Naso : I. epigram, 1 ; xi. 27 ; II. i. 

2; m. xiii. 25 
Neaera, a nymph : in. vi. 28 
Nemesis, sung by Tibullus : III. ix. 

31, 53, 57 
Neptunus : n. xvi. 27; III. ii. 47 
Nereides, daughters of Nereus : II. 

xi. 36 

Nereis, Thetis, daughter of Nereus : 

n. xvii. 17 
Nereus, a sea deity : II. xi. 39 
Nilus : II. xiii. 9; ill. vi. 40, 103 
Niobe : in. xii. 31 
Notus, the south-wind : I. iv. 12, 

vii. 16, 56; II. vi. 44, viii. 20, 

xi. 10, 62, xvi. 22 



Odrysius, Thracian : in. xii. 32 
Orestes, son and avenger of 

Agamemnon: I. vii. 9; n. vi. 15 
Orithyia, daughter of Erechtheus, 

king of Athens, carried away by 

Boreas : I. vi. 53 
Orpheus, son of Apollo and 

Calliope : in. ix. 21 
Osiris : II. xiii. 12 

522 



Ossa, a mountain in Thessaly : 11. 
i. 14 

Padus : II. xvii. 32 

Paeligni, a people of Central Italy : 

II. i. 1, xvi. 37; III. xv. 17 
Paelignus : n. xvi. 1, 5; in. xv. 3, 

8 

Pallas, the olive-tree : u. xvi. 8; 

in. iii. 28 
Paphos, an island sacred to Venus : 

n. xvii. 4 
Paraetouium, a city of Libya : 11. 

xiii. 7 

Parca, a Fate : n. vi. 46 * 

Paris : II. xviii. 23, 37 

Parius, of the island of Paros: 1. 

vii. 52 

Peliacus, of Mount Pelion : n. xi. 2 
Pelion, a mountain in Thessaly : n. 
i. 14 

Pelops : m. ii. 15 
Penates : n. xi. 7 

Penelope : 1. viii. 47; II. xviii. 21, 
29 

Peneus, a river of Thessaly : m. vi. 
31 

Phaeacius, of Phaeacia, a country 
in the Odyssey : in. ix. 47 

Pharos, an island near Alexandria : 
n. xiii. 8 

Phemius, a minstrel in the Odyssey : 

in. vii. 61 
Philomela, sister of Procne, changed 

to a nightingale : 11. vi. 7 
Phoceus : n. vi . 15 
Phoebas, Cassandra, priestess of 

Apollo : 11. viii. 12 
Phoebus : 1. i. 11, 16, iii. 11, v. 5; 

II. v. 27, xviii. 34; ni. ii. 51, 

viii. 23, xii. 18 
Phrygius : 1. x. 1 

Phthius rex, Peleus : n. xvii. 17 
Phylacides, Protesilaus, of Phylace : 
n. vi. 41 

Phyllis, a queen of Thrace, deserted 
by Demophoon : 11. xviii. 22, 32 
Pierides, the Muses : I. i. 6 
Pierius, of Pieria, the home of the 
Muses, near Mount Olympus : 
in. ix. 26 
Pisaeus, of Pisa, in Elis : in. ii. 15 
Pitho, a love of Ovid : ui. vii. 23 
Pollux : II. xvi. 13; m. ii. 54 



INDEX—. 



■AMORES 



Pontus : H. xi. 14 

Priameis, Cassandra, Priam's 

daughter : I. ix. 37 ; II. xiv. 13 
Priapus, a god of fertility : n. iv. 32 
Prometheus : n. xvi. 40 
Pudor : I. ii. 32 

Punicus, Phoenician red : II. vi. 22 
Pylius, old Nestor, of Pylos : III. 
vii. 41 

Quirimis, an ancient Roman god : 

III. viii. 51 
Quiris, a Roman citizen : I. vii. 29 ; 

HI. ii. 73, xiv. 9 

Remus : ni. iv. 40 

Rhesus, whose horses were stolen 

by Ulysses and Diomedes : i. ix. 

23 

Roma: I. xv. 26; H. ix. 17; ill. 

xv. 10 
Romanus : H. xii. 23 
Romulus : m. iv. 40 

Sabinae : I. viii. 39, x. 49; II. iv. 

15; m. viii. 61 
Sabinus, a poet friend of Ovid who 

wrote replies to the epistles of 

the Heroides : II. xviii. 27 
•Saera Via, a much-frequented street 

leading from the Roman Forum : 

I. viii. 100 
Salmonis, daughter of Salmoneus, 

mother of Neleus and Pelias by 

Neptune, who assumed the form 

of Enipeus : ill. Yi. 43 
Saturnus, father of Jove : HI. viii. 

35 

Selioeneis, Atalanta, daughter of 

Schoeneus : I. vii. 13 
Seylla, a monster dreaded by 

sailors : II. xi. 18; ill. xii. 21 
Seytliia : II. xvi. 39 
Semele, bride of Jove, mother of 

Bacchus : in. iii. 37 
Semlramis, queen of Babylon : I. 

v. 11 

Seres, a people of the far east : i. 
xiv. 6 

Simoia, a river near Troy : I. xv. 10 * 
Sithonius, Thraeian : HI. vii. 8 
Sophocleus : i. xv. 15 
Sulmo, Ovid's birthplace : u. xvi. 
1 ; ill. xv. 11 



Sygambra : I. xiv. 49 
Syrtes, dangerous gulfs off Africa : 
H. xi. 20, xvi. 21 

Tagus, a river of Spain : I. xv. 
34 

Tantalides, Agamemnon, descend- 
ant of Tantalus : H. viii. 13 

Tantalus, ancestor of the Atridae : 
HI. xii. 30 

Tatius, king of the Sabines, con- 
temporary with Romulus : i. 

viii. 39 

Tellus, the earth-goddess : h. 1. 
13 

Tenedos, an island near Troy : i. 
xv. 9 

Tereus, a king of Thraee who 
wronged his sister and wife : n. 
xiv. 33 

Thamyras, a minstrel in the Iliad : 

ni. vii. 62 
Thebanus : HI. xii. 35 
Thebe, the city : III. xii. 15 
Thebe, wife of Asopus : in. vi. 33. 

34 

Thersites, a deformed and spiteful 
Greek at Troy : II. vi. 41 

Theseus : I. vii. 15 

Thessalicus : in. vii. 27 

Thessalus : n. viii. 11 

Thetis, mother of Achilles : H, xiv. 
14 

Threieius : I. ix. 23, xiv. 21; ii. 
xi. 32 

Tibullus, an elegiac poet of Ovid's 
time: I. xv. 28; m. ix. 5, 15, 39, 
60, 66 

Tibur, a town near Rome : hi. vi. 
46 

Tithonus, the aged and immortal 

husband of Aurora : n. v. 35 ; 

ill. vii. 42 
Tityos, a Giant who attempted to 

wrong Latona : III. xii. 25 
Tityrus, a shepherd in Virgil's 

eelogues : I. xv. 25 
Tragocdia : ill. 1. 11, 29, 35, 67 
Triton, a sea deity : II. xi. 27 
Triumphus : H. xii. 16 
Troia : III. vi. 27, xii. 15 
Troianus : II. xii. 21 ; in. vi. 65, 

ix. 29 
Tros : i. ix. 34 

523 



INDEX 



Tydides, Diomedes, who wounded 
Venus in battle before Troy : I. 
vii. 31, 34 

Tyndaris, Helen, daughter of 
Tyndareus : II. xii. 18 



Ulixes : U. xviii. 21, 29 
Urbs, Rome : n. xiv. 16 



Varro, Roman poet of the Argonau- 

tica : I. xv. 21 
Venus : 1. i. 7, iv. 21, 66, viii. 30, 

42, 86, ix. 3, 29, x. 17, 19, 33, xi. 

26, 27; II. iii. 2, iv. 40, v. 23, 

vii. 21, 27, viii. 8, 18, x. 29, 35, 



xiv. 17, xvii. 19, xviii. 3; III. ii. 

55, 60, ix. 7, 15, x. 47, xiv. 24 
Vergilius : ill. xv. 7 
Verona : in. xv. 7 
Vestalis : in. vi. 75 
Victoria : in. ii. 45 
Virgo, Diana : I. i. 10 
Vulcanus : n. xvii. 19 

Xantlius, a river in the Troad : in. 
vi. 28 

Xuthus, husband of Creusa, 
daughter of Erechtheus of 
Athens : in. vi. 31 

Zephyrus : I. vii. 55; II. xi. 9, 41 



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